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Exhibition of Buffy Sainte-Marie's digital art in Winnipeg shows different side of iconic musician – CBC.ca

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Most people know Buffy Sainte-Marie thanks to her decades-long and groundbreaking musical career or her work in activism and education.

But a new exhibition at a Winnipeg art gallery displays a lesser-known side of the Canadian icon by highlighting her innovative digital artwork.

Buffy Sainte-Marie: Pathfinder, an exhibition at the Urban Shaman gallery in the city’s Exchange District, presents 16 of her digital paintings, as well as never-before-seen sketches, artifacts and behind-the-scenes photos.

Curator Natasha Lowenthal thinks the exhibition will be enjoyed by Sainte-Marie’s fans, as well as those who are not as familiar with her work.

The collection is an opportunity “for everyone to really understand [Buffy’s] role in the entire arts and cultures scene,” says Lowenthal.

While the artwork in the exhibit cannot be taken out of context from Sainte-Marie’s music, activism, and writing, the paintings highlight “a different voice” from the artist, Lowenthal says.

“There’s an entirely new facet of understanding that you come to when you look at an artist’s visual art,” she said in a phone interview with CBC News.

“Nothing is departmentalized with [Buffy]. Everything is interconnected, and that’s a very conscious thing for her.”

Sainte-Marie began working on the paintings when home computers, like this early Macintosh, were in their infancy. (Robert Snowbird)

Pathfinder provides a unique insight into Sainte-Marie’s creative process and represents the most comprehensive survey of her digital paintings to date, according to an online description of the exhibit.

While digital art is now an established genre, Sainte-Marie began working on the digital paintings before “using a computer for art was even a concept yet,” said Lowenthal.

“She had to create these beautiful paintings one pixel at a time. She was really innovative in how she used all of the extra technology as well, like she was scanning in images, and she was working with a Macintosh [computer] that was literally the first model,” she said.

“In a day when we have presets and filters and a multitude of tools, [Buffy] had the opposite.”

The exhibition, presented in partnership with the Winnipeg gallery Ace Art Inc. and Paquin Entertainment Group, opened at Urban Shaman on Dec. 17 and is scheduled to run until March 5.

However, after its opening, the gallery temporarily closed its doors to the public in response to rising COVID-19 numbers and public health orders. A virtual gallery is in the works and will soon be available on its website, Urban Shaman says.

The exhibition will be travelling across North America at the very least, and hopefully the world in the coming years, Lowenthal said.

“It’s a new window into the life of somebody who’s really an authentic artist, who really looks at the arts in a holistic way, and who is always finding new ways to reach out and connect,” she said.

“It’s really quite a world-class exhibition.”

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Cornwall Hive's Art 4 All event hopes to grow – Standard Freeholder

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It might have been virtual, but the first ever Art 4 All still yielded some good results on Saturday.

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The event, organized by the Cornwall Art Hive, aimed at getting the local artistic community together to discuss the craft, create connections and of course, create. Initially, it was to be hosted at the Cornwall Square mall, but health and safety restrictions meant that it had to take place over Zoom.

Despite a smaller turnout that anticipated, Richard Salem, executive director of Your Arts Council of Cornwall and the SDG Counties (YAC), is hopeful that future Art 4 All events can be held in person.

“We felt that rather than not have anything that this would be better than nothing,” he said. “We are trying to keep the events as consistent as possible. We want to have one every month and hopefully by next month, the third Saturday, at Cornwall Square, we will have an event in person.”

In all, three local artists too part in the event — Salem, Yafa Goawily, and Liv Bigtree.

“Right now I have work showing at the Brooklyn collective which is a gallery space in North Carolina,” said Bigtree, 19. “Right now, I’m not really doing much, art-wise. I’ve been taking it easy, taking a little break.

“I like to do that when I’m not really working on big projects, I just come back to this space where I just have fun.”

  1. The Your Arts Council of Cornwall and SDG unveiled a new logo in collaboration with the Cornwall Art Hive at its general meeting on Tuesday, June 22, 2021 over Zoom. Handout/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder/Postmedia Network

    Your Arts Council struggled in pandemic, but excited for the year ahead

  2. The old Bank of Montreal building on Pitt Street on Friday July 6, 2018 in Cornwall, Ont. The building will soon become Cornwall's new arts centre.
Lois Ann Baker/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder/Postmedia Network

    YAC interested in running Cornwall’s arts centre

Goawily, which produces a wide range of visual arts, said creating art has always been relieving. She also explained that although the pandemic has created some issues for artists, it has had the effect of growing the local art movement.

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“We are growing not just with events and support, we are growing because we can reach different people – that is our main goal,” she said. “The community knows now that we are open for them.”

“Art is so important not just for artists but for everyone,” said Bigtree. “You don’t have to have specific skills. I really think that everyone is an artist. I think that it’s part of what makes us humans.

“Art is about freedom and that is what art hive is trying to create.”

Even with the pandemic, the Cornwall Art Hive and YAC still managed to host well-attended events in the summer, in Lamoureux Park. According to Salem, the happenings attracted residents from all walks of life and grew fast in popularity.

“Of course that it’s sad (pandemic restrictions), but I think that we learned to support each other more,” said Goawily. “I was new to Cornwall and did my first solo exhibition here. I find that yes, we are tiny but we are mighty. We are growing fast and we support each other truly.”

“We started buying art from each other and we had some groups going sharing what we had accomplished. We are stronger together.”

Anyone interested in gaining insight on the local art community can do so through a variety of videos uploaded to the Your Arts Council Youtube channel .

Fracine@postmedia.com

twitter.com/FrancisRacine

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The LA Art Show Returns With an Environmental Focus – Surface Magazine

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Environmental issues have taken on a particular urgency in the past year. Climate scientists have warned that if nations fail to immediately pivot from fossil fuels, catastrophic consequences await. Artists frequently reckon with this grim reality, with many expressing skepticism—if not outright anger—at climate inaction, which has resulted in the destruction of coral reefs, intense wildfires, rising sea levels, and the extinction of beloved animal species. The issues surrounding climate change have become top of mind for The LA Art Show, which is kicking off the city’s eagerly anticipated 2022 art season with a newfound ecological lens thanks to the return of DIVERSEartLA.

This year’s edition, which kicks off today at the Los Angeles Convention Center, sheds light not only on how artists represent the environment in their work, but how humanity’s role factors into the equation. “DIVERSEartLA 2022 will encourage visitors to confront the complex challenges of our global climate crisis and imagine potential solutions,” says Marisa Caichiolo, the show’s curator, who encouraged participating art museums to partner with science and environmental institutions. “This topic is at the heart of a growing number of art narratives, including exhibitions built with high-tech innovations designed to inspire artistic appreciation and the desire to respond to environmental challenges, reinforcing the value of translating environmental advocacy into art.” 

Among the programming highlights is “Our turn to change,” a worry-inducing video installation by Andrea Juan and Gabriel Penedo Diego and presented by the Museum of Nature of Cantabria Spain that awakens viewers to melting polar ice caps that are causing sea levels to rise drop by drop. The Torrance Art Museum, meanwhile, presents “Memorial to the Future,” a collaborative piece curated by Max Presneill that centers Brutalist architecture as a failed model of idealism while highlighting the immediate need for environmental action. And in “The Earth’s Fruits” by Guillermo Anselmo Vezzosi, waste unexpectedly takes on a dignified second life. 

The LA Art Show opens at the Los Angeles Convention Center, South Hall, from Jan. 19–23. 

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300-pound local art heist took 4 minutes | News | pentictonherald.ca – pentictonherald.ca

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300-pound local art heist took 4 minutes | News | pentictonherald.ca  pentictonherald.ca



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