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When discussing media freedom, Canada shouldn’t leave Indigenous journalism off the agenda – The Globe and Mail

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Karyn Pugliese is an assistant professor of journalism at Ryerson University and a board member of Canadian Journalists for Free Expression. She is a citizen of the Pikwàkanagàn First Nation in Ontario.

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Karyn Pugliese is an assistant professor of journalism at Ryerson University and a board member of Canadian Journalists for Free Expression. She is a citizen of the Pikwàkanagàn First Nation in Ontario.

Canada is hosting the Global Conference for Media Freedom today. It is the second iteration of what is expected to become an annual event where governments discuss issues related to the protection of media freedom, safeguarding journalists, and the freedom of expression and human rights. The three topics Canada chose to focus on are safe ones: media freedom, the impact of the pandemic and disinformation. If those sound as if they were chosen by bureaucrats, it’s because they were.

There has already been criticism of the conference from press freedom groups, given that it was shrunk from two days to one. Also that Canada took little input from its own media and press freedom agencies, and that the country is failing to address problems with its own record on issues such as freedom of information. My personal disappointment is that Canada left Indigenous peoples off the agenda.

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Canada had an opportunity to create a much needed space for Indigenous people at this and future conferences. It has shown leadership in this area before, such as by accepting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP), which includes the right of Indigenous people to establish their own media and encourages state-owned media to reflect Indigenous cultural diversity. Next month will be the five-year anniversary of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which emphasized the important role media and journalism schools must play in the process. Canada is also the first country, and remains one of the few, to help establish a national Indigenous broadcaster.

Of course, Canada has failed previously in this regard as well. Press freedom violations such as the arrest of Oneida journalist Karl Dockstader, and the prior arrests and detainments of other journalists who cover Indigenous land disputes, are a black mark on its record. Most of the working Indigenous journalists in Canada are female, and they sometimes face violence on the job. Last year, fed up with physical assaults on women reporters at APTN, then-CEO Jean La Rose issued a public warning that the company would start pressing charges against anyone laying hands on their staff.

Earlier this year, I conducted interviews with 15 Indigenous female journalists who walked away from jobs in mainstream Canadian media. As detailed in the report, Half the Story Is Never Enough, published by Journalists for Human Rights and the Canadian Commission for UNESCO, they cited sexual harassment, racism and discrimination and a lack of mental health support as key reasons why they left.

If Canada is too embarrassed to admit its own record is flawed – and instead allow politicians and bureaucrats to sanitize debate with safe, feel-good topics – it will never be able to champion real global issues of press freedom.

In 2014, I met Patagaw Talimalaw, a 32-year old woman with a contagious smile. Ms. Talimalaw was a former reporter for Taiwanese TV who had recently moved to Winnipeg and taken on the role of secretary general for the World Indigenous Television Broadcasters Network, which brought together journalists in Norway, Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan, the United States and Canada.

The organization was formed out of shared interests – a way for cash-strapped and under-resourced Indigenous broadcasters to share news and programming. But Ms. Talimalaw had other plans. She had contacts among Indigenous peoples around the world, including human-rights activists who faced arrest and even death for pursuing their work. Her idea was to use the confederation and its Indigenous reporters to shine a light on these dark places. Unfortunately, she died unexpectedly of a seizure just a few months after she arrived in Canada. The network fell apart without her.

Last month, a small list of Canadian press freedom advocates including myself were invited to preview Canada’s plans for the Global Conference for Media Freedom. When I suggested an UNDRIP panel, I imagined how it might restart the work Ms. Talimalaw had envisioned. Since the conference is virtual this year, it would have cost Canada practically nothing to arrange. Nothing, perhaps, but an admission that we have work to do here as well.

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News Media Lobby Group Asks MPs for Rules to Get Compensation from Google, Facebook – ChrisD.ca

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By The Canadian Press

GoogleGoogle This Tuesday, July 19, 2016, file photo shows the Google logo at the company’s headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Marcio Jose Sanchez)

OTTAWA — A lobby group for Canada’s newspapers and magazines is asking MPs to enact new rules to help its members negotiate compensation from social-media giants that post content the traditional media produce.

News Media Canada wants the government to let the industry negotiate collectively with the likes of Google and Facebook.

There are similar rules in other countries, such as Australia and France, where Google announced last week it had signed compensation agreements with several daily newspapers and magazines, including Le Monde.

News Media Canada’s CEO, John Hinds, said Canadian rules similar to those would negate the need for any new taxes or spending programs.

“It allows the industry and the digital monopolies to negotiate fair terms for compensation,” Hinds told MPs on the House of Commons heritage committee Friday.

“It doesn’t raise taxes, it doesn’t deal with government sort of intervening in the marketplace, but it allows a fair market interaction between the platforms and newspapers.”

The committee is studying the challenges the pandemic has created for media and culture groups.

Several members of the committee lamented the reduction in local news coverage as their newspapers cut back on coverage and editions to keep the lights on.

Hinds said some smaller newspapers closed permanently due to the pandemic, while larger publications saw newsroom layoffs.

The federal wage subsidy, he said, has been helpful in avoiding worse.

Advertising revenue plunged by 75 per cent at the start of the pandemic in many markets, he said, and the industry is still struggling with advertising declines in the range of 30 per cent.

The federal government announced a $30-million communications budget at the start of the pandemic, but Hinds said there was limited placement of the resulting ads in Canadian news media.

“The government can deliver on its mandate to communicate with Canadians by implementing a strategy of placing ads where Canadians are looking for trusted content and advertising,” he said.

Without federal help, he added, the future is grim for many of his member organizations.

CP - The Canadian Press

CP - The Canadian Press

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My golden rule for social media: talk trash to your heart’s content, but do it in private – The Guardian

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My golden rule for social media: talk trash to your heart’s content, but do it in private  The Guardian



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Alternative social media platforms fuel polarization and conspiracies | Watch News Videos Online – Globalnews.ca

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As social media giants begin cracking down on disinformation and misinformation, rival sites are popping up, where anyone can say anything they want and get away with it. Jackson Proskow reports on the new platforms where lies and falsehoods go unchallenged.

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