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Why an art student dumped 62,000 pounds of carrots in the middle of a London street – Yahoo Canada Sports

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A college student is facing backlash over his allegedly “insensitive” art project.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Rafael Perez Evans, a Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) student at Goldsmiths, University of London, unveiled his controversial exhibition on Sept. 29.” data-reactid=”20″>Rafael Perez Evans, a Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) student at Goldsmiths, University of London, unveiled his controversial exhibition on Sept. 29.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The art installation, which was designed as his M.F.A. final project, basically involved dumping hundreds of thousands of carrots into the street. Evans, who is 29, left 240,000 carrots (about 62,000 pounds worth) outside of his college, according to Hypebeast.” data-reactid=”21″>The art installation, which was designed as his M.F.A. final project, basically involved dumping hundreds of thousands of carrots into the street. Evans, who is 29, left 240,000 carrots (about 62,000 pounds worth) outside of his college, according to Hypebeast.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Evans has stated on his website that the project was, in part, a reference to the practice of “dumping,” a form of protest that European farmers have used to boycott price drops. In some cases, Evans told Artnet, prices can get so low that it actually costs farmers money to get rid of their produce.” data-reactid=”22″>Evans has stated on his website that the project was, in part, a reference to the practice of “dumping,” a form of protest that European farmers have used to boycott price drops. In some cases, Evans told Artnet, prices can get so low that it actually costs farmers money to get rid of their produce.

“In the city, we are not very connected to the processes of how the things we consume are produced, under which circumstances and conditions,” Evans added.

Not everyone felt his message was worthwhile, though. Several of Evans’ classmates have spoken out against the installation, calling it “incredibly wasteful.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="As Hypebeast reported, four Goldsmiths students even created an Instagram account, goldsmithscarrots, to protest the project. The group has been working to collect, peel and cook as many of Evans’ carrots as it can — all for a good cause.” data-reactid=”25″>As Hypebeast reported, four Goldsmiths students even created an Instagram account, goldsmithscarrots, to protest the project. The group has been working to collect, peel and cook as many of Evans’ carrots as it can — all for a good cause.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="So far, goldsmithscarrots has raised more than £1,600 (nearly $2,100). Proceeds from the carrot-themed recipes have been going straight toward local food banks, which the students argue are in great need.” data-reactid=”27″>So far, goldsmithscarrots has raised more than £1,600 (nearly $2,100). Proceeds from the carrot-themed recipes have been going straight toward local food banks, which the students argue are in great need.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="“Lewisham [the borough where Goldsmiths is located] is one of the poorest boroughs in London and this mass dumping of carrots at Goldsmiths is beyond insensitive,” the group wrote on Instagram. “It’s a massive slap in the face.”” data-reactid=”28″>“Lewisham [the borough where Goldsmiths is located] is one of the poorest boroughs in London and this mass dumping of carrots at Goldsmiths is beyond insensitive,” the group wrote on Instagram. “It’s a massive slap in the face.”

Evans, meanwhile, has held that the carrots were all “unwanted.” He wrote on his website that they will be “collected and sent to feed animals” after the exhibition.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The students behind goldsmithscarrots aren’t waiting for that moment. The group has continued collecting Evans’ vegetables, turning them into soup, muffins and of course, mini carrot cakes.” data-reactid=”31″>The students behind goldsmithscarrots aren’t waiting for that moment. The group has continued collecting Evans’ vegetables, turning them into soup, muffins and of course, mini carrot cakes.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="If you liked this story, check out In The Know’s article on the seven richest stars on TikTok.” data-reactid=”33″>If you liked this story, check out In The Know’s article on the seven richest stars on TikTok.

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Rifle Paper Co. just launched floral puzzles that are gorgeously impossible” data-reactid=”36″>Rifle Paper Co. just launched floral puzzles that are gorgeously impossible

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The post Why an art student dumped 62,000 pounds of carrots in the middle of a London street appeared first on In The Know.” data-reactid=”39″>The post Why an art student dumped 62,000 pounds of carrots in the middle of a London street appeared first on In The Know.

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Interactive art installation in Benny park helps local artist be heard during the pandemic

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A new interactive art installation in NDG’s Benny park is making a lot of noise.

Titled the Hexaphone, passersby are invited to see what it feels like to be in a recording studio without ever walking through a door.

Located in the shadow of the Notre-Dame-de-Grâce sports centre, five wooden music stations emit isolated sounds of instruments and vocals from local artists.

Listeners can hear the individual sounds of each musician and instrument but also a complete ensemble when they arrive at the centre of the hexagonal installation.

The sounds are paired with a visual element. Screens give the audience an intimate inside look at a recoding session.

 

The project was put on by the city of Montreal in partnership with the borough, multiple local artists and the Trouble Makers recording studio.

Up-and-coming local singer Thaïs, whose music is featured in the project, said it was a blessing to have her voice and work heard by a new audience during this hard time for performers.

“It was a cool experience, because I can do a show so it was a great way to show my music to public and new people,” Thaïs said.

Seen playing the piano and singing in the installation, as an emerging artist, Thaïs said she was thankful for the opportunity for this kind work.

“We have to adapt during times like this,” she said.

The installation is apart of a city-funded cultural initiative.

The goal of the project, according to the borough, is to allow people to enjoy local talent in a safe environment during the coronavirus pandemic.

“This gives people some kind of artistic and cultural experience given that the options are limited in this context,” borough councillor Christian Arseneault said.

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Arsenault says this gives the public a reason to venture outdoors and experience art in a safe way without leaving their neighborhood.

“It’s perfect for social distancing. There is no need to touch buttons. We feel this is ideal for the situation we find ourselves in right now, ” he said.

The Hexaphone installation operates from 3 to 10 p.m.

The temporary piece will be playing a tune until Nov. 4.

 

Source: – Global News

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Hamilton says thank you to health-care providers through public art – Global News

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The City of Hamilton is turning to public art to pay tribute to health-care workers.

With the help of a citizen-led volunteer jury, the city has announced 15 winning designs that will be printed and installed on utility boxes outside four of Hamilton’s hospitals.

The tourism and culture division’s Ken Coit says the winning designs, chosen from 92 submissions, celebrate and support the role of health care providers in managing the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read more:
‘Truly heroes’: Tributes pour in for doctors, nurses fighting coronavirus pandemic

Coit notes that one design depicts people hanging out the windows of a building, “saying thank you, just like we had that tradition of banging pots out the windows” when the pandemic started last spring.

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He says other winning submissions are “just fun and say thank you and have happy heart,” while others are “really compelling images of health-care workers.”

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Installation of the graffiti-resistant wraps should be completed in the spring on traffic signal boxes outside of Hamilton General Hospital, Juravinski Hospital and St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton — Charlton and West Fifth locations.

Read more:
Hamilton gets its first legal street art wall as part of city’s graffiti management strategy

Coit notes that the project is an extension of public art on 35 utility boxes in the downtown core last year, around the theme of “celebrating urban life.”

He says that initiatives help “prevent graffiti,” “reach out to young artists to give them an opportunity to have the stuff displayed” and “create a sense of pride of place.”

Artists will receive $650 for the use of their work.

The project is funded by Hamilton’s transportation, operations and maintenance division and through the contributions of developers to the Downtown Hamilton Public Art Reserve.

The city spends more than $2 million each year to clean up litter and graffiti, which Mayor Fred Eisenberger has described as a “pervasive problem.”


Click to play video 'YYZ Why?: Graffiti Alley evolved to become a top Toronto destination'



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YYZ Why?: Graffiti Alley evolved to become a top Toronto destination

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Concordian Ashley Raghubir wins 2020 Canadian Art writing prize – Concordia University News

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Concordia Master of Art History student Ashley Raghubir is the winner of the 2020 Canadian Art Writing Prize.

Raghubir’s award-winning essay explores the depiction of water and air in the works of Afrofuturist artist Pamela Phatsimo Sunstrum and the poet Nathaniel Mackey. The Paris Review literary magazine recently featured both Phatsimo Sunstrum and Mackey.

“I was thinking about water; I was thinking about air and breath. And I was writing this essay toward the end of June, so I was very much thinking about George Floyd’s death,” Raghubir says.

“Nathaniel Mackey was responding to Eric Garner’s death in 2014, who uttered the same words about being unable to breathe.”

Raghubir notes that there is a deeply sad series of connections in this portfolio.

“My essay was thinking about those ideas and incorporating different theorists and writers and other poets whose work informed my master’s research.”

A different take on the Middle Passage

Artist and writer Gelare Khoshgozaran, a member of the prize jury, described Raghubir’s writing in a press release for Canadian Art magazine.

“It departs from the blue of painting to navigate water and air through their material and symbolic connections to Black diaspora breath,” Khoshgozaran notes.

“Framing Sunstrum’s new and recent paintings as ‘a representation of thrivance,’ Raghubir posits care and protection as constants that define the past and future of Black diaspora life and kinship.”

The prize, offered annually by Canadian Art, is meant to encourage new contemporary art writers. Raghubir will receive a $3,000 award and will be commissioned to write a feature story for a future issue.

For Raghubir, there are meaningful connections between the works she explored in her essay — particularly in Sunstrum’s depictions of her subjects near and sometimes created out of water — and the two pieces she’s focusing on for her thesis. South African Afrofuturist artist Mohau Modisakeng’s Passage and American photographer Ayana V. Jackson’s Take Me to the Water are at the core of her current research.

Both pieces engage with the Middle Passage, the forced transatlantic voyage of enslaved Africans. Modisakeng’s series of three projections depicts three Black characters in small boats that are eventually submerged by black water. Jackson’s portrait series captures Black women in regal dress against a pitch-dark background.

“I’m looking at how these artists are representing the Middle Passage in an Afrofuturist way through focusing on the concept of ancestral Black waters. I’m also looking at the use of dress in both artists’ work, the apparel and adornment, as a way to examine the Afrofuturist representations of these historical traumas,” she explains.

“I’m really interested in these works as artistic interventions into Black diasporic histories. I think that through Afrofuturism, there’s a very clear historic intervention. But it’s also a way to understand the origins of present-day contemporary anti-Black racism and violence.”

Launch of the new Afrofuturisms Research Collective

Raghubir adds that the archive of those passages is incomplete and doesn’t meaningfully reflect the stories of African men and women who experienced them, contributing to the erasure of their personal histories.

“In a way these artists representing something like the Middle Passage or other events in Black diasporic histories is a way to intervene in the representation of history that in some ways has been denigrated and not explored.”

Raghubir points to the way Modisakeng and Jackson afford their subjects the power archival records may have denied them by portraying them looking directly at the camera “in a way that conveys self-possession and agency, resistance and resilience.”

Her work is supervised by Alice Ming Wai Jim, professor of art history and Concordia University Research Chair in Ethnocultural Art Histories. Raghubir is also a core member of the Ethnocultural Art Histories Research (EAHR) student group, where she’s helped host exhibitions, galleries and public talks with Black, Indigenous and people of colour researchers.

This year, Raghubir launched the Afrofuturisms Research Collective under the EAHR’s umbrella, with fellow Concordia graduate students Ojo Agi, Anastasia Erickson and Olivia McGilchrist. The collective is hosting a virtual public lecture series during the fall and winter, and they’re considering writing together.

“We’re collaborating and supporting one another’s work through a collective practice,” Raghubir says.

“There’s clear synergy among our individual practices, and it was a really beautiful idea to come together, launch a public lecture series and really formalize what we’ve begun to do over the last few months. We’re trying to activate different theoretical frameworks on Afrofuturisms and different artistic practices.”


Find out more about Concordia’s
Afrofuturisms Research Collective and the Ethnocultural Art Histories Research Student Group.

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