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What's it like being a contact tracer? – larongeNOW

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That involves some digging on Kot’s part.

“We are trying to search,” she said.

Kot will receive information about a case and speak to the person who has contracted the virus to determine what kind of contact they’ve had with others over the previous 14 days.

“Usually it involves a bit of a lengthy interview with the person who has COVID-19, discussing with them not only what having COVID-19 means but what the implications could be for various people they may have come in contact with,” she said.

Friends, family members, co-workers and other members of a person’s community could all have been exposed when one person contracts COVID-19.

“Some people are very good historians and some it takes a bit of time to gain that trust before you can get the whole story,” Kot said. “I would be the same way if I was in their shoes. I might not remember where I was seven days ago and who I was with.”

Kot said it is not unusual for her to call someone a second time, just to clarify their contacts or give someone time to remember where they’ve been.

“I’m very impressed. A lot of people have given us very good, valuable information to go on,” she said.

Once she receives a list of names from the individual with COVID, Kot sets out to determine what contact would have occurred and determine if the person needs to self-monitor or self-isolate, or whether the contact is of no concern.

“I think sometimes there is a little bit of the fear factor there for people but most people have been, I would say, very accommodating, very appreciative and very co-operative. People have really helped us out a lot,” Kot said.

“Certainly some people are a little bit annoyed but I always reassure people and say it’s kind of a good thing when you’ve been named as a contact because you get the benefit of receiving the information from public health that you maybe need to stay isolated.”

Kot said there is no average day on the job for her since the pandemic started.

“There isn’t an average day. You come into work, you see what’s on the agenda and you just sort of go to work,” Kot explained. “It’s really an interesting job.

“The actual cases of COVID-19 come in sporadically. We’ve been lucky here in Regina and the surrounding area, we haven’t had too many cases … In a given day, we may not be doing contact tracing so much as maybe dealing with the actual contacts on a daily basis. It’s a variety.”

Kot says a lot of her knowledge and experience as a public health nurse helps her in her work as a viral investigator.

“I have a fair amount of experience dealing with different types of diseases and this is just another one that we add into the bag and do the best of our ability to try and help people through it, and with a large degree of confidentiality …,” she said. “People need that. They need to know that their information is safe.

“Certainly every once in a while a call comes along that you sometimes need to gain people’s trust and give them a little bit of reassurance. Their world has kind of been turned upside down by this phone call and we’re going to help get you through this.”

Most of the time, Kot says people take her calls very well and are often appreciative.

“I have to give people credit. They have done a very good job. They often pull out their calendar and they give us the best information that they can to try and remember. And sometimes the next day we get a little bit more information because they’ve had a chance to think about it and I think that’s a fair way to do things,” she said.

One challenge Kot says contact tracers face is the volume of work.

“The ebb and flow of communicable disease control is not controllable,” she said. “It just happens when it happens and so sometimes the days just get very long but they’re very rewarding, too.”

Kot loves the feeling at the end of the day when she’s finished her list of calls.

“(It’s rewarding) when you complete a day and you manage to get through all of your contacts and everyone knows what they’re supposed to be doing and the community is hopefully a bit safer at the end of the day,” she said.

Currently, Kot says viral investigators are anticipating the start of the school year, though they don’t expect any dramatic increases in work due to students heading back to class.

“We’re always busier when school starts so I don’t think we’ll be all that different with COVID-19, but definitely the type of work that we’ll be doing will probably revolve around that,” she said.

While times may be trying, Kot said she feels lucky to work as a viral investigator.

“I love the work, definitely,” she said. “You get a chance to meet people from all walks of life and families and communities.”

She wants to remind people that should they ever be on the receiving end of a call from a contact tracer, it’s to help them.

“We’re full of people who are interested in hearing what you have to say and our goal is to try and keep people safe and minimize risk,” she said. “If you get a call from us, we’re hopeful that we can help you.”

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30 of 42 new Manitoba COVID-19 cases are in Winnipeg, as more possible exposures announced – CBC.ca

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Winnipeg’s growing active COVID-19 caseload jumped again on Wednesday, when 30 of Manitoba’s 42 new cases of the illness were people who live in the capital city.

The update in a provincial news release came with a familiar plea to people living in or visiting Winnipeg: wash your hands, reduce the number of people you see from outside your household and stay home when sick.

There are now 418 active COVID-19 cases in Manitoba, with 335 of those — 80 per cent — in Winnipeg.

Wednesday’s update also came with more warnings about public places in Winnipeg that have had possible COVID-19 exposures. Several more bars and restaurants and a college are now among the places where people may have been exposed to the illness.

The new exposures include Earls restaurant in St. Vital (on Sept. 15 from 5:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.), Leopold’s Tavern in River Heights (on Sept. 15 from 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.) and a trivia night at Wee Johnny’s Irish Pub in the Exchange District (on Sept. 15 from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.).

Possible exposures were also announced at Local Public Eatery downtown (on Sept. 15 and 16, though no times were provided) after exposures were previously announced at the restaurant on Sept. 11 and 12. More information about possible public exposures is posted on the Manitoba government’s website.

Anyone who was at those places on the listed dates and times should watch for symptoms; if any develop, those people should immediately get tested for COVID-19 and self-isolate, the release says.

Late Wednesday, the Winnipeg School Division said a cohort of students at Grant Park High School was in self-isolation as someone at the school had tested positive.

Health officials told the school division that the person did not contract the virus in the school and risk to other students is considered low, division spokesperson Radean Carter said in an email. 

One cohort at the school will begin self isolation while awaiting further instruction from public health, Carter said.

In a letter posted online, public health officials said the person was at the school on Sept. 15, 16 and 17 and that the affected class has been moved to remote learning.

A case of COVID-19 has also been linked to Red River College’s Notre Dame Campus in Winnipeg, the college said in an email to students on Wednesday afternoon.

The school got word from public health officials about the positive test on Wednesday, the message from chief human resource officer Melanie Gudmundson said. The person did not have symptoms while on campus, and the risk of further spread at the school is considered low, the email said.

One classroom has been closed for deep cleaning and disinfection, and everyone who was in that space on the day the sick person was there has been sent home, the email said.

Thirty of Manitoba’s 42 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday are in Winnipeg. Due to data revisions by Manitoba Health, the sum of new cases in this chart may not necessarily match daily figures announced by health officials. (Jacques Marcoux/CBC)

On top of the 30 cases in Winnipeg, an additional six of the new cases announced Wednesday are in the Southern Health region. A further three are in the Prairie Mountain Health region, two are in the Interlake-Eastern health region and the remaining one is in the Northern Health region, the news release says.

Manitoba’s COVID-19 test positivity rate — a five-day rolling average of the number of tests that come back positive — jumped to 2.2 per cent from 1.8 per cent on Tuesday, the release says.

There are 11 people hospitalized with COVID-19 in Manitoba, including five people in intensive care. That’s up from eight people in hospital and two people in intensive care on Tuesday.

19th death confirmed Tuesday

A resident of Winnipeg’s Parkview Place care home has died of COVID-19, the company that runs the home confirmed on Tuesday. The person’s death, which was not included in the province’s update, was Manitoba’s 19th coronavirus-linked fatality.

A spokesperson for the province said public health doesn’t announce or comment on COVID-19 deaths until investigations are complete.

As of Tuesday, seven residents and one staff member at the Winnipeg care home had tested positive for COVID-19.

Meanwhile, the outbreak at the Rideau Park Personal Care Home in Brandon, Man., is now over, the province’s release on Wednesday says.

The site has been moved down from critical red to caution yellow in the province’s colour-coded pandemic response system.

There are three more people in hospital with COVID-19 in Manitoba on Wednesday, all of whom are in intensive care. Due to data revisions by Manitoba Health, the sum of new cases in this chart may not necessarily match daily figures announced by health officials. (Jacques Marcoux/CBC)

To date, 1,674 cases of the illness have been identified in the province and 1,238 people have recovered.

Two other deaths linked to COVID-19 were announced in Manitoba on Monday

One was a woman linked to the outbreak at the Brandon Regional Health Centre’s Assiniboine Centre, Chief Provincial Public Health Officer Dr. Brent Roussin said.

The other was a man connected to a communal living setting in the Southern Health region, Roussin said.

The number of confirmed cases of the illness linked to the outbreak at John Pritchard School in Winnipeg had reached 20 people, health officials said on Tuesday, nearly triple what it was a week earlier.

Twenty-one of the province’s 42 new COVID-19 on Wednesday are people under age 30, according to provincial data, including two under age 10. Due to data revisions by Manitoba Health, the sum of new cases in this chart may not necessarily match daily figures announced by health officials. (Jacques Marcoux/CBC)

Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman urged the province to mandate face masks across the province on Tuesday, though he acknowledged the city could bring in the new rules in Winnipeg on its own.

Earlier this week, the province announced a partnership with Dynacare, a private testing lab, which is expected to more than double how many COVID-19 tests Manitoba can do.

On Tuesday, 1,703 more COVID-19 tests were done in Manitoba, bringing the total completed in the province to 170,045.

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'We're in crisis mode': Infectious disease specialist calls on residents to reduce activities during second wave COVID-19 – CTV Edmonton

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OTTAWA —
As the second wave of COVID-19 continues in Ottawa, an infectious disease specialist is calling on residents to take precautions into their own hands.

“Right now, we’re in crisis mode,” said Dr. Abdu Sharkawy, CTV News Infectious Disease Specialist, in an interview with CTV News Ottawa.

“Only do what you have to do. I don’t want to use the term lockdown, but I think you really have to reduce your social circle,” said Dr. Sharkawy.

Speaking with CTV Morning Live Wednesday morning, Dr. Sharkawy said until the second wave of the virus settles down, people should be limiting trips and avoiding any special gatherings that aren’t essential.

“It’s not business as usual, every decision that you make, whether it’s work, school, socially related or otherwise it’s going to have an impact throughout your community,” said Dr. Sharkawy.

“Let’s take it upon ourselves, everybody needs to be accountable.”

Meanwhile, the idea of a second lockdown is a worrying one for some small businesses, like the King Eddy in the Byward Market.

“I’m not really sure who could survive another lockdown to be honest with you,” said Johnny Bonney, assistant general manager of the King Eddy.

Bonney said with the recent spike in COVID-19 cases and the second wave of the virus affecting the city, business has already declined.

He’s hopeful to be able to continue to welcome patrons safely.

“We’re doing everything we can to make it safe, and to continue for it to be safe, not only for our customers, but for our employees, so I think people should be able to dine out with confidence,” Bonney said.

Ottawa Public Health said due to the rising number of COVID-19 cases it would consider new closures and restrictions, but with a targeted approach to address possible sources of COVID-19.

Ottawa Public Health’s Medical Officer of Health Dr. Vera Etches told Council that she does not want to have to shut things down.

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Common Cosmetic Dental Procedures and Their Benefits

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If you aren’t confident in your smile, then you aren’t living your best life. That might seem dramatic, but it’s true. If you don’t like to show your smile, then your confidence and self-esteem suffer, and your mental health can be affected. Not only that, but studies have shown that smiling can make you feel happier, as opposed to the other way around. If you aren’ smiling, then you aren’t as happy as you can be. Luckily, there are options. Cosmetic dentistry has come a long way over the past few decades, and there is bound to be a proven treatment that can get you the bright, brilliant smile you’ve always wanted.  

Teeth Whitening

Tooth whitening is perhaps the most common cosmetic dental procedure of them all. Teeth can get stained or damaged over time, often from certain food and drinks. Teeth also get stained from smoking. You can get a take home whitening kit, but for the best results, contact a dental professional. Not only is teeth whitening a quick and easy way to brighten your smile, but it is cost-effective too. 

Bonding

If the stains on your teeth are too deeply ingrained, or you have chips in your teeth, then dental bonding might be the right choice for you. Bonding material is malleable and can be molded to the outside of your teeth to hide imperfections. Bonding is a popular choice, but the material is not permanent. It can deteriorate over time, meaning that you may need to have the procedure performed several times throughout your life. 

Veneers

Veneers are a more long-lasting solution than dental bonding. The dentist will take a mold of the teeth to manufacture a porcelain shell that fits directly over the affected spot. This shell is hard, and colored to match the surrounding teeth so that it doesn’t stand out. Veneers are a perfect option for people who have staining that is so ingrained that it cannot be removed through whitening and bleaching. Many people will choose a veneer over dental bonding simply because it will last longer. 

Implants

One of the most detrimental things to an otherwise wonderful smile is a missing tooth. That’s where dental implants come into play. An implant is a titanium rod that is surgically placed into the gum to act as a root. The dentist can then install a replacement artificial tooth onto the implanted rod. This is a permanent solution instead of using dentures or other temporary fixes. They are relatively easy to maintain and can be treated just like your regular teeth. As long as your gum stays healthy enough to support the implant, it will remain in place. 

Crowns

Crowns function similarly to veneers, in that they cover up decay and damage. Anytime you see a performer with gold teeth, they are most likely crowns, but they are most often much more subtle. They are manufactured with acrylic or porcelain, and custom-made to fit the mouth into which they are being applied. They are then fused to the metal rods implanted into the teeth. They are made so that they match in shape and color with the surrounding teeth, so no one would know that they are not natural. 

Invisalign Braces

You might think that braces are only for children, but adults may need them as well. It could be from teeth that were neglected in youth, or from recent trauma, but adults getting braces is more common than you might think. However, since adults don’t want to look like children, invisalign braces are a great solution. They can fix misalignments and protruding teeth just like regular braces, but they are almost impossible to notice unless someone examines the mouth closely. This way, adults can still feel their own age even while wearing them. 

Dental Abrasion

Since discoloration is such a huge issue for many people, it stands to reason that there are several options to help get teeth back to their natural shine. Abrasion is a process that involves removing stains by essentially sanding down the surface of the tooth. It will only work on very shallow stains, and will not work on stains that have penetrated inside the tooth. However, once the stains are removed through abrasion, they are gone forever. 

 

These are some of the more common cosmetic dental procedures, however you may need something different to fix your smile. While it’s important to know what options are out there, do not visit your cosmetic dentist from Calgary and assume you will get one of the procedures over the others. Your dentist will assess your situation, including the health of your entire mouth, to determine the best course of action. It may be one of these most common options, or it may be something different. There is always new innovation and data in dentistry to come up with techniques to improve smiles at affordable prices. No matter what, in the end your dentist can give you the brightest smile possible so that you can feel confident and happy again. 

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