Connect with us

Health

York Region records first COVID-19 death – CP24 Toronto's Breaking News

Published

on


York Region health officials say a Markham woman in her 70s died of COVID-19, making her the second reported coronavirus fatality in the GTA on Sunday.

The woman is York region’s first COVID-19 related death. Earlier, the City of Toronto reported its first death related to COVID-19, bringing Ontario’s death toll to five.

Dr. Karim Kurji, York Region’s Medical Officer of Health, said the woman came back from Los Angeles but had previously travelled to France and Tahiti.

He said she was picked up at the airport by her son and daughter-in-law. After arriving at her son’s home, the woman collapsed, Kurji said.

The coroner later confirmed that the woman died from COVID-19, Kurji said. It is not yet known where she contracted the virus.

“Sometimes individuals escape detection. I think the last modelling study that I saw from the London School of Hygiene seemed to suggest that about 42 per cent of individuals who may be infectious tend to get through these screening measures,” Kurji said.

He said both the son and the daughter-in-law are in self-isolation.

“York Region extends their deepest condolences to the family and loved ones of the individual,” said Kurji. “This case speaks to the seriousness of the current situation and how as a community we need to continue working together to protect one another.”

“There is local transmission occurring in York region,” he said. “It is extremely important that the messages around social distance and measures around that are really followed by our residents.”

Kurji said the first COVID-19 case in the region has fully recovered, and several other individuals are now completely asymptomatic.

Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti is calling for the provincial and federal governments to close all non-essential businesses over COVID-19 concerns.

The first COVID-19 death was a 77-year-old man from Barrie who died on March 17. Two days later, a Milton man in his 50s became Ontario’s second COVID-19 fatality.

A close contact of the first fatality, a Barrie man in his 70s, died on Saturday due to the virus.

As of Sunday afternoon, there are 425 COVID-19 cases in Ontario.

COVID-19 outbreak declared at Markham nursing home

There are seven new cases confirmed Sunday, bringing the region’s total to 44. It includes the confirmed case at Markhaven Home for Seniors.

A COVID-19 outbreak has been declared in the nursing home, which means anyone with symptoms is assumed to be a positive COVID-19 case, Kurji said.

“So our investigation here is ongoing, but I want to re-emphasize that the past record of this facility’s excellent and they have managed many outbreaks before and we are confident that that will continue to happen,” he said.

Kurji said they have been interviewing all staff and have been providing education sessions.

He said a detailed guidance have also been distributed to other long-term care facilities in the region to ensure that all are ready to respond to COVID-19.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Winnipeg lupus patients on edge amid shortage of drug at centre of COVID-19 trials – CBC.ca

Published

on


An unproven claim a drug used to treat lupus can combat COVID-19 is causing an increase in prescriptions of the drug, creating shortages and putting Winnipeggers who rely on it on edge. 

Elena Anciro was diagnosed with lupus eighteen years ago and relies on taking hydroxychloroquine daily in order to function without being in intense pain, and to reduce the flare-ups that make it hard to get out of bed.

“People have called this medication ‘lupus life insurance,'” Anciro said. “It is vital.”

While the drug was created in the 1950’s to treat malaria, it is commonly prescribed to control inflammation and pain for those with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. 

However, it came to the forefront in the fight against COVID-19 thanks to a famous tweet by U.S President Donald Trump.

The tweet sent earlier this month heralded it as a possible way to treat COVID-19.

It sent people scrambling to get their hands on the drug, causing a spike in prescriptions in Manitoba and a dire warning from the province’s health regulators — it was being over-prescribed and now they are facing “serious shortages.” 

“Due to the recent yet-to-be-proven claims of effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine sulfate against COVID-19 and the growth in prescribing for it, we are now faced with a very serious shortage (and some brands, outages) of the product,” read a March 26 notice co-authored by the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Nurses and Pharmacists.

“This presents very serious challenges for long-term continuity of care for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.”

Manitoba reports spike in prescriptions of hydroxychloroquine

According to the notice there has been a “significant increase” in Manitoba over the past two weeks in the number of prescriptions written and dispensed for hydroxychloroquine and Kaletra — an antiretroviral used to treat HIV.

As part of mandatory reporting requirements, a drug shortage report was given to Health Canada on March 19 by the drugs’ manufacturer, Apotex Inc. It cited the shortage was due to “demand increase” for the drug.

Anciro is just one of the 15,000 Canadians who have lupus, an autoimmune disease that cause severe inflammation of the joints among other symptoms. A further 300,000 Canadians have rheumatoid arthritis, many of whom also rely on the drug to function in their lives. 

“When Trump announced that and this all happened, to have to not only worry about getting this sick from this highly contagious virus, [but also] having to worry about the pills that allow me to be well, is very stressful,” said Anciro.

Stephanie Corbett has lupus and says if she wasn’t able to take the drug, she would have to be hospitalized and would be in immense pain. (Supplied)

Stephanie Corbett is another Winnipegger who takes hydroxychloroquine daily to treat lupus. The mother of five was diagnosed with lupus nine years ago and says without the drug, she’d likely end up in the hospital.

So far, both have been able to fill their prescription without any issues. Both say it would take weeks for the drug to leave their system, but when it does, it’ll be devastating.

“It will be life-threatening for people like me,” said Corbett. 

“I’ll end up in the hospital. The rashes will start. The pain will get worse. You know, every symptom will start rearing.”

Clinical trial at U of M

While a clinical trial is currently underway at the University of Manitoba to see if hydroxychloroquine can be repurposed to reduce the severity of COVID-19, there are currently no approved treatments or vaccines for the virus.

Virologist Jason Kindrachuk says the key message for Manitobans is they need to wait and see the outcomes of these trials before jumping to conclusions.

“The data is simply not there. I’m not arguing for or against it. I’m just saying that right now we don’t have data to support that it is actually truly beneficial for patients,” said Kindrachuk, an associate professor at the University of Manitoba and Canada research chair in emerging viruses.

Jason Kindrachuk of the University of Manitoba says the scientific community needs to explain that they are still studying these drugs and don’t know all their benefits or possible negative affects. (Jaison Empson/CBC)

He says the scientific community needs to do a better job of communicating to the public the proven benefits of a drug.

“Our biggest concern is that we don’t want to give people false hope if we truly don’t know whether or not there’s a benefit, because, again, we can have a position where people are demanding hydroxychloroquine,” Kindrachuk said 

CBC reported last week that medical regulators across the country were seeing overprescription of drugs such as hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin, another drug being studied as part of the fight against COVID-19.

Regulators reported an increase in orders for the drugs from doctors who list it as “for office use.” These requests are typically from doctors who want to keep a supply on hand for future use, raising concerns that stockpiling was occurring. 

The Manitoba College of Physicians and Surgeons cautioned its members against stockpiling, warning that it may be reviewing prescriptions of these drugs and “prescribers must be able to demonstrate good medical care.”  

“These drugs have an intended use and prescribing these drugs as a precautionary measure leads to drug shortages and is compromising care for other patients,” the College wrote on Thursday.

Chief provincial public health officer Dr. Brent Roussin talks about a new Manitoba clinical trial looking at the effectiveness of using hydroxychloroquine, which has been used for malaria and other conditions, to treat COVID-19. 1:16

A warning was only given to nurses from their regulator, warning them not to prescribe Hydroxychloroquine or azithromycin to treat COVID-19.

“Nurses have an obligation to ensure that their practice and any treatment they prescribe is evidence-informed,” wrote the College of Nurses. 

Both Corbett and Anciro say they understand Manitobans are gravitating to the drug because they are scared. 

“But as of right now, there is nothing saying that the public should to be taking it,” said Corbett.

“So leave the drug for the people with the diseases that are taking it and that need it to survive.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

FDA OK's Addition To Stockpile Of Malaria Drugs For COVID-19 – KCCU

Published

on


Over the weekend, the Food and Drug Administration granted two malaria drugs “emergency use authorization” for the treatment of COVID-19. The move makes it easier to add the medicines to the strategic stockpile, which can be drawn upon in the current public health emergency.

The drugs — chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine — have been identified as potential COVID-19 treatments based on lab tests and small, limited studies in humans.

But gold standard clinical trials in the United States only just got underway. Preliminary results from those studies aren’t expected for weeks or months.

One thing is for sure, the FDA decision doesn’t reflect an official determination that the drugs work against the coronavirus.

“This is not FDA approval of hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine for the treatment of COVID-19,” says epidemiologist Rajesh Gandhi, who is leading Massachusetts General Hospital’s COVID-19 treatment task force. “There’s an epidemic of misinformation out there, and we need to combat that.”

The emergency use authorization only applies to the supply of these two drugs in the Strategic National Stockpile, the government’s storehouses of emergency medical supplies located in warehouses throughout the country.

Hospitals would need to request access to the drugs through their states, and the medicines would only be distributed to patients who have been hospitalized and tested positive for COVID-19, but for whom a “clinical trial is not available, or participation is not feasible,” according to the FDA.

“It’s nice to know that they have it in the event we’re running low or going to run out,” says Onisis Stefas, chief pharmacy officer at Northwell Health in New York, where doctors are already using the drug for patients who can’t be enrolled in clinical trials. “It’s good to have this as backup.”

The emergency use authorization won’t affect patients seeking this drug from their local pharmacies, where shortages have been reported.

Sandoz, the generic and biosimilar arm of drugmaker Novartis, donated 30 million doses of hydroxychloroquine to the stockpile. Bayer Pharmaceuticals donated 1 million doses of chloroquine. The Department of Health and Human Services announced on Sunday that it accepted these doses “for possible use in treating patients hospitalized with COVID-19 or for use in clinical trials.”

President Trump began promoting both drugs at his daily coronavirus press briefings earlier this month, prompting a spike in hydroxychloroquine prescriptions and concern about shortages and accidental poisonings.

If the drugs were helpful, doctors would be pleased to have a treatment option.

“We were told patients with COVID-19 who received this drug cleared the virus better than patients that did not receive the drug,” says Francois Nosten, who directs the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit in Thailand, and has been working with chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine for decades. “But it’s not sufficient information to be sure that this drug can be used or should be used in treating patients more widely.”

Preliminary findings often don’t pan out.

“The whole history of infectious disease is littered with drugs we all thought were going to be promising but turned out … not to be,” Mass General’s Gandhi says, adding that some of these medicines even turned out to be harmful.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Ontario nursing home sees 7 coronavirus deaths, 24 staff infected – 680 News

Published

on


An Ontario health unit says one nursing home has seen seven COVID-19 deaths and at least 24 staff members infected.

The Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit has said the outbreak at Pinecrest Nursing Home in Bobcaygeon is believed to be the largest in the province.

The health unit says 10 other staff members are awaiting test results, and another person in the community has died in a case linked to the nursing home.

Ontario reported 351 new COVID-19 cases Monday, the largest single-day increase by far, which health officials attribute at least in part to clearing a backlog of pending test results.

Ontario’s chief medical officer of health is recommending that everyone in the province _ especially people over 70 and with compromised immune systems _ stay home except for essential reasons.

Premier Doug Ford says medical supply lines will be “seriously challenged” if there is a massive surge of people into hospitals in the next two weeks, and all options — including further shut downs — are on the table.

The new total of cases in the province is 1,706 — including 431 resolved cases and 23 deaths.

The number of resolved cases had been stuck at eight for many days, but health officials had said to expect a large jump once the data caught up to a new definition for resolved.

The increase in the number of resolved cases also means there are actually fewer active COVID-19 cases in Ontario — 1,252 — than the 1,324 that Sunday’s data had indicated.

A new reporting format from the province also shows that more than 61 per cent of all cases are in the Greater Toronto Area.

Information on how people became infected is still pending for nearly half of all cases in Ontario. About 16 per cent are attributed to community spread, 26 per cent to recent travel, and nearly 10 per cent to close contact with another confirmed case.

About 10 per cent of people in the province who have tested positive for COVID-19 have been hospitalized.

The median age of people infected is 50, with cases ranging in age from under one year old to 100 years old.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending