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5 things to know for December 19: Impeachment, politics, Korea, Philippines, obesity – CNN

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1. Impeachment 

The House officially impeached President Trump. Votes for the two articles of impeachment were mostly split along party lines, with two Democrats voting against both and one splitting on the two. No Republicans voted in favor of the articles. While all this was going down, President Trump was at a “Merry Christmas” rally in Michigan, where he blasted Democrats for the impeachment push. The articles are supposed to go now to the Senate, but curiously, Speaker Nancy Pelosi has stalled on the move. Some Democrats want to make sure Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell agrees to the Senate trial procedures Dems have requested. As the full picture of last night’s historic decision comes into focus, you can follow today’s live updates and check out these other impeachment resources:
• How are Republicans reacting? One lawmaker said Trump was given fewer rights than Jesus before his crucifixion
• Moderate Democrats who voted for impeachment may face a tough political future. Here’s what some said about the decision that could cost them their seats. 
• Still confused about how we got here? This explainer video will clear it all up before the process moves to the Senate. 
• How much do you actually know about the process? For instance, who officially presides over the Senate trial? Take our impeachment quiz. 

2. Politics

It was a busy day in politics even without the whole “rare and historic day of impeachment.” While the House debated and voted, Sen. McConnell forced a deal with Democrats to expedite 11 federal district judge nominations. McConnell has had a lot of success changing the country’s judicial landscape, installing about 50 appellate court judges and clocking a big win for Trump and his agenda. Speaking of judges, a federal appeals court ruled that the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate is unconstitutional. The ruling doesn’t invalidate the entire law, a longtime political target for Trump. But it does trot health care back into the political spotlight. Now, any Supreme Court action on health care will probably be pushed until after the 2020 election.

3. Korea 

The US and South Korea are at stalemate on a cost-sharing agreement for US troops stationed in the country. President Trump reportedly asked Seoul to pay roughly 400% more to house US troops. The current agreement expires at the end of the year, and another round of talks is scheduled for January. There’s worry in Washington that if the two sides don’t reach a compromise, Trump could unilaterally start pulling forces from the region. The agreement is just one of the many delicate diplomatic situations tying the US to the Korean Peninsula. North Korea is openly flirting with more long-range missile tests and nuclear activities, putting a serious strain on the Trump administration’s unusual relationship with the hermit country.

4. Philippines

The people accused of planning a massacre that stunned the Philippines’ political establishment have been found guilty, 10 years later. A judge found Datu Andal Ampatuan Jr. guilty in the killing of 58 people, including 30 journalists and relatives of a rival gubernatorial candidate, Ismael “Toto” Mangudadatu. Several of Ampatuan’s relatives were also convicted in what’s been called the “trial of the decade.” Even now, the case has larger implications for the country’s political scene. The Ampatuans were backed by members of the Philippines police and army, and the government declared martial law after the massacre. Today’s verdict emboldens human rights activists to call for an end to localized corruption and militia activity that can be leveraged by powerful families or groups.

5. Obesity

It looks like we better get moving: According to a new study, half of Americans will be obese in the next 10 years if we don’t work together to solve the problem. The study casts obesity as a social, rather than individual, issue. Health care experts chimed in, saying the predicted rise in obesity would create untold strain on health care spending through the rise of obesity-related health consequences. But there is hope: Experts say there are some big-picture changes we can make, collectively and individually, to improve the outlook. For instance, communities could improve local public transportation systems, encourage walking instead of driving and keep schools open on weekends and during summers to allow access to gyms and swimming pools. Improving access to fresh produce also could have social and health-related benefits.

BREAKFAST BROWSE

The reviews are in, and the new ‘Cats’ movie is … weird
Visiting museums and art galleries will help you live longer
As the new ‘Star Wars’ premieres, look back at Princess Leia’s iconic side buns
Instagram influencers can no longer promote vaping or guns
It’s another step in making Instagram a safer place to brag about how attractive you are.
Santa’s finger bone is among the medieval treasures given to an English monastery
“Santa’s Finger Bone” (sung to the tune of “Here Comes Santa Claus”) would make a pretty catchy Christmas carol.

TODAY’S QUOTE

“He’s going to find that very difficult unless he’s prepared to make a lot of concessions to Europe.”
Former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair, on what he thinks PM Boris Johnson will have to sacrifice if he wants to negotiate a Brexit conclusion in 2020

TODAY’S NUMBER

$100 billion
That’s how much the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is accused of stockpiling in accounts intended for charitable works, according to a whistleblower complaint. If true, the accounts would have helped the church avoid taxes and mislead its members. 

HAPPENING LATER

Dems debate again
The top Democratic candidates will meet in Los Angeles tonight for the sixth and final debate of the year. It begins at 8 p.m. ET. Watch live on CNN.

TODAY’S WEATHER

AND FINALLY

How lovely are your branches 
You deserve a break. Enjoy some very good boys and girls from the Royal Dutch Guide Dog Foundation lining up to form the world’s cutest Christmas tree. (Click here to view.) 

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How Faith Shapes My Politics – The New York Times

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Over the past few decades, whenever a Republican president puts up an important judicial nominee — especially a Catholic one — we go through the same routine. Some Democrat accuses the nominee of imposing her religious views on the law.

“The dogma lives loudly within you,” Senator Dianne Feinstein notoriously told Amy Coney Barrett in a 2017 confirmation hearing. Then Republicans accuse Democrats of being religious bigots. Then the nominee testifies that her personal opinions or religious faith will have absolutely no bearing on her legal judgments.

This unconvincing routine gets us no closer to understanding two important questions: How does faith influence a person’s political views? How should we look at religiously devout people in public life?

To the extent that I have answers to these questions it’s through my own unusual experience. I came to faith in middle age after I’d been in public life for a while. I would say that coming to faith changed everything and yet didn’t alter my political opinions all that much. That’s because assenting to a religion is not like choosing to be a Republican or a Democrat. It happens on a different level of consciousness.

When I was a kid, I was raised, like most people in our culture, on certain stories: Moses leading the Israelites out of oppression, little David slaying Goliath, Ruth swearing loyalty to Naomi.

During my decades as an atheist, I thought the stories were false but the values they implied were true. These values — welcome the stranger, humility against pride — became the moral framework I applied to think through my opinions, to support various causes. Like a lot of atheists, I found the theology of Reinhold Niebuhr very helpful.

About seven years ago I realized that my secular understanding was not adequate to the amplitude of life as I experienced it. There were extremes of joy and pain, spiritual fullness and spiritual emptiness that were outside the normal material explanations of things.

I was gripped by the conviction that the people I encountered were not skin bags of DNA, but had souls; had essences with no size or shape, but that gave them infinite value and dignity. The conviction that people have souls led to the possibility that there was some spirit who breathed souls into them.

What finally did the trick was glimpses of infinite goodness. Secular religions are really good at identifying some evils, like oppression, and building a moral system against them. Divine religions are primarily oriented to an image of pure goodness, pure loving kindness, holiness. In periodic glimpses of radical goodness — in other people, in sensations of the transcendent — I felt, as Wendell Berry put it, “knowledge crawl over my skin.” The biblical stories from Genesis all the way through Luke and John became living presences in my life.

These realizations transformed my spiritual life: awareness of God’s love, participation in grace, awareness that each person is made in God’s image. Faith offered an image of a way of being, an ultimate allegiance.

But when it came to forming opinions or writing columns, I was still in the same business. Sure, my style of thinking changed a bit. I spent more time listening, trying to discern how I was being called. I began to think with my heart as much as my head. (That could just be male middle age.) But my basic moral values — derived from the biblical metaphysic — were already in place and didn’t change that much now that the biblical stories had come alive.

My point is there is no neat relationship between the spiritual consciousness and the moral and prudential consciousnesses. When it comes to thinking and acting in the public square, we believers and nonbelievers are all in the same boat — trying to apply our moral frameworks to present realities. Faith itself doesn’t make you wiser or better.

When it comes to judges, I don’t believe any operate without a moral framework, like perfect legal automatons. I don’t believe faith alone points any of them to concrete answers. Look at how judges from the same faith come out all over the map on all issues. Look at how, deep down, the anti-abortion Catholics you know are driven by intellectual and moral conviction, not by mindless submission to Rome.

And to be honest about it, our worldly connections are usually more influential than our faith commitments when it comes to our political and professional decisions. If you want to know how Amy Coney Barrett is going to rule, pay more attention to the Federalist Society than to People of Praise, her Christian community.

In a society that is growing radically more secular every day, I’d say we have more to fear from political dogmatism than religious dogmatism. We have more to fear from those who let their politics determine their faith practices and who turn their religious communities into political armies. We have more to fear from people who look to politics as a substitute for faith.

And we have most to fear from the possibility that the biblical metaphysic, which has been a coherent value system for believers and nonbelievers for centuries, will fade from our culture, the stories will go untold, and young people will grow up in a society without any coherent moral ecology at all.

The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips. And here’s our email: letters@nytimes.com.

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End 'Wild West' for political ads, campaigners say – BBC News

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A surge in online political advertising spending during last year’s general election shows the need for greater transparency, campaigners say.

The Electoral Reform Society (ERS) estimated the three main UK-wide parties spent more than twice as much on online adverts as on 2017’s poll.

A lack of regulation was creating a “Wild West” in need of stronger oversight, it added.

The government called its efforts to reform advertising “world-leading”.

Last month, minsters published plans for a “digital imprint” on social media ads, promising “the same transparency” for voters as for election leaflets and posters.

The ERS welcomed these, but said they were “unlikely to be sufficient”.

In a report, the campaign group said providing more information to voters about political adverts online represented an “urgent challenge for democracy”.

It argued claims over their accuracy were becoming “increasingly prominent” online, where it was easier for pop-up campaigners, as well as established political parties, to influence debate.

The ERS added there had been “several high-profile examples of dishonest or misleading claims” across the political spectrum during the 2019 campaign.

It pointed out existing accuracy rules on commercial adverts did not extend to political campaigning, while donations laws provided only a “minimal” snapshot of how much parties spent online.

What did the report find?

  • The study, compiled by academics Katharine Dommett and Sam Power, estimated party spending using the transparency archives of social media firms
  • It found the Conservatives, Labour and Lib Dems combined spent around £6m campaigning on Facebook and just under £3m on Google
  • The analysis suggested the Conservatives spent comparatively more on Google, backing claims it sought to reach voters through YouTube
  • The researchers said 64 non-party groups had registered as official political campaigners for the election, with 46 registering after the poll was announced
  • They calculated a total of 88 non-party campaign groups placed 13,197 adverts on Facebook, at a combined cost of £2.7m

The report made recommendations requiring political campaigners to provide more detailed spending invoices more quickly after elections to the Electoral Commission, the UK’s elections watchdog.

It also urged parties to work with regulators and the advertising industry to develop a code of practice for political adverts.

The Electoral Commission says it does not have the power or resources to monitor the truthfulness of political advertising.

But it has previously echoed calls for greater transparency, adding in its review of the 2019 election that rules needed to be updated.

Constitution Minister Chloe Smith said: “People want to engage with politics online. That’s where campaigners connect with voters, so naturally political parties across the board are increasing their digital campaigning activity.

“This government is already making political campaigning more transparent for voters, with new, world-leading measures that will require campaign content promoted online to explicitly show who is behind it.”

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Democrats also play politics with Supreme Court seats – CNN

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Charlie Dent
Like her dear friend Justice Antonin Scalia, Ginsburg died in the final year of a president’s term, and this vacancy will ignite yet another epic Supreme Court battle . During the prolonged debate and discussion over the nomination of Merrick Garland in 2016, I believed that then-President Barack Obama had the right to make the nomination in a presidential election year and that the Senate should have initiated the confirmation process.
Similarly, under the Constitution, President Donald Trump is well within his rights to make a nomination, and the Senate GOP is within theirs to move forward with the confirmation process now. However, Republicans are justifiably being criticized for hypocrisy. In many instances you can simply use the words of Republican Senators from four years ago against them now. Yes, this is a power play and it is all very cynical.
Nevertheless, if the shoe were on the other foot, with Democrats controlling both the Presidency and Senate under the same circumstances, they most assuredly would attempt fill a Supreme Court vacancy without hesitation and in record time. No one should be surprised the GOP will do everything within their power to fill this vacancy before the end of the year.
Democrats are predictably making hyperbolic and exaggerated statements about the impact of this Supreme Court fight, from overturning Roe v. Wade to stripping Americans of certain civil rights. We’ve heard all of this with past GOP Supreme Court nominations; it’s part of the Democratic playbook.
Obviously much of this rhetoric is aimed to motivate the Democratic base in the hopes of making electoral change. In this battle, the Democrats most persuasive attack will be on health care and the plight of people with pre-existing conditions should the Affordable Care Act be struck down, which was nearly overturned by the Supreme Court a few years ago with Justice Ginsburg as part of a majority in opposition.
To be clear, the tactic of weaponizing the politics of the Supreme Court is not new nor is it reserved to only one party. Republicans have for decades employed a fairly comprehensive strategy for building and maintaining the current conservative balance of the Court. One needs no further evidence then their reliance on outside groups like The Federalist Society to vet ideologically appropriate potential nominees.
Meanwhile, the Democrats have employed the politics of the personal destruction to tear down Republican nominees — starting with the rejection of Judge Robert Bork in 1987, to hardball tactics used against Clarence Thomas and Brett Kavanaugh, respectively. The left attacked Bork mercilessly and declared him too extreme to be confirmed; they even turned Bork’s name into a verb. His nomination was defeated in the Democrat controlled Senate 58-42. President Reagan then nominated Anthony Kennedy who was confirmed unanimously.
It should be noted many Democrats and their allies said at the time that Kennedy would overturn Roe v. Wade. The same was said about virtually every other Republican Presidential Supreme Court nominee including swing votes Sandra Day O’Connor and John Roberts, as well as the liberal David Souter.
No, Republicans most assuredly do not have a monopoly on hypocrisy and cynicism. Nor have Democrats shied away from a bare knuckle, back alley fight when it comes to past Supreme Court nominations.
Although within their right to move forward, Senate Republicans would be wise to let the voice of the American people be heard in this confirmation process. Hastily moving forward under an artificial political deadline, in this case the election, may severely damage the credibility of the nomination process.
Politically, President Trump may benefit from this Supreme Court fight. Rather than discussing Trump’s botched Covid-19 response, absurd comments or his glaring unfitness to hold office, the narrative is about something both the GOP base and soft Trump voters care deeply and passionately — in 2016 exit polls, 56% of Trump voters said appointments were “the most important factor” in their vote.
Notwithstanding his inconsistent and contradictory statements on considering Supreme Court nominees in a presidential election year,
Sen. Lindsey Graham, chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee and who is locked in a tight reelection fight, likely benefits from this fight, too, in deep red South Carolina. Of course, Democrats will be further angered and energized by this fight as well to the detriment of swing state Republicans like Sens. Susan Collins, Cory Gardner and perhaps a few others in competitive elections.
Meanwhile, Democrats would be wise not to overreact with hyperbole and personal accusations, or extreme proposals like court packing, DC statehood, and impeachment. Instead, they should focus on putting pressure on Republican Senators and working to defeat President Trump at the ballot box.
Unless Democrats can find four GOP Senators to oppose Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, they will lose this battle. If they’re smart, they will use this potential defeat to mobilize their base and turn out their voters for the upcoming and future elections. In fact, Democratic prospects of winning the White House remain very favorable, and flipping several seats in the Senate is well within their reach.
Republicans appear poised to pick up another Supreme Court seat, but the fight is just beginning. If the vote on the nominee occurs before the election, what will the impact be on the presidential race, and swing state Republican senators? If a confirmation vote were to occur in the lame duck session, and Democrats were to turn the tables in the election by winning the Presidency and the Senate, will defeated Republican Senators vote to confirm the nominee under those circumstances? We’ll know soon enough.

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