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WCB Nova Scotia announces further support for employers during COVID-19 – OHS Canada

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Employers who have frontline workers contract COVID-19 due to their work will not have the costs of those workplace injury insurance claims impact their industry rate or individual experience rating, the Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB) of Nova Scotia announced today.

“Workers and employers on the front lines of this pandemic are facing unprecedented challenges arising from COVID-19,” said Stuart MacLean, CEO.

“Claims costs arising from COVID-19 will not impact industry rates, or the experience rating of the individual employer, and will instead be spread over the general collective liability.”

As of today, there were 39 Nova Scotia workers who received compensation due to COVID-19, 19 of whom have returned to work.

The change announced today means that instead of an individual employer or industry having their rates affected by costs from claims related to COVID-19, they will be absorbed by the employer base as a whole.

Based on the relatively low numbers, the impact to any individual employer will be very small, if it is noticed at all. The change is not expected to impact the average rate.

Employer premium payments will also continue to be deferred until October 2020, including waiving of late fees and interest.

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Coronavirus Waterloo Region: 15 new cases of COVID-19 reported – CTV Toronto

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KITCHENER —
Region of Waterloo Public Health officials reported 15 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday, bringing the region’s total to 1,737.

There were another 12 cases of the disease that are considered resolved, bringing that total to 1,461.

Since the pandemic began, 120 people in the region have died from COVID-19. That leaves 156 active cases in the region, of which one is hospitalized. To date, 252 people have been hospitalized with the disease at some point.

One of the region’s six outbreaks was declared over on Thursday. Three child-care settings had declared outbreaks after a case was identified at each of them, but the region’s online COVID-19 dashboard shows that one of those outbreaks is over.

There are still five active outbreaks in the region: one at a congregate setting, with four total cases, one at a food and beverage service, which has four total cases, one at Kitchener Collegiate Institute, which has two cases, and two child-care settings, which each have one case.

Across Ontario, public health officials reported 538 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the provincial total to 52,248. Most of those were reported in Toronto-Area health units, including 229 new cases in Toronto, 101 in Peel Region and 43 in York Region. Sixty-six new cases were also reported in Ottawa.

There are currently 162 patients in Ontario hospitals with COVID-19. Of those 162 patients, 37 are being treated in an intensive care unit, while 17 are breathing with the assistance of a ventilator.

Ontario’s latest COVID-19 modelling data shows that Ontario is now doubling its new cases every 10 to 12 days, and the province could be recording 1,000 new cases per day in a matter of weeks.

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Ontario home-care providers push for expanded services to fight pandemic – CTV Toronto

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TORONTO —
Four major home-care providers are asking the Ontario government to increase support for their sector, saying it would reduce pressure on a health-care system burdened by COVID-19.

The companies — Bayshore HealthCare, Closing the Gap Healthcare, VON Canada, and SE Health — say bolstering home care will allow long-term care homes and hospitals to operate more efficiently.

The group has launched a campaign today on their call for support.

The CEO of Closing the Gap Healthcare says COVID-19 transmission rates in home-care settings are much lower than in congregate care.

Leighton McDonald says by focusing on community-care, the province can help keep more people safe from the virus.

According to provincial data through the height of the first wave of COVID-19 until the end of May, there were 235 virus cases related to home care, compared to 4,518 in long-term care homes.

“What didn’t happen early in the pandemic was home care wasn’t seen as a as a critical alternative to much of the institutional care” McDonald said.

“Had that happened, we would have seen many more people cared for outside of settings that could have been potentially hazardous.”

McDonald said the coalition is hoping to build public support for increased wages and stability for workers in the home-care sector, who he said are often paid less than their colleagues in hospitals and long-term care.

“We’d like to see more people on full time salaries, and have stable employment, so that they can actually earn a living and work with one employer,” he said.

Dr. Samir Sinha, the director of geriatrics at Sinai Health System and the University Health Network, has been advocating for an overhaul for the home-care system for years.

Sinha said more than 38,000 Ontarians are on wait lists to get into long-term care because there isn’t enough access to home care.

But the cost to care for someone in long-term care is $180 a day, compared to $103 a day in the home care system, he said.

“When we don’t actually have enough home and community care available it puts incredible pressures on our hospitals and it also creates incredible pressure on a nursing home system, which is expensive to run,” he said.

Sinha said keeping people out of congregate care settings, where COVID-19 has killed more than 1,830 people during the pandemic is an important strategy and will help the province address capacity issues in long-term care and hospitals.

Hamilton resident Barbara Weigelt and her 78-year-old husband accessed home-care services and support the calls to boost the sector.

Weigelt said her husband had a series of health problems over several years including a heart surgery and a stroke. With the support of a registered nurse at home, and on-call after-hours care, they were able to manage.

“I consider it a lifesaver,” she said. “If we hadn’t had that opportunity I don’t think we could have managed.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 1, 2020.

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COVID-19: Ontario home-care providers push for expanded services to fight pandemic – OrilliaMatters

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TORONTO — Four major home-care providers are asking the Ontario government to increase support for their sector, saying it would reduce pressure on a health-care system burdened by COVID-19.

The companies — Bayshore HealthCare, Closing the Gap Healthcare, VON Canada, and SE Health — say bolstering home care will allow long-term care homes and hospitals to operate more efficiently.

The group has launched a campaign today on their call for support.

The CEO of Closing the Gap Healthcare says COVID-19 transmission rates in home-care settings are much lower than in congregate care.

Leighton McDonald says by focusing on community-care, the province can help keep more people safe from the virus.

According to provincial data through the height of the first wave of COVID-19 until the end of May, there were 235 virus cases related to home care, compared to 4,518 in long-term care homes.

“What didn’t happen early in the pandemic was home care wasn’t seen as a as a critical alternative to much of the institutional care” McDonald said.

“Had that happened, we would have seen many more people cared for outside of settings that could have been potentially hazardous.”

McDonald said the coalition is hoping to build public support for increased wages and stability for workers in the home-care sector, who he said are often paid less than their colleagues in hospitals and long-term care.

“We’d like to see more people on full time salaries, and have stable employment, so that they can actually earn a living and work with one employer,” he said.

Dr. Samir Sinha, the director of geriatrics at Sinai Health System and the University Health Network, has been advocating for an overhaul for the home-care system for years.

Sinha said more than 38,000 Ontarians are on wait lists to get into long-term care because there isn’t enough access to home care.

But the cost to care for someone in long-term care is $180 a day, compared to $103 a day in the home care system, he said.

“When we don’t actually have enough home and community care available it puts incredible pressures on our hospitals and it also creates incredible pressure on a nursing home system, which is expensive to run,” he said.

Sinha said keeping people out of congregate care settings, where COVID-19 has killed more than 1,830 people during the pandemic is an important strategy and will help the province address capacity issues in long-term care and hospitals.

Hamilton resident Barbara Weigelt and her 78-year-old husband accessed home-care services and support the calls to boost the sector.

Weigelt said her husband had a series of health problems over several years including a heart surgery and a stroke. With the support of a registered nurse at home, and on-call after-hours care, they were able to manage.

“I consider it a lifesaver,” she said. “If we hadn’t had that opportunity I don’t think we could have managed.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 1, 2020.

Shawn Jeffords, The Canadian Press

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