Connect with us

Investment

What financial advisors are telling clients who want investment properties – The London Free Press

Published

 on


‘Real estate can be a very emotional purchase — there is an obscene amount of fear of missing out in the market — but in the end, the numbers speak for themselves’

Article content

After a year-plus of housing insanity, buying an investment property in many parts of Canada is a much more complicated calculation — even if you have the minimum 20 per cent down payment in hand.

Advertisement

Article content

Home prices have risen far faster than rent values in many regions, making it harder to find properties that can attract renters and produce positive cash flow — both in city centres and in exurban locations where many Canadians have chosen to ride out the pandemic. Whether properties outside cities will hold their value once people go back to working downtown also remains in question.

And that’s only part of the equation. Experts say a pricey property purchase, which could grow more expensive as interest rates rise, must fit into your long-term financial plan.

Much in the same way a sudden windfall can trigger unforeseen headaches, a poorly considered investment property purchase can wreak havoc with your long-term financial stability.

Advertisement

Article content

Here’s what three financial experts say they’d tell a moderately high-income individual who’s looking to increase her exposure to real estate by purchasing an investment property.

Carl Spiess, retired wealth manager, Toronto

“In general, it makes sense to at least balance the amount in your stock portfolio with your real estate holdings as part of your overall financial plan.

“I recall a conversation with a client in a group plan about 15 years ago. She was requesting a withdrawal of her full $50,000 from her RRSP to buy an investment property. Based on her other income, that would net only around $30,000 after tax. It also was the only stock market investment she had.

“As we chatted, [I found] out she was also becoming a real estate agent. So, between her home, her new career and her investment holdings, she was three times exposed to residential real estate and would now hold no other kinds of investments. I’m guessing — and hoping — it turned out OK for her, as real estate has done well. So has the stock market, so it might be a wash.

Advertisement

Article content

“But that was a moment where I really tried to help diversify a client’s overall financial holdings and didn’t succeed. Some would say put all your eggs in one basket and watch it carefully. I still like having a blend of investment types.”

Betty-Anne Howard, Assante Wealth Management, Kingston, Ont.

“It’s important to think through what purpose the rental property will serve as part of your overall plan. Is it your intention to use the rent for income later, during retirement? Or are you buying this rental property for capital appreciation and intend to sell it when you retire?

“I encourage my clients to take a close look at the income tax implications of purchasing a rental property and decide how they want to structure the expenses if their goal is to minimize taxes. This strategy needs to be offset by the income tax considerations when you want to sell or use the rental income to supplement your retirement income.”

Advertisement

Article content

Jason Pereira, Woodgate Financial, Toronto

“Real estate for investment purposes needs to be examined as such.

“I have, on countless occasions, run through the math with clients. The reality of life in the Greater Toronto Area is that market prices have driven investment property to ultra-low yields, and in many cases negative cash flow yields. That leaves only capital appreciation as a means of delivering any reasonable rate of return to the investor.

“The run-up of the last 15 years was unprecedented. Prior to that, the historical rate of appreciation was close to, or just above, the rate of inflation. The reality is, when yields are low-to-negative, one is simply making a highly leveraged bet on the pricing trend continuing. Given the fact that we are already facing an affordability crisis in Canada, there are a lot of headwinds when it comes to making that bet.

“Real estate can be a very emotional purchase — there is an obscene amount of fear of missing out in the market — but in the end, the numbers speak for themselves. Every investor should be asking themselves if they would make a highly leveraged bet, with little to negative yields, in any other investment. Odds are they would likely walk away.”

This article provides information only and should not be construed as advice. It is provided without warranty of any kind.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Investment

Investment firm head joins Algoma Steel's board – Sault Star

Published

 on


Article content

The president and chief executive officer of a New York-based investment firm is a new Algoma Steel board member.

Article content

Eric Rosenfeld founded Crescendo Partners in 1998.

He is a master of business administration graduate from Harvard University. Rosenfeld also serves on the boards of Primo Water Corp., CPI Aerostructures, Aecon Group and Pangaea Logistics Solutions, a release says.

He has served on boards since 1998. His first directorship was with Spar Aerospace, the company that developed the Canadarm used in space flights. Rosenfeld also served on the board of beverage maker Cott Corp.

He headed the arbitrage department of Oppenheimer & Co., an investment and brokerage bank, for 14 years before establishing Crescendo Partners.

Mary Anne Bueschkens, Gale Rubenstein, James Gouin, David Sgro, Brian Pratt and Rosenfeld join chair Andrew Harshaw, Andrew Schultz and Michael McQuade, a release says.

Our new board members bring critical expertise and diversity to the team,” said McQuade.

The other new members have backgrounds in the automotive, legal and construction sectors.

Bueschkens is a lawyer who has held various roles, including president and CEO of ABC Technologies, an automotive parts supplier.

Rubenstein is a partner in the Toronto-based law firm Goodmans LLP. She is counsel in the firm’s corporate restructuring group.

Gouin is a former head of Tower International, a global manufacturer of automotive products. He also worked 28 years at Ford Motor Company. He held two vice-president roles with the automaker.

Article content

Sgro is a senior managing director at Crescendo Partners. The firm’s services include consulting, mergers, acquisitions and capital raising support and private equity investment.

Pratt is a former chair and director of Primoris Services Corp., a parent company of construction and engineering firms. He was also president and chief executive officer and board chair of the Dallas-based Primoris, and its predecessor entity, ARB Inc., from 1983 to 2015. Pratt is a former chair of Legato Merger Corp.

All the board members are independent, except McQuade. He is ASI’s CEO.

The Sault Ste. Marie steelmaker started trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange on Thursday.

– with files from Postmedia Network

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Investment

Micron Urges Government Investment with R&D Spend – The Next Platform

Published

 on



Over the last twenty years, memory has risen from 10% of the semiconductor market to almost 30%, a trend that is expected to continue, propelled by compute at the edge all the way up to datacenter. To meet these demands, memory giant, Micron, has announced it will make $150 billion in internal investments, ranging from manufacturing and fab facilities to R&D to support new materials and memory technologies.

The nature of the announcement serves two purposes. The first is obvious, Micron is putting a stake in the ground around its bullish view for edge to datacenter growth and their role as a primary component maker. The second is only slightly less obvious: to compel the U.S. to match funds or continue new investment strategies to support U.S. fabs and semiconductor R&D.

While $150 billion is a sizable investment, the fab component of Micron’s plans will gobble up a significant fraction. While no fab is created equally, consider TSMC’s investments in new facilities, which are upwards of $9 billion. Such investments can take two to three years to yield but the time is certainly right. Gartner, for instance, estimates the costs for leading-edge semiconductor facilities to increase between 7-10%.

While DRAM and NAND are less expensive than leading edge technologies, Micron will need to choose carefully as it sets its plans in motion. Luckily, there is ample government support building in the U.S. for all homegrown semiconductor industry, although it is unclear how federal investments, including the $52 billion CHIPS Act, will augment Micron’s own ambitions.

Micron is seeking the attention of government with its broad R&D and manufacturing investment, pointing to the creation of “tens of thousands” of new jobs and “significant economic growth.” In a statement, Micron explained that memory manufacturing costs are 35-45% higher than in lower-end semiconductor markets, “making funding to support new semiconductor manufacturing capacity and a refundable investment tax credit critical to potential expansion of U.S. manufacturing as part of Micron’s targeted investment.”

“The growth of the data economy is driving increased customer demand for memory and storage,” said Executive Vice President of Global Operations Manish Bhatia. “Leading-edge memory manufacturing at scale requires production of advanced semiconductor technology that is pushing the laws of physics, and our markets demand cost-competitive operations. Sustained government support is essential for Micron to ensure a resilient supply chain and reinforce technology leadership for the long term.”

Micron CEO, Sanjay Mehrotra says the company will “look forward to working with governments around the world, including in the U.S. where CHIPS funding and the FABS Act would open the door to new industry investments, as we consider sites to support future expansion.” The subtext there is that the U.S. is only one country in the running, among others making investments.

Increasing government support will likely align with fabs and facilities but Micron says it’s working on next generation technologies set to keep pace with growing demand.

This is part of the company’s 2030-era plan for memory technology. Micron sees edge and cloud deployments expanding but also points to AI as the leading workload across deployment types. The company’s senior VP and GM for Compute and Networking, former Intel HPC lead, Raj Hazra, says that by 2025, 75% of all organizations will have moved beyond the AI experimentation stage into production.

To support this more practically, Micron has set forth some ambitious near-term targets, including reaching for 40% improvements in memory densities over existing DRAM, double SSD read throughput speeds over current 1TB SSDs, 15% power reductions over existing DRAM and 15% better performance for mixed workloads over existing NAND.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Investment

Walmart allowing some shoppers to buy bitcoin at Coinstar kiosks

Published

 on

Walmart Inc said on Thursday customers at some of its U.S. stores will be able to purchase bitcoin using ATM-like machines installed by  Coinstar.

Coinstar, known for its machines that can exchange physical coins for cash, has partnered with digital currency exchange CoinMe to let customers buy bitcoin at some of its kiosks.

There are 200 Coinstar kiosks located inside Walmart stores across the United States that will allow customers to buy bitcoin, a Walmart spokesperson said.

Walmart was subject to a cryptocurrency hoax in September when a fake press release was published announcing a partnership between the world’s largest retailer and litecoin. The news had briefly sent prices of the little known cryptocurrency surging.

 

(Reporting by Uday Sampath in Bengaluru; Editing by Devika Syamnath)

Continue Reading

Trending