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With GitHub, Canadian company TELUS aims to bring 'focus, flow and joy' to developers – Transform – Microsoft

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Katie Peters could have used an advocate as she embarked on her tech career.

In her first year at the University of British Columbia, Peters’ computer science classes were split almost evenly along gender lines. But most of her female classmates soon switched majors, and by Peters’ final year there were typically only two or three women in those classes. She felt increasingly isolated and was uncomfortable asking for help.

After graduating with a computer science degree in 2012, Peters took a job as a software developer for TELUS, a Canadian telecommunications company. Joining an organization with more than 90,000 employees, Peters initially found it challenging to make her way around its procedures and structure. So when the position of staff developer opened on TELUS’ new engineering productivity team last fall, Peters jumped at the opportunity.

“I wanted to be the person that I wish could have helped me,” says Peters, who started in the role last October. “There are so many complicated processes in a company as large as TELUS and it’s really difficult to navigate. You end up feeling stupid a lot of the time and you have to ask lots of questions. I don’t want other people to have to experience that. I want to make that better.”

Peters is ‘a brilliant developer and a brilliant technologist,’ says Justin Watts, head of TELUS’ engineering productivity team.

Peters is now helping lead an initiative aimed at changing TELUS’ culture to better empower its developers. Much of that effort is focused on encouraging widespread adoption of Microsoft’s code-hosting platform GitHub to help automate software development at TELUS and make it easier for the company’s roughly 4,000 developers to collaborate. TELUS recently made GitHub available companywide and signed an agreement with Microsoft to help manage its enterprise-level use of the platform and provide GitHub training to developers.

Justin Watts, head of developer experience for TELUS, says Peters’ experience as both a developer and a previous member of TELUS’ enterprise architecture team makes her ideally suited to help redefine the company’s approach to software development.

“This is all being driven by Katie and the vision she has,” says Watts, who heads the engineering productivity team. “Katie is great at capturing that relationship with the developer and what our goals are. She is a brilliant developer and a brilliant technologist.

“She’s seen as a really senior, influential mind in the company.”

Justin Watts, head of the engineering productivity team at TELUS.
Justin Watts.

Peters is already shaking things up. Drawing inspiration from “The Unicorn Project,” a 2019 novel by Gene Kim about a group of renegade developers seeking to overthrow the existing order and make work more fulfilling, Peters has replaced the usual staid presentation decks with ones featuring swirling designs, pink and purple tones and cartoon unicorns, and adopted the book’s mantra of bringing “focus, flow and joy” to developers.

Transform recently chatted with Peters over Microsoft Teams from her home in Vancouver, where she lives with her husband and 2-year-old daughter. The interview has been condensed for clarity and length.

TRANSFORM: Why was the engineering productivity team formed and what is its mission?

PETERS: We’ve been transitioning to the cloud for software development for a while, but it’s challenging. It greatly simplifies very complicated operations activities and turns those things into code. So instead of needing an ops professional to manually create a bespoke server for the developer to host their application, the definition of that server is standardized and codified in a way that can be stored and managed alongside the application code.

That makes it easier for a developer to manage it themselves, but they’re now expected to own that server definition, where sometimes they’ve never previously had exposure to the ops side of software development. That’s a really difficult transition for people. And a lot of legacy processes haven’t caught up to cloud development yet. We’re giving developers a lot more freedom, but it’s also a lot more responsibility in different areas than they might not have had experience in before. So we have to make that not a burden for them.

Our team exists to help developers make that cloud transition and to update all of that legacy process baggage to align with the new cloud paradigm.

TRANSFORM: Why did TELUS see a need to change how software development is done?

PETERS: We need to stay innovative and creative. We need to be able to react quickly to the market, and if we want to be able to do that, we need to give developers the time and the space and the safety to do that while also making sure that what they’re building is secure and reliable.

Streetscape photo showing the exterior of TELUS' headquarters in Vancouver, B.C.
TELUS’ headquarters in downtown Vancouver, British Columbia.

To enable us to move quickly without sacrificing security and reliability, we need to really make that developer experience our focus. I treat it as the developers are my customers, and what experiences can I give them so that they are inspired to keep pushing and keep innovating, and just unblock them as much as I can, to make it as simple and fast as I can so that they can keep innovating.

TRANSFORM: What role can GitHub play in helping developers shift to this new cloud paradigm?

PETERS: GitHub used to be just for storing the source code, but now it has a lot of other features. When you’re writing code, for example, you need to be able to plan that work and distribute it to people. We can use GitHub projects for that.

After you’ve developed code, there are tools you can use to tell you if there are problems with how you’ve written it. In the past, we would wait until we were trying to release that code to our customers before we would run those tests. So when things went wrong, it was really costly. Now, developers can push their code back to the public repository on GitHub for the rest of the team to see. Then we can run all of these automated tests and security scans, so it’s easier to make fixes right then, whereas in the old world, it was potentially months later they would get that feedback.

With GitHub taking over that developer lifecycle, that allows us to build in a lot of automation so we have end-to-end visibility on where developers are spending their time and what they’re doing. That’s good for metrics on how we can improve that experience and make it better for people.

TRANSFORM: GitHub is ultimately a tool. What other components are you thinking about in driving this cultural shift at TELUS?

PETERS: As a big company, TELUS can be a little formal. It’s hard for people to ask for help. We really wanted to change that culture. We wanted to be open and approachable and let people vent to us in a psychologically safe place to share their problems. That way, we can understand all the little things that add up to so much toil.

Photo of Katie Peters working at a computer in TELUS' headquarters and showing a slide with a unicorn from one of her signature presentation decks.
Peters draws inspiration from ‘The Unicorn Project,’ a novel about a group of renegade developers.

We have a lot of really creative people at TELUS, a lot of talented developers, and they come up with really interesting ways to deal with the status quo that don’t actually fix the problem for anyone else — it’s just a workaround that they’ve developed. We need people to feel safe coming to us with their problems and trust that we can help them solve them, so that we can then bring that to everybody and drive that improvement across the board.

TRANSFORM: How did your interest in computers start?

PETERS: My parents really wanted me to be interested in computers, so they bought me my own computer when I was a kid. They got me into robot building camps and software development camps and all sorts of stuff.

I started playing video games when I was 4 years old. I played Putt-Putt Goes to the Moon and Fatty Bear’s Birthday Surprise. I loved all sorts of video games. Morrowind was another big game for me. They had a modding community, and I learned a lot about computers in general by participating in that community. (Modding refers to the practice of altering content or creating new content for video games.)

I wanted to work in the video game industry, but when I was applying for co-op placements during university, I got into Sierra Wireless (a Canadian IoT solutions provider). As I was exposed to that industry, I liked the consistency and stability of the telco industry and the feeling that you’re contributing to something important. Providing internet to people is really important.

TRANSFORM: You said you felt at times like you have imposter syndrome. Did you feel that way particularly as a female developer?

PETERS: I’ve always had a lot of imposter syndrome, which I think is true for a lot of software developers. I’m not unique in that way. I do think it’s worse as a woman, but I think it’s just common in software development to have those kinds of feelings. The industry is kind of steeped in this mythology of like, really smart geeks who live and breathe computer science and build Google or Microsoft in their basement, and they’re all geniuses and always know everything about everything.

Photo taken at TELUS headquarters in Vancouver, B.C., showing two interior offices with chairs grouped around tables and views out windows.
TELUS, which employs around 4,000 developers, is using GitHub to transform its approach to software development.

There are really high expectations in the software industry in general, and I think everybody experiences that, but I think it’s amplified for a woman. Because the expectation, I think, at least when I started in the industry, was that I don’t actually know what I’m doing. I’m a poseur and I just got my place because I’m a woman. So I had to work really hard to appear extra smart. 

TRANSFORM: Is it important to you, as a woman in this role, to attract more female developers to the field? 

PETERS: Absolutely. When you’re the only woman, it can be really challenging. And when you have one or two women in a large group, sometimes you can be forced into this weird sense of competition with them. People are always comparing you to the other women.

But when there’s a critical mass of women, you really get to be comfortable working with other women who typically come from the same kinds of experiences. You get to open up a little bit in a way that you might not have been able to otherwise. Most women I encounter in computer science are so supportive and friendly.

It always makes me happy to see more women in the industry. Any opportunity I have to try to make that easier for somebody or to help somebody go in that direction, I’m very happy to be able to do that.

Top photo: Katie Peters stands on a deck at TELUS’ headquarters in Vancouver, B.C. (Justin Watts photo courtesy of Justin Watts; all other photos by Jennifer Gauthier)

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New Whyte E160 focused on performance with oh-so-low centre of gravity – BikeRadar

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All-new frame is built around Bosch’s Smart System 750Wh battery and Performance Line CX motor

British bike brand Whyte’s newest E-160 electric mountain bike has been tweaked and refined as Whyte seeks to hone its focus on lowering its centre of gravity (COG).

The brand claims the changes improve how the bike rides, making it feel closer to a non-assisted bike, while also making battery removal and installation easier.

The 150mm rear-travel emtb range now includes a full 29in-wheel bike and a dedicated mullet setup, where the front is 29in and the rear 27.5in, both available in medium to extra-large sizes. The extra-small and small sizes get 27.5in hoops front and rear, making them a better fit for smaller riders.

Could the E-160 RSX soon be the ebike to beat?
Alex Evans / Our Media

The move from Bosch’s Performance Line CX motor with basic Purion display to the Smart System and redesigned down tube sees an increase in battery capacity, with space for up to a 750Wh unit, plus increased smartphone connectivity.

Prices start at £6,399 for the E-160 S 29er and MX, rising to £7,699 for the mullet-only E-160 RS, and top out at £7,999 for the E-160 RSX, which is sold with 29in wheels only.

2022 Whyte E-160 frame and suspension

The down tube doesn’t have a large cut-out for the battery. This, Whyte claims, improves stiffness.
Alex Evans / Our Media

Whyte’s focus on lowering the E-160’s COG is founded in the belief doing so will “dramatically improv[e] the ride performance by minimising the… negative effects of poor weight distribution in three main areas… pitch, roll and yaw.”

In order to investigate the importance of lowering the bike’s centre of gravity with the aim of improving the way it rides, Whyte used computer-modelling software to cut the bike into portions, giving each section its own COG.

Each section’s centre of gravity is then averaged out to produce the whole bike’s centroid (arithmetic mean position of all points). The aim was to make this as low as possible.

The Bosch motor has been rotated (clockwise in this image) so the battery can fit beneath it, lowering the bike’s centre of gravity.
Alex Evans / Our Media

Along with the anti-clockwise rotation of the motor (when seen from the driveside) – used on all current Whyte full-suspension ebikes, so the battery can be mounted beneath the motor – the brand has managed to lower the battery further for the latest E-160 by relocating the connector from the bottom of the battery to the top.

This, Whyte claims, culminates in a ride “that feels much more like… an ‘acoustic’ bike,” with a planted feel while maintaining the ability to change direction quickly.

Righty-tighty, lefty-loosey.
Alex Evans / Our Media

Whyte is also keen to highlight its down tube’s design that remains intact, without the cut-out used on many other brands’ designs for battery installation or removal.

The “uncompromised” down tube means it retains its torsional stiffness and structural importance.

For the 2022 bike, the down tube has been re-profiled and hydroformed to fit tightly around Bosch’s 750Wh battery, that slides into the down tube using Bosch’s slide-in-rail system.

The new E-160 uses the chunky 1.5in and 1.8in headset standard.
Alex Evans / Our Media

Because the system is modular, owners can swap between 750Wh, 625Wh and 500Wh Power Tube battery sizes without having to buy a whole new bike.

The brand has moved to the 1.5in upper cup and 1.8in lower cup headset standard, while making changes to the internal cable and electric wire routing. The E-160 now uses SRAM’s UDH, too.

Suspension

The four-bar Horst-link suspension design has around 25 per cent progression.
Alex Evans / Our Media

Although the new E-160 still uses Whyte’s Horst-link four-bar suspension – dubbed Quad-Link 4 Suspension by the brand – found on its other full-suspension bikes, it has worked hard to tune the bike’s shock damper tunes.

Whyte said its in-house enduro racer and engineer Sam Shucksmith helped develop the tune on both Fox and RockShox shocks fitted to the bike, going through many iterations to find the perfect performer.

The E-160 has 150mm of rear-wheel travel and, like its full-suspension stablemates, the overall rate of progression of its travel is around 25 per cent.

2022 Whyte E-160 motor and battery

The charge port sits on top of the motor.
Alex Evans / Our Media

Bosch’s Smart System Performance Line CX motor and 750Wh battery are fitted to the 2022 E-160, although, as mentioned, the frame is compatible with the smaller 625Wh and 500Wh batteries, too.

The motor boasts 85Nm of torque and 250w of assistance, and via Bluetooth connectivity thanks to the Smart System, the motor’s modes can be adjusted in Bosch’s Flow smartphone app.

This latest generation also features Tour+ mode. This functions similarly to eMTB mode, where increased rider inputs make the motor provide more assistance.

SRAM Code RSC brakes take care of slowing down the E-160.
Alex Evans / Our Media

However, none of the E-160 bikes are fitted with a Bosch display. Instead, an LED controller – with battery and mode indicator – is fitted to the left-hand side of the handlebars. A Bosch Smart System display can be added as an aftermarket upgrade, however.

2022 Whyte E-160 geometry

The E-160 is enduro-race ready.
Alex Evans / Our Media

Bike geometry across manufacturers seems to be converging on what is becoming a universally agreed sweet spot, where bikes with those perfect figures tend to ride well.

The 2022 E-160 doesn’t buck the trend, its figures looking spot-on for a trail/enduro ebike.

Headline numbers include a 64.2-degree head tube angle (low setting), 75.3-degree actual seat tube angle, 446mm chainstays and a 483mm reach figure for the size large.

Whyte E-160 29in wheel geometry

Whyte E-160 MX/mullet wheel geometry

Whyte E-160 27.5in wheel geometry

The range features a wide gamut of sizes, from extra-small to extra-large. The XS and S bikes run 27.5in wheels front and rear, while the medium to extra-large bikes can be fitted with either 29in wheels front and rear, or a mullet or MX setup.

The Shape.it Link has high and low positions. This adjusts geometry, and can be used so a rider can swap between 29in and 27.5in rear wheels.
Alex Evans / Our Media

Like its other full-suspension bikes, it’s fitted with the Shape.it Link – a small flip chip in the shock yoke that switches between high and low positions. Whyte says the link slackens the bike out by 0.6 degrees and lowers the bottom bracket by 8mm.

The link’s secondary function is to allow the frame to accommodate a 27.5in rear wheel, transforming it into a mullet bike. All E-160s, whether they’re sold as a mullet or 29in-wheeled bike, can be changed to the other wheel configuration without any additional purchases.

2022 Whyte E-160 models, specifications and prices

In the 2022 E-160 range are three models, with the base E-160 S model retailing for £6,399 in both 29in and MX wheel configurations, along with a full 27.5in-wheeled bike for the smaller sizes.

This is fitted with a RockShox ZEB fork and Super Deluxe Select R rear shock. Braking is taken care of by TRP’s Trail Evo, while Shimano’s ebike-specific XT M8130 Linkglide drivetrain features.

The bike’s finishing kit – including dropper, saddle, bar, stem and grips – is Whyte-branded.

Sitting in the middle of the line-up is the E-160 RS, available with a mullet-wheel setup or full 27.5in for the extra-small and small sizes.

This model retails for £7,699, and is specced with a Fox 38 Performance fork and Float Performance DPS rear shock.

Drivetrain duties are taken care of by SRAM GX Eagle AXS (like the RSX model), and it’s fitted with WTB HRZ i30 rims laced to unbranded hubs. Elsewhere, there’s a Crankbrothers Highline 3 dropper post and a mix of Whyte and branded kit. SRAM Code R brakes provide the stopping power.

Headlining the range is the E-160 RSX, costing £7,999, but available only with 29in wheels.

It’s available in orange or black, where the colours of the logos and main frame are flipped.
Alex Evans / Our Media

This comes with Fox Float 38 Performance Elite forks with 160mm of travel and a Float X Performance Elite rear shock. Elsewhere, it has a SRAM GX Eagle AXS drivetrain and a Crankbrothers Highline 3 dropper post.

In the UK market, it’s fitted with Hope’s Fortus 30 wheels, while other territories get DT Swiss’ HX 1700s. The wheels are wrapped in Maxxis rubber, with an Assegai 3C MaxxGrip EXO+ front tyre and a Minion DHR II 3C MaxxTerra DoubleDown at the rear.

Stopping is done by SRAM’s Code RSC brakes with a 220mm front rotor and a 200mm rear.

2022 Whyte E-160 RSX 29er

  • Frame: 6061-T6 alloy, 150mm travel
  • Shock: Fox Float X Performance Elite
  • Fork: Fox Float 38 Performance Elite, 160mm travel
  • Drivetrain: SRAM GX Eagle AXS
  • Wheels/tyres: Hope Fortus 30 on Hope Pro 4 hubs / Maxxis Assegai 3C MaxxGrip EXO+ WT TR 29×2.5in (f), Maxxis Minion DHR II 3C MaxxTerra DoubleDown WT TR 29×2.4in (r)
  • Brakes: SRAM Code RSC 220mm front, 200mm rear rotors
  • Bar/stem/grips: Whyte Custom 6061 Alloy 800mm / Whyte Enduro Stem 35mm / Whyte lock-on Enduro
  • Seatpost/saddle: Crankbrothers Highline 3 / Fizik Terra Aidon
  • Price: £7,999

2022 Whyte E-160 RS MX

  • Frame: 6061-T6 alloy, 150mm travel
  • Shock: Fox Float Performance DPS
  • Fork: Fox Float 38 Performance, 160mm travel
  • Drivetrain: SRAM GX Eagle AXS
  • Wheels/tyres: WTB HTZ i30 TCS 2.0 on Alloy hubs / Maxxis Assegai 3C MaxxGrip EXO+ WT TR 29×2.5in/27.5×2.5in (f), Maxxis Minion DHR II 3C MaxxTerra DoubleDown WT TR 27.5×2.4in (r)
  • Brakes: SRAM Code R 220mm front, 200mm rear rotors
  • Bar/stem/grips: Whyte Custom 6061 Alloy 800mm / Whyte Enduro Stem 35mm / Whyte lock-on Enduro
  • Seatpost/saddle: Crankbrothers Highline 3 / Fizik Terra Aidon
  • Price: £6,399

2022 Whyte E-160 S MX or 29er

  • Frame: 6061-T6 alloy, 150mm travel
  • Shock: RockShox Deluxe Select R
  • Fork: RockShox ZEB, 160mm travel
  • Drivetrain: Shimano Deore XT M8130 Linkglide
  • Wheels/tyres: WTB HTZ i30 TCS 2.0 on Alloy hubs / Maxxis Assegai 3C MaxxGrip EXO+ WT TR 29×2.5in/27.5×2.5in (f), Maxxis Minion DHR II 3C MaxxTerra DoubleDown WT TR 27.5×2.4in (r)
  • Brakes: TRP Trail Evo 220mm front, 200mm rear rotors
  • Bar/stem/grips: Whyte Custom 6061 Alloy 800mm / Whyte Enduro Stem 35mm / Whyte lock-on Enduro
  • Seatpost/saddle: Whyte Drop.it Adjust / Whyte Custom
  • Price: £7,699

2022 Whyte E-160 RSX 29er ride impressions

Whyte has worked hard to lower the bike’s centre of gravity to improve its handling.
Alex Evans / Our Media

I was lucky enough to ride the Whyte E-160 RSX 29er on my local test loop, taking in some of the best off-piste trails at the Glentress trail centre in Scotland’s Tweed Valley. Although I only managed a single 1,190m ascent/descent, 25km distance ride, I was able to get some good initial impressions of the bike.

The E-160 felt very similar to the E-180 RS I reviewed in BikeRadar’s Bike of the Year test, but with the increased control and grip afforded by the larger 29in wheels.

This meant it felt super-smooth on particularly rough, choppy terrain with the improved roll-over of big hoops, increasing how fast it could be ridden before control was reduced.

This made it addictive to ride quickly, where the Float X’s rear shock felt as though it was doing a great job of improving grip and ironing out the worst of the bumps. In fact, this was the best-feeling Float X I’ve ridden, where the weight and speed of an electric bike wasn’t able to overwhelm the damper’s performance.

Furthermore, the front-to-back balance – with the relatively long 446mm chainstays and 823mm front centre creating a 1,269mm wheelbase – gave a very intuitive ride from the get-go.

It was easy to hop on the E-160 and ride fast and confidently. The low-slung weight, suspension performance, spot-on geometry and spec list – that included the impeccable MaxxGrip Assegai front tyre with EXO+ casing and DoubleDown DHR II MaxxTerra at the rear – worked perfectly together.

The bottom bracket felt a touch on the low side. This was great for cornering confidence, but I did encounter a few pedal strikes.

On the climbs, I felt as though the seat tube angle could have been steeper, but this wasn’t a big issue compared to some bikes.

With Bosch’s Smart System 750Wh Power Tube battery fitted to Mondraker’s Level R, it feels as if it drains its power quicker than the 625Wh battery fitted to a basic Performance Line CX motor. More investigation is required here, however.

The proof of the Whyte’s performance was, however, in the pudding.

Although this evidence should be taken with a pinch of salt, I managed to beat all my current personal records on my test loop during the single ride I spent on the 2022 E-160 RSX. Make of that what you will, but it at least suggests Whyte’s latest ebike is an impressive bit of kit.

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Instagram may soon turn your videos into Reels – Times of India

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Reels is one of the most popular and used features of Instagram. The Meta-owned platform is now testing a feature which would turn video posts into Reels. The report adds that the company is presently testing the feature with some select users around the world.
According to a report by TechCrunch, a Meta spokesperson confirmed to the publication that Instagram is presently testing a new update which will turn the video posts into Instagram Reels. The Instagram spokesperson told TechCrunch, “We’re testing this feature as part of our efforts to simplify and improve the video experience on Instagram.” With this new feature in place, the popular social networking platform is planning to simplify the video content on the platform.
The report further adds that Instagram is presently testing this upcoming feature with some select users around the globe. Matt Navarra, a social media analyst, also shared some screenshots of this upcoming feature on Twitter.
It is believed that the users who are part of the testing group will see a pop-up message as shown in the screenshot. The prompt mentions that if the account is public and you share a video then other users will be able to use its audio to create their own Reels. The message also reads that anyone can remix a user’s Reel and also download it as part of their remix.
Instagram has not yet revealed any timeline for the rollout of this new feature. But it is soon expected to be available for all.

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Oppo Reno 8 lineup is set to be released in July, to feature a powerful Neural Processing Unit – Firstpost

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Oppo is preparing to launch their latest iteration of the Reno series on July 21. While the company has confirmed that the Reno 8 and Reno 8 Pro will be launched in India in a couple of weeks there has been no confirmation around the dates. An online tipster has suggested that the launch would take place on July 21.

The Reno 8 Pro packs the MariSilicon X NPU a neural processing unit and supports 4K ultra night videography. The Reno 8 Pro’s Chinese version is being powered by a Snapdragon 7 Gen 1 chipset, but the Indian model will likely use the MediaTek Dimensity 8100-Max SoC, reported Moneycontrol.

For those unaware, the Chinese smartphone maker had announced this chip back in December 2021 for its flagship Find X series. Now, this same NPU will be making its way to the Reno 8 series as well. While there were rumours that had revealed this information before, the brand has officially shared the news along with some improvements in its MariSilicon X platform. As per official notes, the 6nm MariSilicon X NPU will help bring end-to-end imaging solutions to the Reno 8 series.

Thanks to proprietary algorithms, the company has developed a new way to better render Indian skin tones accurately and even create Bokeh Flare Portrait videos as well. Oppo’s AI can even distinguish between skin blemishes and beauty spots, while smartly applying a different level of beautification and skin smoothening based on the age and gender of the subject. Its optimizations for the Indian market will also help improve HDR performance across wide exposure shots without user intervention.

Talking about the NPU itself, the company took 3 years to develop the chipset and it consisted of over 400 patent applications. It packs 3.6 billion transistors and can perform up to 18 trillion operations per second (18 TOPS). It is built on the 6nm process and is also capable of real-time lossless AI processing in the Bayer RAW domain with images taken from the 50MP Sony IMX766 primary camera.

As for the other specs, we can expect the regular Oppo Reno 8 to come with a 6.43-inch AMOLED display and a 120Hz refresh rate. Powering the device will be a MediaTek Dimensity 1300 SoC, The NPU-backed 50MP primary sensor, up to 256GB of UFS 3.1 storage and a 4,500 mAh battery that offers 80 W Super Flash Charge fast charging.

OPPO is expected to confirm more details as we get closer to the launch date.

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