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Watch SpaceX launch more Starlink satellites and go for a Falcon 9 re-use record – Yahoo Style

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="UPDATE: SpaceX aborted today’s attempt, and will reset for a future attempt at a time and date to be determined.” data-reactid=”20″>UPDATE: SpaceX aborted today’s attempt, and will reset for a future attempt at a time and date to be determined.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="SpaceX is launching its latest Starlink mission today, with a takeoff time of 9:22 AM EDT (6:22 AM PDT) currently scheduled to take place at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The launch will carry 60 more Starlink broadband internet satellites to their low Earth orbit destination, using a Falcon 9 rocket with a booster that flew four times previously, including twice in 2018 and twice last year, most recently in November for another Starlink mission.” data-reactid=”21″>SpaceX is launching its latest Starlink mission today, with a takeoff time of 9:22 AM EDT (6:22 AM PDT) currently scheduled to take place at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The launch will carry 60 more Starlink broadband internet satellites to their low Earth orbit destination, using a Falcon 9 rocket with a booster that flew four times previously, including twice in 2018 and twice last year, most recently in November for another Starlink mission.

This launch will include a landing attempt for the Falcon 9 booster, meaning if all goes well SpaceX could recover it for a fifth time for an attempt at refurbishment and re-use. Five flights of a Falcon 9 booster would be a record for SpaceX – and the booster that it’s attempting this mission with is already a record-holder, since it achieved SpaceX’s existing high-water mark for re-use with its last November launch.

The primary mission is to deliver the sixth batch of 60 of SpaceX’s Starlink satellites to space, which will grow the total constellation size to 360. SpaceX plans to begin commercial operation of the constellation later this year if all goes well, providing high-speed, reliable broadband internet to customers in North America, with lower latency and better speeds than are available using existing satellite internet service, which depend on larger, geosynchronous satellites placed much farther out from Earth.

SpaceX will also be aiming to recover the two fairing halves used to protect the satellite cargo on this launch, using two ships stationed at sea that have large nets strung across struts extending from their surface. SpaceX has been attempting these recoveries in order to further increase the reusability (and reduce the cost) of launch but so far it hasn’t had much consistency in its success, catching three fairings in total. The fairing being used today flew before, too – during the May 2019 Starlink satellite launch.

The broadcast of the launch will begin above around 15 minutes prior to the target takeoff time, so at around 8:57 AM EDT (5:57 AM PDT).

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ISS is viewable in the Toronto night sky this week – The Loop

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For those in the Greater Toronto Area desperate for something to do this week, it might be time to dust off the telescope.

According to NASA’s SkyWatch website, the International Space Station will be viewable in the night sky this week as it flies between the area and the moon.

NASA’s data shows the ISS is scheduled to fly directly over downtown Toronto every night this week, with two passes on Thursday and Saturday. The space station will also be viewable in Toronto on Monday and Wednesday next week.

The areas surrounding Toronto, such as Pickering, Brampton and Burlington will also be able to view the station, although not as frequently and at slightly different times of night.  

NASA said the station will look like an airplane moving across the sky, except it doesn’t have flashing lights and will be moving considerably faster than an aircraft.

Stargazers will have to be ready, however, as the space station is only expected to be viewable for a couple of minutes each night.

For a list of exactly when the ISS will be visible, click here.

More on this story from CTVNews.ca

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Watch NASA's James Webb Space Telescope unfold its golden mirror for the 1st time (video) – Space.com

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NASA’s next great observatory, the James Webb Space Telescope, has fully deployed its primary mirror for the first time, marking another milestone on its journey to space.

Before all work on the next-generation instrument, which is scheduled to launch in 2021, was paused due to the COVID-19 pandemic, technicians and engineers at the agency were going through a series of tests with the telescope before it’s sent to French Guiana for liftoff aboard an Ariane 5 rocket

Recently, in one of these tests, the space telescope successfully extended and unfolded its entire 21 foot 4-inch (6.5 meters) primary mirror (the largest mirror of its kind that NASA has ever built). The mirror opened up into the same configuration that it will once the telescope is in space.

Related: Building the James Webb Space Telescope (gallery)

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has successfully deployed its giant primary mirror for the first time. It will launch in 2021.  (Image credit: Chris Gunn/NASA)

During the test, Webb’s mirror was hooked up to specialized gravity-offsetting equipment that simulated the zero-gravity environment in space. So, not only did the mirror deploy as designed, it did so in a space-like environment, demonstrating its readiness. Engineers and technicians will deploy Webb’s primary mirror only one more time before it’s shipped off to its launch site. 

Passing this test “is another significant milestone showing Webb will deploy properly in space. This is a great achievement and an inspiring image for the entire team,” Lee Feinberg, optical telescope element manager for Webb at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, said in a statement

Webb’s primary mirror is a critical piece of the instrument. A telescope’s sensitivity is directly related to the size of its mirror, which determines how much light the telescope can collect from the objects it observes. So, Webb’s mirror has to be really big in order for the instrument to be as powerful as possible. Webb’s mirror is so big that it cannot fit inside of a rocket while fully extended, so it needs to fold up in order to be transported to space. So it’s ability to fold up and then unfurl, ready to get to work, is crucial.

With the COVID-19 pandemic still very much underway, the regular workflow at NASA has been interrupted. Recently, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine announced that all NASA employees who are not considered essential mission personnel would be working remotely for the time being. 

For now, the Webb team from Northrop Grumman is still continuing integration and testing work in California, though they have shifted to reducing the number of people working at a given time, according to the statement. After the deployable tower assembly is set up in April, integration and testing will be fully stopped as a significant amount of NASA personnel are required for those operations. 

Follow Chelsea Gohd on Twitter @chelsea_gohd. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

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ISS is viewable in the Toronto night sky this week – CTV News

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TORONTO —
For those in the Greater Toronto Area desperate for something to do this week, it might be time to dust off the telescope.

According to NASA’s SkyWatch website, the International Space Station will be viewable in the night sky this week as it flies between the area and the moon.

NASA’s data shows the ISS is scheduled to fly directly over downtown Toronto every night this week, with two passes on Thursday and Saturday. The space station will also be viewable in Toronto on Monday and Wednesday next week.

The areas surrounding Toronto, such as Pickering, Brampton and Burlington will also be able to view the station, although not as frequently and at slightly different times of night.  

Stargazers will have to be ready, however, as the space station is only expected to be viewable for a couple of minutes each night.

For a list of exactly when the ISS will be visible, click here.

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