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Why Canada might need a climate law — and how it might work – CBC.ca

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Beginning with Brian Mulroney in 1988, four different prime ministers have committed this country to nine different climate targets over the last 32 years.

So far, five of those carbon emissions targets — for the years 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2012 — have been missed by wide margins. Stephen Harper set two different targets for 2020; we’re going to miss those as well.

The pressure to meet those targets was almost entirely political and, apparently, insufficient. Neither domestic nor international opinion was enough to convince successive governments to do what was required to significantly reduce emissions.

Public opinion may have shifted markedly in the last few years, but some environmentalists and climate policy analysts think that Canada’s chances of meeting its next two targets — for 2030 and 2050 — would improve if those commitments were written into law.

It surely couldn’t hurt — even if it’s still going to take more than a law to ensure Canada does its fair share to combat climate change.

Legally-binding targets

Along with setting a goal of net-zero emissions by mid-century, Justin Trudeau’s Liberals promised during last fall’s campaign to establish “legally-binding” emissions targets at five-year intervals from now until 2050. They also said those targets — which would chart a path to 2030 and 2050 — would be informed by advice from scientists, economists and other experts.

A timeline for legislation depends on when the government decides to turn its attention to matters unrelated to the pandemic. But there are now two proposals that describe how the government could proceed.

The first report was released earlier this month by a coalition of environmental groups (EcoJustice, the Climate Action Network, West Coast Environmental Law, Equierre, Environmental Defence and the Pembina Institute). The Canadian Institute for Climate Choices, established earlier this year with federal funding, released its own recommendations last week.

Based on international and provincial examples (both British Columbia and Manitoba have introduced similar climate legislation), the two reports are broadly aligned on what the federal government’s climate accountability legislation should look like.

Long-term climate targets would be written into law and clear lines of responsibility for ministers would be established. Neither proposal imagines specific consequences for failing to meet a target — but both would require the government to report regularly on progress toward reducing Canada’s emissions, with oversight provided by an arms-length body or institution.

A fiscal model for climate accountability

In the United Kingdom, which has become a model for climate accountability, a publicly funded expert committee provides independent advice and analysis and monitors the government’s progress. That body was established in 2008. Last year, the British government officially legislated a target of net-zero by 2050.

To some extent, such legislation could build the sort of structure around climate policy that already exists in Canada for federal fiscal policy.

Both of the proposals in the two reports would introduce a national carbon budget — a set limit on the amount of greenhouse gas emissions Canadians cumulatively produce each year, or over a given period of time. While a long-term emissions target can seem abstract and distant, a national carbon budget could reframe the climate conversation around more tangible goals and advance the discussion on how each sector of the economy might fit into Canada’s low-carbon future.

Carbon budgets for provinces?

But the coalition’s proposal goes one significant step further by calling on the federal government to negotiate or set “sub-national carbon budgets” for each of the provinces.

In a perfectly rational world, that might be the smart way to structure climate policy in a federation — with each province accepting its fair share of the national goal. But anyone familiar with the nature of Canada’s federation — and the significant differences in emissions across provinces — knows how fraught and divisive such an exercise would be.

The Trudeau government consistently has side-stepped questions about regional differences and responsibility by focusing on national policy, like the federal carbon price. It’s hard to imagine the Liberals wanting to engage now in long and painful negotiations to set provincial carbon budgets.

A new federal climate change accountability act wouldn’t be entirely without precedent.

Thirteen years ago, Parliament adopted a private member’s bill — sponsored by Liberal MP Pablo Rodriguez, now the Government House leader — that established the Kyoto Protocol Implementation Act, despite the Conservative government’s objections.

The 14-page bill required the government to produce a plan for meeting Canada’s target under the Kyoto Protocol and to issue annual reports on progress toward that target. The National Roundtable on the Environment and the Economy — an independent body established by the Mulroney government — was tasked with analyzing the government’s plan, while the environment commissioner (whose office falls under the auditor general) was charged with providing a biannual assessment of the government’s progress.

That legislation was in effect for four years. But by 2012, the Conservatives had a majority in the House and they used it to withdraw from the Kyoto Protocol, repeal the act and abolish the NRTEE. (A private member’s bill that would have looked beyond Kyoto, originally proposed by former NDP leader Jack Layton, was killed in the Conservative-dominated Senate in 2010.)

‘A layer of durability’

The example of Rodriguez’s bill reminds us that no new climate legislation is necessarily guaranteed to survive a change in government. While there is a broad consensus on the need to reduce emissions in the United Kingdom, the debate in Canada is still polarized. And as long as it is, action on climate change will always hang in the balance.

Watch: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is questioned about climate conditions for pandemic business financing

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he expects oil and gas companies to share their environmental plans as part of a commitment to reduce emissions and fight climate change. 1:23

But legislation would be one more significant structural support for climate action that any future government would have to contend with — even if only by repealing it.

“Accountability frameworks aren’t silver bullets and won’t automatically solve the disconnect between policy and targets,” said Dale Beugin, vice president of research and analysis at the Institute for Climate Choices. “They do, however, add a layer of durability.

“Just as missing a milestone has reputational and political costs, so too would repealing legislation.”

The law’s success, in other words, might ultimately depend on whether Canadians themselves demand that it be upheld — and honoured.

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Coronavirus infections in Canada surpass 108,100 as global case count tops 13 million – Globalnews.ca

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The number of novel coronavirus case surpassed 108,100 on Monday, as worldwide infections topped 13 million.

Across the country, 366 new cases of COVID-19, and 12 additional deaths linked to the virus, were reported.

Ontario reported the most new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, with 116 new infections. The province also saw three additional deaths.

According to the province’s health authorities, 129 people have also recovered from the virus.

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So far, 1,712,315 people in Ontario have been tested for the novel coronavirus.

Meanwhile, in Quebec — the province hit hardest by the pandemic — 100 new infections were reported on Monday.

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According to provincial health authorities, one more person died.

So far, a total of 25,911 people have recovered from the virus in Quebec.

Saskatchewan reported 56 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday. The province has seen 15 coronavirus-related deaths since the pandemic began, and has tested more than 75,100 people.

So far, 766 people have recovered from the virus in Saskatchewan.






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Coronavirus: Toronto officials positive about remaining in stage 2 of provincial reopening plan


Coronavirus: Toronto officials positive about remaining in stage 2 of provincial reopening plan

Health authorities in Alberta reported 72 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, and said one more person had died, bringing the total death toll to 161.

More than 540,100 people have been tested for the virus, and 7,989 people have recovered from infections

Health officials in B.C reported 62 new cases of COVID-19 in the province over the last 72 hours, and two deaths, both which occurred in long-term care.

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There were 21 cases from Friday to Saturday, 20 cases Saturday to Sunday, and 21 from Sunday to Monday.

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So far the province has conducted 219,601 tests, and 2,718 people have recovered from the virus.

Neither New Brunswick nor Nova Scotia reported new cases of COVID-19 on Monday.

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In New Brunswick, 46,489 people have been tested for the virus and 163 people have recovered from infections.

Two people have died from the novel coronavirus in New Brunswick since the beginning of the pandemic.

A total of 58,741 people have been tested for COVID-19 in Nova Scotia, and 1,000 people have recovered from the virus.

Manitoba reported no new cases of COVID-19 and no new deaths related to the virus on Monday.

So far the province has conducted 71,559 tests for the virus and 317 people have recovered from infections.






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Harm reduction advocates claim the coronavirus pandemic has caused a surge in drug overdoses in Montreal


Harm reduction advocates claim the coronavirus pandemic has caused a surge in drug overdoses in Montreal

Health officials in Prince Edward Island said one new case of COVID-19 had been confirmed, but reported no new deaths on Monday.

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Since the pandemic began, 14,810 tests have been conducted and 27 people have recovered from the virus on the island.

Newfoundland reported no new cases of COVID-19 on Monday marking three full days without a new infection.

The province has tested 20,583 people for the virus so far, and 258 have recovered from infections.

According to health authorities, a total of three people have died as a result of COVID-19.

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Neither the Northwest Territories or Nunavut reported new cases of COVID-19 on Monday.

So far, the Northwest Territories has not seen any COVID-19-related deaths, and has tested 2,859 people for the virus.

A total of five people have recovered from infections in the territory.






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B.C. health officials use contract tracing in Kelowna COVID-19 outbreak


B.C. health officials use contract tracing in Kelowna COVID-19 outbreak

Meanwhile, in Nunavut, 1,553 tests have been conducted.

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No new cases of COVID-19 or deaths related to the virus were reported in Yukon on Monday.

An update on the Territory’s website says 1,343 people have been tested for the virus, and 11 people have recovered.

Global cases top 13 million

The pandemic reached another grim milestone on Monday, with more than 13 million confirmed cases reported globally.

According to a tally from John Hopkins University, by 8 p.m. ET on Monday, 13,060,239 cases of COVID-19 had been confirmed around the world.

Read more:
In just 5 days, coronavirus cases surged another million to 12M worldwide

COVID-19 cases have continued to increase in several places around the globe, including in the United States, which remained the epicentre of the virus on Monday.

The U.S. now has more than 3.3 million confirmed cases of COVID-19.






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Coronavirus: Trump says he has a ‘very good relationship’ with Dr. Fauci


Coronavirus: Trump says he has a ‘very good relationship’ with Dr. Fauci

Speaking to reporters outside Rideau Cottage in Ottawa on Monday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the “complex” situation in the U.S. means there is still no firm timetable, at this time, for when the border will be reopened to non-essential travel.

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Since the novel coronavirus was first detected in Wuhan, China, in December it has claimed more than 570,776 lives.

The virus forced mass closures around the globe and devastated the world economy.

In the last several months, however, many countries — including Canada — have made steps to gradually reopen.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Where the jobs are: Some sectors rebounding faster as Canada emerges from lockdown – CTV News

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TORONTO —
Jobs lost during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic are coming back – but not all at once, and not in the same order they disappeared.

Statistics Canada reported July 10 that more than 950,000 jobs were added in the country in June. While only a small fraction of the three million or so positions that were lost as lockdowns were imposed in March and April, the number represents a record increase as those measures are lifted.

“There’s a lot of places that are still hiring amidst all the doom and gloom that we’ve been experiencing over the past few months,” Carolyn Levy, president of the technologies division of staffing and recruitment agency Randstad Canada, told CTVNews.ca on Monday via telephone from Calgary.

Breaking down the numbers by industry yields clues into where the first wave of rebound hiring is taking place. More than 20 per cent of the added jobs were classified as wholesale and retail trade – with 16 per cent in accommodation and food services, 12 per cent in health care and social assistance, and eight per cent apiece in construction and manufacturing.

This suggests that the retail and restaurant workers who were among the first to be let go when their establishments were ordered to close were also among the first to be hired back when limited activity was allowed to resume.

There is still a long way to go before those sectors can be back to normal, though. In food services alone, it is believed that 400,000 Canadian jobs eliminated during the pandemic have yet to return. Many businesses in the broader service sector say they do not expect to ever return to pre-pandemic staffing levels.

Also notable, StatCan found, is that there were more wholesale jobs in Canada in June than there were in February, before the pandemic hit. Levy chalked this increase up to the surge in online shopping, which has left companies needing extra staff in warehouses and other parts of the supply chain.

On manufacturing, Levy said the increase could be due to companies retooling their lines to produce personal protective equipment or other items suddenly in demand due to the pandemic.

EMPLOYERS RETHINKING OLD ROLES

For the nearly 2.5 million Canadians who remain unemployed, though, knowing where hiring has recently happened only paints part of the picture. More helpful is information about where hiring is happening now.

According to the federal government’s job bank, the most in-demand jobs right now are sales associates, administrative assistants and customer service representatives, followed by truck drivers, general farm workers and light-duty cleaners.

A popular website used by job-seekers to connect with employers is seeing similar patterns. Brendon Bernard, an economist with the Indeed Hiring Lab, wrote July 7 that retail and customer service jobs are among those that saw the biggest drop in new postings on Indeed earlier in the pandemic, and have since seen some of the biggest rebounds.

“Sectors narrowing the gap relatively quickly in recent weeks include ones featuring lower-paying positions, like retail, and customer service,” he wrote.

“Areas posting roles with many mid-wage jobs have also seen noticeable bounce-backs, like construction, as well as education and instruction.”

Levy said that some employers are also creating new roles as they look to respond to their customers’ needs during and after the pandemic. Opportunities created by this include more positions for financial advisers, she said, as well as an even greater demand for tech workers.

Postings on Indeed for higher-paying jobs have been slower to bounce back, Bernard said. Indeed has tracked two categories where new job postings have fallen off since early May – security and public safety, and aviation.

Bernard reported that the number of new job postings on Indeed as of July 3 was 21 per cent lower than it had been one year earlier. That gap had been as large as 70 per cent in mid-April. Smaller provinces, which have generally been less affected by COVID-19, have kept job posting levels closer to where they were in 2019 than larger provinces.

Levy said she is seeing employers increasingly show interest in hiring for temporary contract positions. This benefits them because it allows them to avoid making long-term commitments in an uncertain environment, she said, but can also be good for those looking for jobs because it gives them a chance to find work that they might not otherwise have.

“Companies have had to take a step back and start to reimagine how they have to work in this new normal,” she said.

“Businesses have to look at what do we need to do to reskill, what do we need to do to retrain, given the way we operated our business four months ago is not the way it’s going to be … from now on.”

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Talks to extend Canada-U.S. border closure "ongoing," Trudeau says after call with Trump – CTV News

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OTTAWA —
With just one week to go until the current Canada-U.S. border closure agreement expires, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says border discussions with the U.S.  are “ongoing,” adding that he expects to have more to say later in the week.

This comes as Trudeau spoke to U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday morning, though the border was not among the range of topics the prime minister said the two world leaders discussed — despite the looming July 21 deadline.

“Every month we have been able to extend the border closures to all but essential goods and services and those discussions are ongoing with the United States right now as we are a week from the next deadline for closures,” Trudeau said.

“We’re going to continue to work hard to keep Canadians safe and to keep our economies flowing, we will have more to say later this week I’m sure.”

Canada has been under renewed pressure to reopen the shared border, despite surging COVID-19 case numbers in the United States. At the end of June, the U.S. became home to the world’s highest number of reported infections: more than 2.2 million. That number has since soared to more than 3.3 million, according to the New York Times, with more than 134,000 deaths.

Despite these figures, 29 bipartisan members of U.S. Congress penned an open letter to Public Safety Minister Bill Blair calling on the Canadian government to plan a phased reopening of the Canada-U.S. border and to consider easing existing measures.

“We are asking that the United States and Canada immediately craft a comprehensive framework for phased reopening of the border based on objective metrics and accounting for the varied circumstances across border regions,” read the letter, which was published on Western New York Congressman Brian Higgins’ website on July 3.

The members of Congress, who represent the northern states along the border, also implored the Canadian government to consider easing restrictions on family members and property owners impeded by the restrictions.

The Canadian government pushed back on the request, with Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland’s office telling CTVNews.ca in a statement that the health and safety of Canadians is “absolutely priority.”

“Decisions about Canada’s border are made by Canadians, for Canadians,” Freeland’s spokesperson Katherine Cuplinskas said  in the statement on Friday.

The suggestion was also unpopular with non-politician Canadians, who took to social media to express their staunch opposition.

In response to a tweet from Higgins, who had shared the open letter on his Twitter account, hundreds of Canadians slammed the suggestion.

“No thank you…clean up your backyard before you attempt to enter ours..sincerely Canada,” wrote a user who goes by the name @MichelletypoQ.

Another user, @rachelinTO, wrote that “most of our earliest cases came from the U.S. So……that’s a firm ‘no’. Sorry, eh.”

Users called the request “disastrous” and multiple accounts said they’d only be comfortable easing restrictions after seeing improvement in the number of COVID-19 cases in the U.S.

TRUMP, TRUDEAU DISCUSS TARIFF THREAT

While Trudeau did not give any indication in his press conference that he and Trump had touched on the border issue during their phone call on Monday, he did confirm that the two discussed a host of other issues — including China and the two detained Canadians, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the U.S. president’s renewed aluminium tariff threat.

“I impressed upon him that it would be a shame to see tariffs come in between our two countries at a time where we’re celebrating NAFTA , and at a time where we want our businesses and our manufacturers to get going as quickly as possible,” Trudeau said.

“We pledged to keep working on it together.”

Trudeau also said he told Trump that the pandemic had disrupted the usual supply chains and manufacturing processes, but that this disruption is slowly subsiding.

“That is starting to realign itself, given the economies are starting up again and manufacturing is getting going,” Trudeau said.

CTV News confirmed the possibility of the U.S. slapping another set of tariffs on Canada at the end of June. The tariffs would fall under Section 232 of the U.S. Trade Expansion Act, and the threat comes amid U.S. claims that their aluminum market is being flooded by Canadian product.

Two Canadian sources told CTV News at the time that the announcement is possible in the coming weeks, though to date no formal announcement of tariffs has transpired.

Should the U.S. decide to re-impose tariffs on Canada, it would reopen a trade rift between the two countries that had been healing since a spat just over a year ago, that saw the U.S. impose tariffs on steel and aluminum and Canada answer with tariffs on a wide array of U.S. products including quiche, mayonnaise, and toilet paper.

Trudeau has been outspoken in his defence of Canada’s aluminum industry, noting when the possibility of the U.S. imposing new tariffs emerged recently, that the U.S. “needs Canadian aluminum” and would only be hurting its own economy.

“Our economies are so interlinked that punitive actions by the United States administration end up hurting Americans the same way they end up hurting Canadians,” Trudeau said at the time.

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