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What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Sunday, May 31 – CBC.ca

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The latest:

  • Provincial campgrounds will reopen tomorrow, but COVID-19 restrictions will keep half the sites closed.
  • Alberta has partnered with a number of fast-food chains to provide free, non-medical masks starting in early June.
  • Alberta reported just 13 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, bringing the total active cases to 604.
  • There are 54 people in hospital, five of whom are in intensive care. One more person has died. 
  • CEMA announced Thursday the city will begin reopening its 1,100 playgrounds on Friday — three days ahead of schedule.
  • Calgary’s quickly proliferating expanded outdoor restaurant patios are getting mixed reviews.
  • Alberta’s sexual violence helpline saw a 57 per cent increase in calls during the first month of the pandemic and a 42 per cent increase during the first two months.
  • The Alberta government has scaled back the provincial COVID-19 news conferences it had been offering every weekday and is now holding them on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. 

What you need to know today in Alberta:

Campgrounds in Alberta’s national parks will remain closed until at least June 21, but provincial campgrounds will open at half capacity starting tomorrow.

The Alberta government is distributing 20 million masks meant to help limit the spread of COVID-19. They will be available for pick up from the drive-thrus of A&W, McDonald’s and Tim Hortons. 

There have been 143 deaths due to COVID-19 in the province. 

There are 53 people in hospital and five in intensive care. More than 257,000 tests have been completed.

Most active COVID-19 cases are still found in the Calgary zone. Here’s a regional breakdown of cases:

  • Calgary zone: 461 active cases, 4,295 recovered.
  • Edmonton zone: 67 active cases, 464 recovered.
  • South zone: 44 active cases, 1,182 recovered.
  • North zone: 27 active cases, 200 recovered.
  • Central zone: 2 active cases, 95 recovered.
  • Unknown: 3 active cases, 9 recovered.

This map provides an overview of how COVID-19 has impacted the province of Alberta as of May 29, 2020. (CBC News)

What you need to know today in Canada:

Quebec reported another 530 cases of the virus on Friday. Its total number of cases has grown past 50,000 and the death toll to 4,363.

In Ontario, cases have surged by 344 for a total of 27,210 with 2,230 deaths. Premier Doug Ford has said he is looking at reopening the province region by region.

Canada’s economy shrank at an 8.2 per cent annual pace in the first three months of 2020, as an already weak economy in January and February was walloped by COVID-19 in March.

This map shows the number of active cases in Calgary as of May 29, 2020. (CBC News)

As of 8 p.m. ET Saturday, Canada had 90,190 confirmed and presumptive coronavirus cases. A CBC News tally of deaths based on provincial data, regional information and CBC’s reporting stood at 7,136.

Self-assessment and supports:

Alberta Health Services has an online self-assessment tool that you can use to determine if you have symptoms of COVID-19.

The province says Albertans who have returned to Canada from other countries must self-isolate. Unless your situation is critical and requires a call to 911, Albertans are advised to call Health Link at 811 before visiting a physician, hospital or other health-care facility.

If you have symptoms, even mild, you are to self-isolate for 10 days from the onset of symptoms. 

You can find Alberta Health Services’ latest coronavirus updates here.

The province also operates a confidential mental health support line at 1-877-303-2642 and addiction help line at 1-866-332-2322, available from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., seven days a week. 

Online resources are available for advice on handling stressful situations and ways to talk with children.

There is a 24-hour family violence information line at 310-1818 to get anonymous help in more than 170 languages, and Alberta’s One Line for Sexual Violence is available at 1-866-403-8000, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

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Facebook Advertising Exodus Could Benefit Smaller Businesses, says Local Entrepreneur – VOCM

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Large international advertisers are fleeing the Facebook platform in light of the Black Lives Matter and the Stop Hate for Profit movements. While the impact on Facebook has been significant in terms of advertising dollars, it’s doubtful large companies will abandon the platform altogether.

That’s according to Terry Hussey of Vigilant Management, who is skeptical about the reason why big advertisers are leaving Facebook.

He says a lot of corporations were about to slash their advertising budgets anyway due to the economic devastation wrought by COVID-19.

Josh Taylor of txtsquad says larger advertisers leaving the platform is good news for smaller and medium-sized businesses that rely on social media to serve their customer base, but he doesn’t believe the big advertisers can skip Facebook completely. He says while there are some real challenges related to the social media platform, he calls it a “workhorse” that has defied predictions that it is on the way out.

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Facebook losing the boycott battle

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As an advertising boycott of Facebook continues to grow, Mark Zuckerberg shows no sign of backing down.

The campaign, involving some of the world’s biggest companies, calls on Facebook to do more about hate speech and misinformation.

Facebook boss Mr Zuckerberg says he thinks the brands will be back “soon enough” and that Facebook’s policies won’t change. It’s a story that cuts to the heart of how the internet interacts with democracy, freedom of speech, business and how we define truth and hate.

In the latest of his weekly reports, this is Ros Atkins on Facebook and the boycott.

Source: BBC

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Japan to US: Extradite men accused of helping ex-Nissan boss flee – Aljazeera.com

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Japan has formally asked the United States to extradite a former Green Beret and his son, who are accused of helping former Nissan Motor Co boss Carlos Ghosn flee the country while he was awaiting trial on financial charges.

Japan submitted a request to the US Department of State to extradite Michael Taylor and his son, Peter Taylor, after they were provisionally arrested in Massachusetts in May, the US Department of Justice said in a court filing on Thursday.

Attorneys for the Taylors did not immediately respond to requests by Reuters for comment. Their lawyers have argued that they have not been charged in Japan with an offense for which extradition is possible under the US-Japan treaty.

The Japanese embassy in Washington and the Department of Justice did not respond to requests for comment.

The Taylors were arrested in Harvard, Massachusetts, on May 20 at Japan’s request after authorities there in January accused the pair of helping smuggle Ghosn, Nissan’s former chairman, out of the country on December 29, 2019, in a box.

Ghosn fled to Lebanon, his childhood home, after being charged with engaging in financial wrongdoing, including by understating his compensation in Nissan’s financial statements. He denies wrongdoing.

Lebanon has no extradition treaty with Japan.

Both men have been held without bail since their arrest. Prosecutors have argued that neither Taylor – including Michael, a US Army Special Forces veteran and private security specialist – should be released from jail as they are flight risks.

SOURCE:
Reuters news agency

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