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2019 in Photos: 35 pictures in politics | TheHill – The Hill

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See the photos chosen by The Hill’s photo editor, Greg Nash, of some of the events that shaped and influenced politics in 2019.

A runner passes overfilled trash cans at the Washington Monument during the partial government shutdown on Jan. 2. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezBiden picks up endorsement from California Democrat Cárdenas Ocasio-Cortez: Trump ‘is afraid of strong women, of Latino women’ Sanders rolls out over 300 California endorsements MORE (D-N.Y.) greets Rep. Joseph Neguse’s (D-Colo.) daughter, Natalie, during the first day of the 116th session of Congress on Jan. 3. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump lashes out at Pelosi on Christmas, decries ‘scam impeachment’ Christmas Day passes in North Korea with no sign of ‘gift’ to US Prosecutors: Avenatti was M in debt during Nike extortion MORE presents fast food to reporters and photographers that will be served to the Clemson Tigers in celebration of their national championship at the White House on Jan. 14. (Chris Kleponis/Pool/Getty Images)

Post-it notes of encouragement are seen on the placard outside Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s (D-N.Y.) office on Jan. 17. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

Supporters of onetime Trump adviser Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneTrump says he hasn’t thought about pardoning Roger Stone The Hill’s 12:30 Report — Presented by UANI — House panel debates terms for impeachment vote Ex-Trump campaign official Gates sentenced to 45 days in jail MORE showed up on Jan. 29 at the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse in Washington, D.C., where Stone pleaded not guilty to charges stemming from former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a ‘failure’ Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE‘s probe into Russia’s election interference. (Stefani Reynolds/The Hill)

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam (D) speaks with reporters at a press conference at the governor’s mansion on Feb. 2 in Richmond as he denies allegations that he is pictured in a yearbook photo wearing racist attire. (Alex Edelman/Getty Images)

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump lashes out at Pelosi on Christmas, decries ‘scam impeachment’ Trump’s tweets became more negative during impeachment, finds USA Today Karl Rove argues Clinton’s impeachment was ‘dignified’ MORE (D-Calif.) motions to her caucus as President Trump gives his State of the Union address on Feb. 5. (Stefani Reynolds/The Hill)

 

President Trump’s onetime lawyer Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenWill the Supreme Court protect the rule of law, or Donald Trump? Former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen asks judge to reduce sentence Trump request for Ukrainian ‘favor’ tops notable quote list MORE tears up during closing statements before the House Oversight and Reform Committee on Feb. 27. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

A protester dressed as a swamp creature is seen during the confirmation hearing of Interior secretary nominee David Bernhardt on March 28. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsMcCarthy recommends Collins, Ratcliffe, Jordan to represent Trump in Senate impeachment trial House votes to impeach Trump ‘Irregardless’ trends on Twitter after Collins impeachment speech MORE (R-Ga.) holds up water bottles to counter House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerImpeachment’s historic moment boils down to ‘rooting for laundry’ Impeachment just confirms Trump’s leadership 2019 was a historic year for marijuana law reform — here’s why MORE‘s (D-N.Y.) point comparing former special counsel Robert Mueller’s report to Ken Starr’s report during a markup to issue subpoenas to five former Trump administration officials on April 3. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

Rep. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenGabbard under fire for ‘present’ vote on impeachment Gabbard votes ‘present’ on impeaching Trump Overnight Defense: Mattis downplays Afghanistan papers | ‘We probably weren’t that good at’ nation building | Judiciary panel approves two impeachment articles | Stage set for House vote next week MORE (D-Tenn.) eats chicken prior to a House Judiciary Committee hearing to discuss former special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on May 3. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrMcCabe accuses Trump officials of withholding evidence in lawsuit over firing Trump says he hasn’t thought about pardoning Roger Stone Pornography consumption: The overlooked public health crisis MORE jokes with outgoing Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinRosenstein, Sessions discussed firing Comey in late 2016 or early 2017: FBI notes Justice Dept releases another round of summaries from Mueller probe Judge rules former WH counsel McGahn must testify under subpoena MORE during a farewell ceremony at the Department of Justice on May 9. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

Democratic presidential candidate Joe BidenJoe BidenLawyer for Giuliani associate to step down, citing client’s financial ‘hardship’ Buttigieg surrogate: Impeachment is ‘literally a Washington story’ Presidential candidates should talk about animals MORE throws his jacket to an aide before addressing supporters during his kickoff rally in Philadelphia on May 18. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

Retired NYPD detective Luis Alvarez gets a standing ovation as he testifies before the House Judiciary Committee, advocating for the reauthorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund on June 11. (Aaron Schwartz/The Hill)

Former White House communications director Hope HicksHope Charlotte Hicks2019 in Photos: 35 pictures in politics Justice Dept releases another round of summaries from Mueller probe Former White House official won’t testify, lawyer says MORE is seen during a break in questioning by the House Judiciary Committee on June 19. (Aaron Schwartz/The Hill)

A flyover is seen during the “Salute to America” celebration at the Lincoln Memorial on July 4. (Aaron Schwartz/The Hill)

A child’s drawing from an immigration detention center is seen during a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on July 12 to discuss President Trump’s family separation policy and alleged mistreatment of children in custody. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

Reps. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibTlaib to Republicans: ‘Your boy called Ukraine and bribed them’ McCarthy says impeachment ‘has discredited the United States House of Representatives’ Hillicon Valley: House panel unveils draft of privacy bill | Senate committee approves bill to sanction Russia | Dems ask HUD to review use of facial recognition | Uber settles sexual harassment charges for .4M MORE (D-Mich.), Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyHillicon Valley: House panel unveils draft of privacy bill | Senate committee approves bill to sanction Russia | Dems ask HUD to review use of facial recognition | Uber settles sexual harassment charges for .4M Democratic lawmakers call for HUD review of facial recognition in federal housing Ilhan Omar responds to ‘Conservative Squad’: ‘Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery’ MORE (D-Mass.), Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarOmar calls on US to investigate Turkey over possible war crimes in Syria Sanders surges ahead of Iowa caucuses Ilhan Omar responds to ‘Conservative Squad’: ‘Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery’ MORE (D-Minn.) and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) hold a press conference on July 15 to condemn President Trump’s recent tweets. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

Former special counsel Robert Mueller is sworn in before testifying to the House Judiciary Committee about his report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election on July 24. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

President Trump arrives to make remarks in front of a doctored presidential seal projected at the conservative Turning Point USA’s Teen Student Action Summit in Washington, D.C., on July 25. (Chris Kleponis/Pool/UPI Photo)

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersButtigieg surrogate: Impeachment is ‘literally a Washington story’ Michael Moore: Sanders can beat Trump in 2020 Buttigieg campaign introduces contest for lowest donation MORE (I-Vt.) and his wife, Jane O’Meara Sanders, are surrounded by staff, security and journalists as they walk along the midway at the Iowa State Fair on Aug. 11 in Des Moines. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenWarren in Christmas tweet slams CBP for treatment of detainees Buttigieg surrogate: Impeachment is ‘literally a Washington story’ Buttigieg campaign introduces contest for lowest donation MORE (D-Mass.) speaks to supporters at a house party in Hampton Falls, N.H., on Sept. 2. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

House Democrats talk to House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) on Sept. 11 after a moment of silence for victims of the 2001 attacks. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

Climate activist Greta Thunberg participates in a youth climate protest on the Ellipse of the White House on Friday, Sept. 13. (Aaron Schwartz/The Hill)

Rep. Ted LieuTed W. Lieu2019 in Photos: 35 pictures in politics Democratic senators tweet photos of pile of House-passed bills ‘dead on Mitch McConnell’s desk’ Overnight Defense: Mattis downplays Afghanistan papers | ‘We probably weren’t that good at’ nation building | Judiciary panel approves two impeachment articles | Stage set for House vote next week MORE (D-Calif.) pauses his social media filming as House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyMcConnell flexes reelection muscle with B gift for Kentucky McCarthy recommends Collins, Ratcliffe, Jordan to represent Trump in Senate impeachment trial Sunday shows preview: 2020 race heats up as impeachment moves to Senate MORE (R-Calif.) and Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseA solemn impeachment day on Capitol Hill House votes to impeach Trump Overnight Defense: House poised for historic vote to impeach Trump | Fifth official leaves Pentagon in a week | Otto Warmbier’s parents praise North Korea sanctions bill MORE (R-La.) walk past to make a statement about the impeachment inquiry on Sept. 24. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

President Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky are seen during a photo-op in New York City at the United Nations General Assembly on Sept. 25. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) high-fives entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangButtigieg campaign introduces contest for lowest donation Yang asks ‘Where’s Tulsi?’ after video of Democratic candidates leaves her out Democratic strategist: Impeachment is ‘moral obligation’ MORE during the CNN/New York Times Democratic presidential debate at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio, on Oct. 15. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Rep. Alex MooneyAlexander (Alex) Xavier Mooney2019 in Photos: 35 pictures in politics Ocasio-Cortez calls out GOP lawmakers asking to be arrested, citing privilege Ocasio-Cortez, Mooney spar on Twitter over closed-door impeachment hearings MORE (R-W.Va.) walks into a sensitive compartmented information facility, where Republicans were holding a protest during a closed-door impeachment inquiry hearing, with his phone on Oct. 23. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

Maya Rockeymoore Cummings pauses during a ceremony in Statuary Hall for her late husband, Rep. Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsOvernight Defense: House poised for historic vote to impeach Trump | Fifth official leaves Pentagon in a week | Otto Warmbier’s parents praise North Korea sanctions bill Pelosi opens impeachment debate: ‘Today we are here to defend the Democracy for the people’ Pelosi announces Porter, Haaland will sit on Oversight panel MORE (D-Md.), before he lies in state outside the House Chamber on Oct. 24. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

President Trump reacts to Washington Nationals catcher Kurt Suzuki wearing a “Make America Great Again” hat as he welcomes the 2019 World Series champions to the White House on Nov. 4. (Kevin Dietsch/UPI Photo)

U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon SondlandGordon SondlandSchumer demands sensitive documents for impeachment trial Republicans eschew any credible case against impeachment Conservative group hits White House with billboard ads: ‘What is Trump hiding?’ MORE arrives to give testimony before the House Intelligence Committee during an impeachment inquiry hearing on Nov. 20. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

President Trump holds his notes while speaking to the media before departing from the White House on Nov. 20.
(Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) lashes out at a reporter after he questioned whether she hated President Trump at the conclusion of her weekly press conference on Dec. 5. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

A Republican aide for the House Judiciary Committee puts a sign up before a markup of H.R. 755, articles of impeachment against President Trump, on Dec. 12. (Greg Nash/The Hill)

The House votes on the second article of impeachment against President Trump on Dec. 18. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post/Pool)

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Parliament resumes amid heightened political pressure on pandemic, vaccines – The Globe and Mail

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau responds to a question during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Dec. 9, 2020.

Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press

The Liberal government is expected to be pressed by opposition parties when Parliament resumes Monday on the availability of vaccines for COVID-19, the recession caused by the virus and when Ottawa intends to put forward a detailed account of federal spending in a budget.

The pandemic, which has dominated Justin Trudeau’s second mandate, has kept the government in crisis-response mode since last March. As of Sunday, the Public Health Agency said there have been 742,531 cases of COVID-19 to date in Canada and 18,974 deaths. There were 146 fatalities reported on Sunday.

With Parliament coming back after the holiday break, Mr. Trudeau’s government is expected to face questions about its handling of the crisis and the pace at which the country is receiving vaccines.

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Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole has said the government is letting down Canadians on the vaccine file and that the country cannot secure its economic future without access to the shots.

NDP House leader and finance critic Peter Julian said Sunday the government must ensure that vaccines make their way into peoples’ arms. He said this issue is “particularly disturbing” during a very dangerous and deadly second wave of the pandemic.

Major-General Dany Fortin, who is leading Canada’s vaccine logistics, said Thursday the delivery of vaccines from Pfizer for the week of Feb. 1 will be cut to 79,000 doses, amounting to a 79-per-cent drop. On Tuesday, he said Canada will get none of the 208,650 doses originally expected this week.

Maj.-Gen. Fortin also said the company has not disclosed what Canada’s shipment will be the week of Feb. 8.

Mr. Julian said there is a “profound concern with the government seeming to rely on statements rather than actually mobilizing the resources they have to make sure that vaccines are actually administered to Canadians.

“What is vitally important and the only thing that Canadians will be satisfied with is that there’s a major step up in administering of vaccines across the country, particularly the Canadians who are the most vulnerable,” he said.

Procurement Minister Anita Anand has said Canada remains on track to receive vaccines for all Canadians who wish to be vaccinated by the end of September.

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Mr. Trudeau’s government is also facing political pressure to re-establish a viceregal appointments committee following the resignation of Governor-General Julie Payette on Thursday.

Ms. Payette’s departure, along with that of her second-in-command Assunta Di Lorenzo, followed the completion of an external review that was requested after media reports detailed allegations of bullying and harassment at Rideau Hall.

Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc told the CBC on Sunday that he doesn’t think the government can pretend the vetting process for Ms. Payette was adequate. The process must be more robust for every senior government appointment, he said.

The Prime Minister hasn’t made any decisions on the specific process to be followed in the coming weeks to replace Ms. Payette, Mr. LeBlanc said, but added that the Privy Council Office will be offering advice to Mr. Trudeau this week.

“It’s not a circumstance we want to drag on for weeks and weeks and weeks,” Mr. LeBlanc said.

Peter Donolo, the vice-chairman of Hill+Knowlton Strategies Canada and a prime ministerial director of communications to Jean Chrétien, said it is not an optimal situation to have the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Richard Wagner, serving in the viceregal role in the interim.

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“That’s why they need to move sooner than later to replace the Governor-General,” he said. “Hopefully it will just be a matter of a couple of weeks at most.”

With a report from Marieke Walsh

Know what is happening in the halls of power with the day’s top political headlines and commentary as selected by Globe editors (subscribers only). Sign up today.

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Parliament resumes amid heightened political pressure on pandemic, vaccines

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau responds to a question during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Dec. 9, 2020.

Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press

The Liberal government is expected to be pressed by opposition parties when Parliament resumes Monday on the availability of vaccines for COVID-19, the recession caused by the virus and when Ottawa intends to put forward a detailed account of federal spending in a budget.

The pandemic, which has dominated Justin Trudeau’s second mandate, has kept the government in crisis-response mode since last March. As of Sunday, the Public Health Agency said there have been 742,531 cases of COVID-19 to date in Canada and 18,974 deaths. There were 146 fatalities reported on Sunday.

With Parliament coming back after the holiday break, Mr. Trudeau’s government is expected to face questions about its handling of the crisis and the pace at which the country is receiving vaccines.

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole has said the government is letting down Canadians on the vaccine file and that the country cannot secure its economic future without access to the shots.

NDP House leader and finance critic Peter Julian said Sunday the government must ensure that vaccines make their way into peoples’ arms. He said this issue is “particularly disturbing” during a very dangerous and deadly second wave of the pandemic.

Major-General Dany Fortin, who is leading Canada’s vaccine logistics, said Thursday the delivery of vaccines from Pfizer for the week of Feb. 1 will be cut to 79,000 doses, amounting to a 79-per-cent drop. On Tuesday, he said Canada will get none of the 208,650 doses originally expected this week.

Maj.-Gen. Fortin also said the company has not disclosed what Canada’s shipment will be the week of Feb. 8.

Mr. Julian said there is a “profound concern with the government seeming to rely on statements rather than actually mobilizing the resources they have to make sure that vaccines are actually administered to Canadians.

“What is vitally important and the only thing that Canadians will be satisfied with is that there’s a major step up in administering of vaccines across the country, particularly the Canadians who are the most vulnerable,” he said.

Procurement Minister Anita Anand has said Canada remains on track to receive vaccines for all Canadians who wish to be vaccinated by the end of September.

Mr. Trudeau’s government is also facing political pressure to re-establish a viceregal appointments committee following the resignation of Governor-General Julie Payette on Thursday.

Ms. Payette’s departure, along with that of her second-in-command Assunta Di Lorenzo, followed the completion of an external review that was requested after media reports detailed allegations of bullying and harassment at Rideau Hall.

Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc told the CBC on Sunday that he doesn’t think the government can pretend the vetting process for Ms. Payette was adequate. The process must be more robust for every senior government appointment, he said.

The Prime Minister hasn’t made any decisions on the specific process to be followed in the coming weeks to replace Ms. Payette, Mr. LeBlanc said, but added that the Privy Council Office will be offering advice to Mr. Trudeau this week.

“It’s not a circumstance we want to drag on for weeks and weeks and weeks,” Mr. LeBlanc said.

Peter Donolo, the vice-chairman of Hill+Knowlton Strategies Canada and a prime ministerial director of communications to Jean Chrétien, said it is not an optimal situation to have the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Richard Wagner, serving in the viceregal role in the interim.

“That’s why they need to move sooner than later to replace the Governor-General,” he said. “Hopefully it will just be a matter of a couple of weeks at most.”

With a report from Marieke Walsh

Know what is happening in the halls of power with the day’s top political headlines and commentary as selected by Globe editors (subscribers only). Sign up today.

Source: – The Globe and Mail

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Donald Trump may not be done disrupting American politics, only this time it could actually end up being an improvement

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President Joe Biden set the tone for his new administration last week seeking to reunite a divided country.
“This is our historic moment of crisis and challenge,” he said, “and unity is the path forward and we must meet this moment as the United States of America.”
It was a noble, aspirational inauguration speech and a message this divided country needed to hear. But it won’t be easy, not in a political environment where for years Americans have been pushed into clans and fed resentment and mistrust.
Sen. Ben Sasse from Nebraska wrote a piece in The Atlantic last week about the reckoning the Republican Party is facing and the soul-searching and house-cleaning that needs to take place to set it in the right direction.
This assumes the Republican Party can be salvaged. It may be too late for that, and there’s another guy who shares that view: Recently unemployed Florida man Donald Trump.
The Wall Street Journal reported last week that Trump had discussed creating a new political party — the Patriot Party — as a refuge for his true believers.

 

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Robert Gehrke.

Wouldn’t you know it, as soon as he’s out of office he comes up with an idea that makes sense. I say that not because it might blow up the Republican Party. I say it because the two-party system is the worst feature of modern American politics.
Our government is so hopelessly dysfunctional that facing a crisis of historic proportions, it took months to pass a COVID relief bill — and that’s just one example. But the larger problem is that the current party structure isn’t about governing at all. It’s about power and holding onto that power by creating a big enough tent.
It has reached a point, however, that in this push to be everything to everybody, the parties have lost any philosophical cohesion.
In what world can you have a Republican Party going forward that includes both Mitt Romney and the people who rampaged through the Capitol looking to take members of Congress hostage? And how does the average Republican feel represented by that party?
The Democrats have an identity crisis of their own, trying to hold together people like Ben McAdams and Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez.
Trying to find a way for everyone to fit means nobody fits well, like Cinderella’s stepsisters trying to cram their feet into ill-fitting slippers. It makes sense that nearly a third of Utah voters choose to not affiliate with either party. That number will continue to grow.
That’s because, as humans, we all have different experiences that inform different world views and beliefs. Things aren’t black-and-white, purely Democratic or Republican.
Maybe you are pro-life but believe in a liberal immigration policy and are a dyed-in-the-wool union member. Or you are devoutly religious, love your guns and think the threat of climate change is dire and everyone deserves a guaranteed income. Or you’re a Black entrepreneur who opposes government regulation but believes Black Lives Matter and police should stop shooting people.
None of that matters in our current system. Donkey or elephant, blue or red — those are your choices. Don’t like it? Feel free to throw away your vote.
If your grocery store gave you two choices of toilet paper — both of them bad, like mesh vs. extra coarse — you’d probably find another store, but this is the only store we have.
Hillary Stirling, the newly minted chairwoman of the United Utah Party would like to give people more choices. Both nationally and in Utah, she said, the two major party agendas are driven by the fringes.
“The people on the extremes are the people who are most active, most interested in politics, so they’re the ones who show up and are most vocal,” she said. That leaves those in the middle dissatisfied with their voices, but the United Utah Party has struggled, like all third-parties, to make much headway.
The inevitable result of these two combatant parties trying to remain in power is we end up with pure bloodsport. The incentives are on obstruction and demonization, not collaboration and compromise. It partly explains why we’ve seen the fierce polarization — fueled by media and online outlets that drive the wedge deeper, which in turn are exploited by opportunistic, ambitious politicians.
We’ve seen other parties rise and fade and we have a handful of third parties in place now, but they aren’t viable because the two parties that make the rules have created a system that perpetuates their power. And because they’re the only viable options, they get all the money.
Without money, minor parties can’t put their candidates in front of people, they can’t get on the ballot, they can’t get into the debates, they can’t win — and when they can’t win donors won’t give money.
“Especially the way our current system is set up, it’s either/or. The question that is currently asked is: Who do you want out of these two people?” Stirling said. “There are better ways to do it, so let’s try those better ways.”
Those better ways, though, will take serious structural changes like public campaign financing, ranked-choice voting or electing members of Congress proportionately, rather than from districts gerrymandered to benefit one party or the other.
The other possibility is the rise of a viable third, and maybe fourth, parties, something Theodore Roosevelt’s popularity couldn’t do and that Ross Perot’s money couldn’t do. It’s possible Trump could use both money and a cult-like following to disrupt the two-party system.
Or, perhaps, Biden is right and, despite a track record to the contrary, Democrats and Republicans can come together and chart a new course and we don’t need major reforms to our system. I hope he is right.
Given our recent history, however, it seems more likely that we’ll see more of the same, with the two parties, left to their own self-serving devices, continuing to pull Americans further and further apart until there is a rift that can’t be healed.

Source: – Salt Lake Tribune

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