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Apple releases iOS 15.2.1 to patch iPhones and iPads against HomeKit flaw – Yahoo Movies Canada

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Apple has fixed a security vulnerability in iOS and iPadOS that could be exploited via HomeKit to launch persistent denial of service (DoS) attacks.

The technology giant released iOS 15.2.1 and iPadOS 15.2.1 on Wednesday to patch the so-called “doorLock” flaw, which was disclosed earlier this month by security researcher Trevor Spiniolas. The bug affects iPhones and iPads running iOS 14.7 through iOS 15.2 and is triggered via HomeKit, Apple’s smart home platform that lets Apple users configure, communicate with and control their smart home devices.

To exploit the bug, an attacker would need to change the name of a HomeKit device to a string larger than 500,000 characters. When that string loads on a user’s iPhone or iPad, the device’s software would be thrown into a denial of service (DoS) state, requiring a forced-reset to unfreeze. But once the device reboots and the user signs back into the iCloud account linked to HomeKit, the bug is triggered again.

Even if a user doesn’t have any devices added on HomeKit, an attacker could create a spoof Home network and trick a user into joining via a phishing email. Worse, Spiniolas warned that attackers could leverage the doorLock vulnerability to launch ransomware attacks against iOS users, locking devices into an unusable state and demanding a ransom payment to set the HomeKit device back to a safe string length.

Spiniolas said that Apple pledged to fix the issue in a security update last year, but this was pushed back until “early 2022,” prompting Spiniolas to disclose the bug fearing the delay poses a “serious risk” to users.

“Despite them confirming the security issue and me urging them many times over the past four months to take the matter seriously, little was done,” he wrote. “Status updates on the matter were rare and featured exceptionally few details, even though I asked for them frequently.”

“Apple’s lack of transparency is not only frustrating to security researchers who often work for free, it poses a risk to the millions of people who use Apple products in their day-to-day lives by reducing Apple’s accountability on security matters.”

The update can be downloaded now and is available for the iPhone 6s and later, all iPad Pro models, iPad Air 2 and later, iPad 5th generation and later, iPad mini 4 and later and iPod touch (7th generation).

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Samsung Galaxy A53 passes through TENAA, some specifications revealed – XDA Developers

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The Galaxy S22 series isn’t too far off, with Samsung now accepting reservation orders for the phones, but there are a few other devices in the pipeline too. One of them is the Galaxy A53, the upcoming entry in Samsung’s super-popular A50 lineup, which has already leaked a few times. Now we have the first concrete information about the phone’s hardware, thanks to a new regulatory listing.

TENAA, China’s equivalent to the FCC, has published certification information for the Galaxy A53 (via Android Authority). The page includes dimly-lit photos of the phone from the front, rear, and side, which appear to match the renders published by OnLeaks from November. There is some new information though, especially about the internal hardware.

The phone is identified as the SM-A5360, and has 5G support — there was speculation that Samsung might be ditching the 4G option and only selling a 5G-capabel A53, but we’ll have to wait and see if that’s true for every region. TENAA says the device measures 159.5×74.7×8.1 mm, again matching the information from OnLeaks, and weighs 190 grams.

Other hardware details include a 6.46-inch 1080×2400 display, a 4,860mAh battery, an unspecified 8-core CPU, 8GB of RAM, 128 or 256GB of internal storage, microSD card support up to 1TB, and an under-screen fingerprint sensor. There are three rear cameras: 64MP, 32MP, and two 5MP. The listing also reaffirms the Galaxy A53 won’t have a headphone jack, which is a shame.

Overall, the phone doesn’t appear to be significantly different from last year’s Galaxy A52. The screen is nearly identical in size, though we don’t know the refresh rate — the A52 4G had a 90Hz display, while the A52 5G/A52S was 120Hz. The Galaxy A52 also had the same 8GB RAM, 128/256GB storage, and in-display fingerprint sensor. We don’t know for sure what each camera will do, but the A52 had a 64MP primary lens, a 12MP ultra-wide, a 5MP macro, and a 5MP depth sensor. The 32MP camera mentioned in the listing could be an upgraded ultra-wide, or Samsung might be swapping it for something else (like a telephoto camera).

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You can reserve a Galaxy S22 or Tab S8 now and get $50 store credit – GSMArena.com news – GSMArena.com

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Today, Samsung confirmed that it will announce its Galaxy S22 series in February, but you can reserve a pre-order spot for a Galaxy S22 series phone or a Galaxy Tab S8 now.

You need to follow this link and give your details to reserve a spot in the pre-ordering queue for one of Samsung’s upcoming devices. Samsung is giving those who reserve a unit $50 store credit towards a purchase of other Galaxy products during the pre-order period and you could get your Galaxy S22 or Tab S8 device delivered earlier than other people.

Samsung is also promising other exclusive offers once the Galaxy S22 and Tab S8 devices begin their pre-order phase.

Samsung will unveil three phones – the Galaxy S22, Galaxy S22+, and the Galaxy S22 Ultra, as well as the Galaxy Tab S8 series.

The Galaxy S22 Ultra, in particular, will be an interesting device – it will blend the Galaxy S Ultra series’ camera and large battery with the Galaxy Note series’ built-in S Pen and body aesthetic.

You can reserve a Galaxy S22 or Galaxy Tab S8 right here.

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Vergecast: Microsoft to acquire Activision, Google building a headset, and the 5G battle with airlines – The Verge

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Every Friday, The Verge publishes our flagship podcast, The Vergecast, where we discuss the week in tech news with the reporters and editors covering the biggest stories.

The biggest news in tech this week was Microsoft acquiring game publisher Activision Blizzard for $68.7 billion. On today’s Vergecast, Verge editor-in-chief Nilay Patel talks with games reporter Ash Parrish and senior reporter Alex Heath about the acquisition, the issues behind the culture at Activision Blizzard, and what this means for the gaming space in the future.

The crew also discusses Alex’s scoop this week that Google is building an AR headset, internally codenamed Project Iris, that it hopes to ship in 2024.

Later in the show, Verge policy editor Russell Brandom joins to discuss the ongoing battle between the FAA, AT&T, Verizon, and airlines over activating 5G towers around airports, as well as the tech antitrust bills developing in Congress this week.

You can listen to the show here or in your preferred podcast player for the full discussion.

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