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A view from space: these new ISS photos of Earth are out of this world! – Digital Camera World

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Over the past 20 years, some of the best pictures of Earth have been taken from the International Space Station, as it loops around the world at a height of around 250 miles. But with a new crew of Expedition 64 now having been on board for over a month, there is a new name to add to the list of astronaut photographers who have been showing us distinctive aerial shots of Earth. ISS Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi is a space veteran – having first done a stint on the space station back in 2009. But now it appears one of his main duties is to take pictures of the world beneath him.

He has already shared a large number of beautiful images on his Twitter feed, and on the official NASA image log. And we have been particularly taken with some of this shots of the world’s major cities, including New York, San Francisco and Sydney (as you can see below).

But what is Soichi Noguchi’s weapon of choice for taking pictures from Cupola observatory module on the ISS? Turns out that NASA have not yet turned mirrorless, and are sticking with the Nikon D5 DSLRs that it bought a batch of back in 2017. And an astronaut’s lens of choice for photographing the world beneath his feet? Well that turns out to be a Nikkor 400mm f/2.8 – a lens more usually seen around the touchlines of the world’s sports stadia.

New York City, with Central Park clearly visible in the center – as seen from the International Space Station (Image credit: NASA)

Tulsa, Oklahoma, with the winding Arkansas River (Image credit: NASA)

ISS

Elkhart, Indiana, split by the St. Joseph River (Image credit: NASA)

Deriba caldera in Darfur, Sudan, which holds two lakes (Image credit: NASA)

City of Jubba, Saudi Arabia, surrounded by the Nefud Desert (Image credit: NASA)

Christchurch, New Zealand near Lake Ellesmere and Pigeon Bay (Image credit: NASA)

ISS

Houston, Texas (Image credit: NASA)

Sydney, Australia (Image credit: NASA)

San Francisco Bay (Image credit: NASA)

Dubai, UAE – with Palm Islands and The World Islands clearly visible (Image credit: NASA)

Read more
How to photograph the International Space Station (ISS)
The best camera for astrophotography
The best telescope in 2020
The best binoculars in 2020
A day in the life of astrophotographer Alyn Wallace

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Spacewalking astronauts improve station's European lab | TheSpec.com – TheSpec.com

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Spacewalking astronauts installed a high-speed data link outside the International Space Station’s European lab on Wednesday and tackled other improvements.

NASA’s Mike Hopkins and Victor Glover floated out early and headed straight to Columbus, one of the three high-tech labs at the orbiting outpost.

“That’s a beautiful view,” Hopkins observed as the station soared 260 miles (420 kilometres) above Kazakhstan.

The astronauts hauled with them a fancy new antenna for Columbus that will provide faster communication with European researchers via satellites and ground stations. Although they had trouble driving in some of the bolts to attach the boxy antenna, the size of a small refrigerator, it appeared to be secure and Mission Control declared success.

Danish astronaut Andreas Morgensen guided the spacewalkers from Mission Control in Houston, where controllers wore masks and were seated apart because of the pandemic.

The spacewalkers also needed to hook up power and data cables for an experiment platform for science research outside the European lab that’s been awaiting activation for almost a year.

SpaceX delivered the platform named Bartolomeo to the space station last spring. The shelf was installed with the station’s robot arm, but had to wait until Wednesday’s spacewalk to get hooked up and activated.

Airbus, which built and runs Bartolomeo, is selling space on the platform for private research projects. It’s Europe’s first commercial venture outside the station.

Hopkins and Glover will perform a second spacewalk on Monday to complete battery upgrades to the station’s solar power grid. The latest spacewalk was the third for Hopkins and first for Glover.

They are part of SpaceX’s second astronaut flight that launched in November. Their docked Dragon capsule was visible on NASA TV during the spacewalk.

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The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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nasa mars helicopter – Intelligent Aerospace

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WASHINGTON – NASA’s Perseverance explorer will land on the red planet on Feb. 18, but the rover won’t be the only newly arrived robotic explorer. The wheeled robot carries the Mars Helicopter Ingenuity on its belly, and NASA has posted a handy list of things to know about this mission. Although, several of the six facts seem to drive home that NASA doesn’t really know if Ingenuity is going to work. In fact, it could still be seen as a success at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory even if it crashes on its first flight, Ryan Whitwam reports for Extreme TechContinue reading original article.

The Intelligent Aerospace take:

January 27, 2021 –The Mars helicopter weighs in at four pounds on Earth (and 1.5 pounds on Mars) and has rotors that come in at four feet tip-to-tip. It is powered by a solar panel that charges Lithium-ion batteries, which allows for one 90-second flight per Martian day. In that time, it can fly up to 980 feet at an altitude up to 15 feet. It will fly autonomously.

Related: Six things to know about NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter

Related: Smiths Interconnect’s contact technology launched on NASA Mars Perseverance Rover

Related: Northrop Grumman contributes navigation system for NASA’s mars rover mission

Jamie Whitney, Associate Editor
Intelligent Aerospace

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Spacewalking astronauts venture out to improve European lab – Toronto Star

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A pair of astronauts went spacewalking Wednesday to install a high-speed data link outside the International Space Station’s European lab.

NASA’s Mike Hopkins and Victor Glover floated out early and headed straight to Columbus, one of the three high-tech labs at the orbiting outpost.

“That’s a beautiful view,” Hopkins observed as the station soared 260 miles (420 kilometres) above Kazakhstan.

They hauled with them a fancy new antenna for Columbus that will provide faster communication with European researchers via satellites and ground stations. The boxy antenna is the size of a small refrigerator.

Danish astronaut Andreas Morgensen guided the spacewalkers from Mission Control in Houston, where controllers wore masks and were seated apart because of the pandemic.

The spacewalkers also needed to hook up power and data cables for an experiment platform for science research outside the European lab that’s been awaiting activation for almost a year.

SpaceX delivered the platform named Bartolomeo to the space station last spring. The shelf was installed with the station’s robot arm, but had to wait until Wednesday’s spacewalk to get hooked up and activated.

Airbus, which built and runs Bartolomeo, is selling space on the platform for private research projects. It’s Europe’s first commercial venture outside the station.

Hopkins and Glover will perform a second spacewalk on Monday to complete battery upgrades to the station’s solar power grid. The latest spacewalk was the third for Hopkins and first for Glover.

They are part of SpaceX’s second astronaut flight that launched in November. Their docked Dragon capsule was visible on NASA TV during the spacewalk.

___

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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