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What you need to know about COVID-19 in Ottawa on Sunday, Nov. 15

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What’s the latest?

The COVID-19 pandemic is creating boom times for local businesses in picturesque Almonte, Ont., as people decide to travel closer to home — but local health officials would prefer that visitors from higher-risk areas stay away.

Ottawa Public Health reported another 78 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday but no new deaths.

Those numbers come one day after health officials announced two more assessment centres would soon be set up in the downtown core.

Across the river in western Quebec, another 62 cases and one new death were logged Saturday.

How many cases are there?

As of Saturday, 7,844 people have tested positive for COVID-19 in Ottawa, including 511 active cases and 6,977 resolved cases.

The city’s death toll rests at 356.

Public health officials have reported more than 12,400 COVID-19 cases across eastern Ontario and western Quebec, including nearly 10,900 resolved cases.

Eighty-six people with COVID-19 have died elsewhere in eastern Ontario, along with 64 in western Quebec.

CBC Ottawa is profiling those who’ve died of COVID-19, starting with one of the city’s youngest victims. If you’d like to share your loved one’s story, please get in touch.

What can I do?

Both Ontario and Quebec are telling people to limit close contact only to those they live with, or one other home if people live alone, to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Ottawa is currently in the orange zone of the provincial pandemic scale, meaning larger organized gatherings are allowed and restaurants, gyms and theatres can reopen.

Ottawa’s medical officer of health, Dr. Vera Etches, has said people should focus on managing risks and taking precautions, such as seeing a few friends outside at a distance.

The Eastern Ontario Health Unit is in yellow, with slightly looser rules around serving hours and restaurant capacities, but they are slated to be moved to orange as of Monday.

The rest of eastern Ontario is green, the lowest level.

The medical officer of health for the Kingston, Ont., area is asking residents to stay within the region to avoid more “spillover” from Toronto and Ottawa.

 

Canada’s COVID-19 second wave is accelerating. Frightening new modelling projections, especially for Ontario and B.C., make it more frustrating for many Canadian doctors who say health guidelines are still contradictory, vague or just plain weak. 2:01

In Gatineau and the surrounding area, which is one of Quebec’s red zones, health officials say the situation is stable, but now needs to improve. They are still asking residents not to leave home unless it’s essential.

Indoor dining at restaurants remains prohibited, while gyms, cinemas and performing arts venues are all closed.

The rest of western Quebec is orange, which allows private gatherings of up to six people and organized ones up to 25 — with more in seated venues.

Travel from one region to another discouraged throughout the Outaouais. Ontario says people shouldn’t travel to a lower-level region from a higher one.

What about schools?

There have been about 200 schools in the wider Ottawa-Gatineau region with a confirmed case of COVID-19:

Few have had outbreaks, which are declared by a health unit in Ontario when there’s a reasonable chance someone who has tested positive caught COVID-19 during a school activity.

WATCH: Questions left unanswered about extending winter break

 

Mike Dubeau, director-general of the Western Quebec School Board, says administrators need to know how long the break will last and how teachers will be expected to make up that time. 0:49

Distancing and isolating

The novel coronavirus primarily spreads through droplets when an infected person coughs, sneezes, breathes or speaks onto someone or something. These droplets can hang in the air.

People can be contagious without symptoms.

This means people should take precautions such as staying home when sick, keeping hands and frequently touched surfaces clean, socializing outdoors as much as possible and maintaining distance from anyone they don’t live with — even with a mask on.

Ontario has abandoned its concept of social circles.

Etches says people should be wary of blind spots, like taking a lunch break at work with colleagues or carpooling.

 

Two women wearing masks walk past Parliament Station at Queen and O’Connor streets in Ottawa on Oct. 22, 2020. (Andrew Lee/CBC)

 

Masks are mandatory in indoor public settings in Ontario and Quebec and should be worn outdoors when people can’t distance from others. Three-layer non-medical masks with a filter are recommended.

Anyone with COVID-19 symptoms should self-isolate, as should those who’ve been ordered to do so by their local public health unit. The duration depends on the circumstances in both Ontario and Quebec.

Health Canada recommends older adults and people with underlying medical conditions and/or weakened immune systems stay home as much as possible.

Anyone who has travelled recently outside Canada must go straight home and stay there for 14 days.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

COVID-19 can range from a cold-like illness to a severe lung infection, with common symptoms including fever, a cough, vomiting and the loss of taste or smell.

Less common symptoms include chills, headaches and pink eye. Children can develop a rash.

If you have severe symptoms, call 911.

Mental health can also be affected by the pandemic and resources are available to help.

Where to get tested

In eastern Ontario:

Ontario recommends only getting tested if you have symptoms, or if you’ve been told to by your health unit or the province.

Anyone seeking a test should now book an appointment. Different sites in the area have different ways to book, including over the phone or going in person to get a time slot.

People without symptoms, but who are part of the province’s targeted testing strategy, can make an appointment at select pharmacies.

Ottawa has eight permanent test sites, with additional mobile sites deployed wherever demand is particularly high.

The Eastern Ontario Health Unit has sites in Alexandria, Cornwall, Hawkesbury, Limoges, Rockland and Winchester.

The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark health unit has permanent sites in Almonte, Brockville, Kemptville and Smiths Falls.

 

People walk through the streets of Almonte, Ont., on Nov. 14, 2020. The picturesque mill town west of Ottawa has seen an influx of tourists from Ottawa-Gatineau as the COVID-19 pandemic keeps people closer to home. (Natalia Goodwin/CBC)

 

Kingston’s test site is at the Beechgrove Complex. The area’s other test site is in Napanee.

People can arrange a test in Bancroft and Picton by calling the centre or Belleville and Trenton online.

Renfrew County residents should call their family doctor or 1-844-727-6404 for a test or with questions, COVID-19-related or not. Test clinic locations are posted weekly. There are none on Remembrance Day.

In western Quebec:

Tests are strongly recommended for people with symptoms or who have been in contact with someone with symptoms.

Outaouais residents can make an appointment in Gatineau seven days a week at 135 blvd. Saint-Raymond or 617 avenue Buckingham.

They can now check the approximate wait time for the Saint-Raymond site.

There are recurring clinics by appointment in communities such as Gracefield, Val-des-Monts and Fort-Coulonge.

Call 1-877-644-4545 with questions, including if walk-in testing is available nearby.

First Nations, Inuit and Métis:

Akwesasne now has 30 known active cases of COVID-19, its highest of the pandemic.Ten of them are on the Canadian side of the international border.

Its council is asking residents to avoid unnecessary travel.

Aswesasne schools are temporarily closed to in-person learning and its Tsi Snaihne Child Care Centre has also closed. It has a COVID-19 test site available by appointment only.

Anyone returning to the community on the Canadian side of the international border who’s been farther than 160 kilometres away — or visited Montreal — for non-essential reasons is asked to self-isolate for 14 days.

The Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte reported its first confirmed case last week.

People in Pikwakanagan can book a COVID-19 test by calling 613-625-2259.

Anyone in Tyendinaga who’s interested in a test can call 613-967-3603.

Inuit in Ottawa can call the Akausivik Inuit Family Health Team at 613-740-0999 for service, including testing, in Inuktitut or English on weekdays.

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The 1976 U.S. swine flu vaccinations may offer lessons for the COVID-19 pandemic – CBC.ca

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For Pascal Imperato, a communicable disease epidemiologist who in 1976 was in charge of immunizing New York City against a potential swine flu epidemic, the effort to vaccinate the population against COVID-19 feels like a familiar challenge.

“We were going to vaccinate six million people in six weeks,” he said in a phone interview. “And we were absolutely certain we could pull it off. And we would have.”

Would have, because, ultimately, the largest national immunization program that had ever been undertaken in the U.S. was cut short as the epidemic never materialized, and public skepticism about the program began to mount.

Still, while the COVID-19 pandemic is very real, and the population is much larger, the vaccination program of 1976 may offer some lessons as governments around the world prepare to inoculate the public at large.

“If the program is well organized, mobilizing all of the resources that are capable of administering this vaccine, there [shouldn’t] be any problem whatsoever,” Imperato said. 

In March 1976, the administration of then president Gerald Ford launched a $137 million US nation-wide vaccination program to immunize every American citizen by the end of the year.

The diagnosis of swine flu on a New Jersey army base had led to panic among top U.S. scientists and officials who feared the disease could spread and potentially precipitate a health crisis similar to the deadly Spanish flu outbreak of 1918.

Even though it was cut short, by December 1976 more than 40 million Americans — about one-fifth of the population — had been vaccinated, and about 650,000 in New York City.

Utilizing volunteers, setting up sites

Imperato said that on any given day they had about 900 people who were involved in getting the vaccine out to the general public. That included 500 to 600 volunteers who were recruited each day through the city’s chapter of the American Red Cross.

University graduates, sanitary inspectors and public health nursing assistants were also hired and trained to use automatic jet injectors and to give cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 

Sixty vaccination sites were established in places that included schools and police precincts.

“Anywhere we could,” said Imperato, who is the founding dean and distinguished service professor at SUNY Downstate Medical Center School of Public Health.

Mary O’Brien, 77, resident of the St. Augustine Home, Chicago, winces as she is inoculated against the swine flu in 1976. (Bettmann Archive/Getty Images)

As well, 15 mobile teams were created to vaccinate over 40,000 people in more than 200 nursing homes and about 100,000 people in 150 senior citizen centres.

“This required military organization, if you will, and we were able to put together a team and put into place the people that we needed to bring this about,” he said.

A great deal of administrative and clerical support goes into a program of this kind, he said.

“We have to have people register. We had to have as much information about them as possible, because we needed to know who we were vaccinating and if any of them had any reaction. We had to have teams of people checking on adverse events.”

Local capacity can be the ‘weak link’

Nationwide, however, there  were some logistical problems, said Harvey Fineberg, a physician who was tasked with co-authoring a review into the 1976 Swine flu vaccine program.

The actual immunizations were quite erratic in their frequency in different communities, he said.

“So a lesson that’s still relevant today, whether in different provinces in Canada or different states and counties and the U.S., is the local capacity,” he said.

“That last mile, getting the immunization into the arms of the recipients, that’s the weak link in the chain.”

What made the difference  was the degree of organization and capacity of the public health departments in each community to plan and administer the vaccine, Fineberg said.

“So it wasn’t that it was only cities or only rural, rich or poor, it boiled down to ability to deliver.”

WATCH | Experts discuss strategies for Canada’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout 

As Canada prepares to distribute millions of doses of COVID-19 vaccines in January, Chair of the National Advisory Committee on Immunization Dr. Caroline Quach-Thanh and David Levine, who managed the H1N1 vaccine rollout for Montreal, say this vaccination campaign won’t be without challenges. 3:56

Dealing with ‘coincident events’

But one of the more significant problems of the program was the poor job officials did in communicating to the public when headlines emerged linking potential adverse effects to the vaccine, experts say.

“There are definitely — and this is going to be true this coming year — there will be coincident events,” Fineberg said.

“Preparing the public for expected coincidences simply because stuff happens every day, that’s really, really key,” he said.

During the 1967 vaccination program, three elderly people in Pittsburgh had heart attacks after receiving their vaccine. The publicity and headlines it generated led to a handful of states suspending their vaccination programs while they investigated a potential association, said George Dehner, an associate professor of history at Witchita State Univeristy and authour of Influenza: A Century of Science and Public Health.

While no link to the vaccination was found, polls at the time showed a significant decrease in the number of people who said they would get the vaccine because they feared some adverse effect, Dehner said.

A patient takes part in Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial in May. On Sunday, a U.S. health official said the country’s first immunizations could begin on Dec. 12. (University of Maryland School of Medicine/File/The Associated Press)

There will be a certain expected death rate of people of a certain age on any given day, Pascal said. And what one has to look at is the death rate above the expected rate when running an immunization program.

“And so the CDC in this particular case did not do a good job of anticipating that and explaining that,” Dehner said.

But the vaccination rollout also saw dozens of people come down with the rare neurological disorder Guillain-Barre syndrome at a much higher rate than would be expected. Unlike the heart attacks, where no link was found, a scientific review has found there was an increased risk of Guillain-Barre syndrome after the swine flu vaccinations, according to the CDC. The exact reason for this link remains unknown.

In a 2009 interview with the The Bulletin, the health journal of the World Health Organization, Fineberg said those cases wouldn’t have been “a blip on the screen had there been a pandemic but, in the absence of any swine flu disease, these rare events were sufficient to end the programme.” 

Focus on science, not politics

When Guillain-Barre syndrome increased, some members of the public “became very skeptical and saw the whole thing as politically based, and not science-based,” said Richard Wenzel, emeritus chairman and professor of the Department of Internal Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University.

“There was a concern that maybe politics was driving some public health responses.”

“One of the things that I would say we’re still trying to learn is policy should be scientifically based. What I mean is that whoever gives the message has to say, ‘Here’s what we know, here’s what we don’t know. And here are the assumptions we’re making currently that guide our policy.

“That sounds simple, but it’s rarely done, even today.”

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Dozens infected after BC hockey team brings COVID-19 back from Alberta | Offside – Daily Hive

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A recent trip to Alberta had unintended consequences for an adult hockey team from British Columbia.

BC Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry highlighted what she called “another cautionary tale” during her media briefing today, as the province reported another 834 new COVID-19 cases. Alberta, by contrast, reported more than double that number today.

“We know that there are sports teams in BC that have travelled to other provinces despite the restrictions that we’ve put in place,” said Henry.

“There’s a hockey team in the interior that travelled to Alberta and has come back and now there are dozens of people who are infected, and it has spread in the community,” said Dr. Henry. “We need to stop right now to protect our communities and our families, and our health care workers. This is avoidable and these are the measures that we need to take.”

While adult hockey was allowed to continue, this team was in clear defiance of the provincial health order, which bans “travel for teams outside of their community.” Dr. Henry said the players who contracted the virus in Alberta have since spread it to their family members, workplaces, and community upon return to BC.

“Making an exception for yourself, or for your team, or for your recreational needs puts a crack in our wall and we see that this virus can exploit that very easily,” she said.

While adult hockey was allowed in the most recent health order, it appears that will be changing very soon.

“We are putting additional restrictions on adult team sports indoors as we are recognizing that these are indeed higher risk activities as well. What we will be focusing on is structured programs or sport for children and youth, recognizing how important those are for our young people.”

Dr. Henry said there have been “several incidents that are similar to this,” and as such, she didn’t want to give away which specific region they came from or where they travelled to.

“I’m asking in the strongest of terms, to stay put,” she said. “To stay in our communities and to protect our communities.”

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Origin of Revelstoke cluster unknown, but some visitors did test positive for COVID-19 – BC News – Castanet.net

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Interior Health has not been able to identify how a large cluster of COVID-19 cases were introduced to the community of Revelstoke, however, the region’s chief medical health officer admits some non-residents have tested positive for the virus.

During a Zoom press conference Wednesday afternoon, Dr. Albert de Villiers said a “patient zero” has not been identified, despite Premier John Horgan stating earlier in the day that the cluster was caused by people travelling for recreation.

“What we can say with the numbers that we have seen that, yes, there are some people that are not residents in Revelstoke that sadly are infected as well,” said Dr. de Villiers.

“But having said that, we have also seen there is no one specific incident that led to the bigger number of cases. There are some that have been household clusters, some people picked it up when they went to a worksite, some people may have gone to a private function. There are rumours out there we haven’t been able to substantiate that someone went to a hot spring somewhere.

“I think there are different pieces of this. It’s not just one person that travelled in and caused all of this, I don’t think it’s as simple as that.”

Dr. de Villiers says people travelling in from other communities has been a factor in cases in other communities, which is why, he says, part of the provincial recommendations are for people not to travel outside their community if they don’t absolutely have to.

“Sadly, skiing is not essential to most people,” he said. “For recreation purposes, try to stick to your own community and stick to your own ski hill.”

Dr. de Villiers also addressed an online post out of Revelstoke where an individual asked to be infected with the virus so he could become immune.

He says they’ve seen it before with chicken pox and the measles, but it’s a bad idea with COVID-19 because people don’t know how they’ll react.

“Most people will have a relatively mild form of the disease…but there are people, relatively healthy people, that can develop complications. We’ve had people throughout Canada of all ages that have passed away,” he said.

“I don’t think we want to put people at risk unnecessarily.”

The doctor also explained why it took two weeks for IH to publicly disclose the cluster in Revelstoke.

He says over a two-week period there were only 10 cases, one every day or second day, which isn’t abnormal within communities.

“But, all of a sudden in one day, there were 12 more cases,” he said. “That’s why when we did announce it, it was 22, because there was one day that had more than usual.”

He said they do expect cases to pop up in communities, but the large one-day jump was reason to believe there may have been an issue.

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