Connect with us

News

‘We’re in big trouble’: Doctors worry Canada’s 4th wave of COVID-19 could be biggest yet – Global News

Published

 on


With case numbers shooting up in Ontario, Alberta and B.C., health experts worry that Canada could be going into its worst wave of COVID-19 yet, unless governments act now to stop it.

“We’re in big trouble,” said Dr. Joe Vipond, an emergency physician in Calgary and co-founder of Masks4Canada.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

His calculations show that Alberta’s case numbers are doubling roughly every 11 days. So, if that trend continues, he said, Alberta could see 1,200 new cases per day in early September, and 2,400 daily cases by the middle of the month.


Click to play video: 'Why climbing COVID-19 cases impact you — whether you’re vaccinated or not'



1:38
Why climbing COVID-19 cases impact you — whether you’re vaccinated or not


Why climbing COVID-19 cases impact you — whether you’re vaccinated or not

“There’s definitely been a noticeable increase in the number of COVID-19 patients that are coming into hospital over the last two weeks or so,” said Dr. Shazma Mithani, an emergency doctor in Edmonton’s Royal Alexandra Hospital and Stollery Children’s Hospital.

“Opening schools again in September is going to certainly fuel the fire in a significant way. And I’m worried about what that means for our children who cannot be vaccinated right now. And I’m worried about what that means for the hospitals.”

Read more:
What will Canada’s 4th COVID-19 wave look like? Here’s what the experts, data say

Alberta reported 744 new cases on Aug. 19, according to the government website. The highest number of cases ever reported in a single day was 2,389 on April 30, 2021.

It’s not the only province where cases are expected to increase.

Projections released Aug. 18 by the BC COVID-19 Modelling Group suggest that case numbers there are doubling every nine days, and predicts that without intervention, “cases will soon exceed record levels.”

The province could see 10,000 cases per day, said Dan Coombs, a mathematics professor at the University of British Columbia and member of the modelling group, but he believes that public health authorities would enact measures to curb the spread before things got that bad.

Read more:
B.C. becomes second province to require proof of vaccination, starting Sept. 13

With children not yet able to be vaccinated, the BC Modelling Group expects that many cases would be in young children.

In Ontario, if nothing changes, there could be 7,000 cases per day by mid-October, according to Dr. Allison McGeer, an infectious disease physician in the Sinai Health System in Toronto. This is well above the approximately 4,700 peak in early April.

The combination of the more transmissible Delta variant and looser restrictions means that the virus is experiencing exponential growth, she said.

“So if we don’t do something about it, our upward trajectory will increase in speed and we will inevitably move to a lot more cases and more hospitalizations and more ICU patients,” McGeer said.


Click to play video: 'The latest on COVID-19 and a looming fourth wave'



4:53
The latest on COVID-19 and a looming fourth wave


The latest on COVID-19 and a looming fourth wave

To stop this, we need to do more than just vaccinate people, Vipond said. “Unfortunately, we were told that the pandemic could end with vaccines. It has not and it will not.”

“We know what we need to do. We need to shut down mass gatherings and we need to close indoor dining for a period of time. These are the things that need to take place,” he said.

“It’s nice that we had a little bit of a break in the summer, that we were able to see people and we were able to do things. But we are going to have to roll that back. Not to nothing, not to lockdown, but back from where we are now,” McGeer said.

Read more:
Fourth wave of COVID-19 now underway in Canada, Dr. Theresa Tam says

This could be continuing to have people work from home when possible, she said, and refocusing again on masking and keeping social distancing.

Having limits on the size of social gatherings would help too, says Mithani, as would vaccine passports. “I do think it’s the people that are making the right decisions, like getting vaccinated, that should enjoy the freedoms of being able to be around other people,” she said.

She also says that provinces need to ensure that everyone has easy access to vaccines.


Click to play video: 'Why many Canadians may be going through compassion fatigue'



2:14
Why many Canadians may be going through compassion fatigue


Why many Canadians may be going through compassion fatigue

While McGeer knows that Canadians are frustrated at this point in the pandemic and just want to go back to normal, it unfortunately doesn’t matter, she said.

“It’s a virus and the virus does not care what you and I think. It does not care how tired we are of dealing with this. It does not care about anything except going on its merry way infecting people,” McGeer said.

“So I understand how miserable the choices are, but it doesn’t alter the fact that if we don’t do something about the increasing number of cases, we’re going to push our health care system over the limit again. And many people are going to die.”

— with files from Jamie Mauracher, Global News

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

News

Federal Court of Appeal uphold the rules that bolster compensation for air passengers subjected to delayed flights and damaged luggage

Published

 on

The Federal Court of Appeal says it will uphold all but one of the rules that bolster compensation for air passengers subjected to delayed flights and damaged luggage.

Air Canada, Porter Airlines and several other parties had argued that the passenger rights charter launched in 2019 violates global standards.

The appellants argued the charter should be rendered invalid for international flights.

But the court has ruled to dismiss the appeal, aside from the regulation that compensates passengers for the temporary loss of baggage.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

Continue Reading

News

Daughters of murder victim call on feds to act in light of Winnipeg killings

Published

 on

The daughters of an Indigenous woman police believe to have been the victim of a serial killer were on Parliament Hill this morning, calling on the federal government to take action.

Police believe Morgan Harris and three other Indigenous women in Winnipeg were murdered by the same man, who has been charged with four counts of first-degree murder.

Winnipeg police also say they think three of the victims’ bodies may be in a landfill, but they don’t plan to do a search because the area is too large.

Harris’s daughters, Cambria and Kera Harris, say the government needs to end violence against Indigenous women, girls and two-spirit people.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

The chief of Long Plain First Nation, where two of the four victims are from, is calling for resources for her community such as a 24-7 safe space for women.

Harris’s daughters also say if police won’t conduct a search to find their mother, they will.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 6, 2022.

Continue Reading

News

Flu spread is starting to hit older adults

Published

 on

Doctors say influenza spread is starting to hit older adults as surveillance levels indicate the hospitalization rate of seniors is not that far behind that of children.

Data from the Public Health Agency of Canada for the week ending Nov. 26 show that children under five still made up the highest number of hospitalized flu patients, but the rate at which people 65 years of age and older are hospitalized is also rising.

Hospitalizations among both young children and seniors have increased sharply over recent weeks during a flu season that started earlier than usual.

Infectious diseases specialist Dr. Isaac Bogoch says he’s already seeing more seniors with flu as in-patients at Toronto General Hospital.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

Bogoch says there’s a perfect storm of a monster influenza season without enough people getting the flu shot, while hospitals are overstretched.

Dr. Matthew Oughton, an infectious diseases specialist at Jewish General Hospital in Montreal, says in most years, children tend to get the flu first and then bring it home to parents and grandparents — and that hospitals in his province are on the cusp of seeing that impact.

Both doctors are urging people to get the shot, saying it’s not too late.

Continue Reading

Trending