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Art for art's sake – Patrick Weiss, Canmore mail carrier – The Crag and Canyon

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Patrick Weiss delivers the mail to a community mail box on a rain day in Canmore. photo by Pam Doyle/www.pamdoylephoto.com

jpg, BA

Patrick Weiss is a front line worker in Canmore.

Weiss is a Rural and Suburban Mail Carrier with Canada Post and he has been working since the Covid-19 virus was first detected.

“Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night stops the mail from being delivered,” Weiss said.

You could also add ‘virus’ to his statement.

Weiss delivers to the communities of the Peaks of Grassi, Mineside, Homesteads and Prospect Point. People depend on their mail even more than before the virus disrupted normal routines.

“I’ve definitely been much busier during the pandemic,” Weiss said. “My parcel delivery is up almost 40 percent for this time of year increasing the workload to Christmas-like volume. This is probably due to all the online ordering of goods during the lockdown.”

Working through the -30 C cold snaps of the last few winters has been challenging though, he said.

The thought of taking a break from work now because of the coronavirus hasn’t crossed his mind.

“I’m not worried about the virus or getting sick due to the low numbers in the Bow Valley,” Weiss said. “And being equipped with the proper PPE and taking all necessary precautions.”

He is outside for most of his workday and happy to be there, he said.

“I love this job as it lets me be outside getting exercise and interacting with the community,” Weiss said. “I’ve been doing it for almost two years.”

The community has been appreciative that he is still on the job.

“People have been awesome to me during this time,” Weiss said. “Very thankful and supportive that we are still delivering their letter mail and packages during a time when they have limited access to the town and its services.”

The community mailboxes can fit a wide variety of parcels, he said.

“What does not fit I gladly hand deliver to customers’ doors to ensure they receive their goods,” Weiss said.

It’s been business as usual with not much downtime at the job. And the typical stereotype of dogs versus mail carriers does not apply, he said.

“I love cats and dogs and I am always happy to have interaction with them while working,” Weiss said. “Never had any bad experiences with them.”

When he isn’t working, he skateboards, snowboards, mountain bikes and tries to keep up with his cross fit workouts, despite the gym being closed for the time being, Weiss said.

“I started skateboarding in the early 70’s skateboard boom and rode my board to school in Calgary at elementary, junior high, and high school,” Weiss said. “I recall getting chased by teachers down the hallways while riding it back in my younger years. Carving and grinding the bowls in Canmore and Banff is a passion of mine that will never die. Both parks are killer and open now and I hit them whenever I have the time and weather permits. I’ve made countless friends skating at them over the years.”

Weiss carries the nickname Snaketrick, because of the boa constrictor cowboy boots he wore in high school. But he doesn’t mind if you call him that.

“I feel very fortunate to live and work in Canmore as it lets me pursue all the outdoor sports that I love,” Weiss said.

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Barrie bylaw has change of heart over girl's Canadian flag chalk art – CTV News

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BARRIE, ONT. —
A Barrie family is thankful for the community support after the City of Barrie apologized for issuing a bylaw warning demanding the removal of a Canadian flag painted on the end of their driveway on city property.

The city issued a statement on Friday. It reads in part, “The city issued a warning to the property owner (not the child), but after further investigation, it was determined that given the nature of the infraction, City Enforcement Services staff will revoke the warning.”

City staff said a complaint was called in about the chalk art painting, prompting a bylaw officer to investigate the claim.

The city’s change of heart has left 10-year-old Kayla van Kessel smiling.

The Barrie girl painted the Canadian flag on a chunk of grass at the end of their property to celebrate Canada Day.

ORIGINAL STORY:

Erin van Kessel said she was sitting outside her north-end Barrie home Thursday morning when a bylaw officer handed her a warning.

The Barrie resident was told she would have to remove chalk art of a Canadian flag drawn by her 10-year-old daughter to celebrate Canada Day.

“2004-142-2,” recited van Kessel, while looking over the document citing her infraction. The city’s bylaw for that particular code refers to the use of public property.

“No person shall throw, drop, place, or otherwise deposit garbage, paper, paper or plastic products, cans, rubbish, or other debris on any city property unless authorized by the city,” she read.

Van Kessel said large green plastic objects, which may have been children’s items left at the curb near the end of her driveway, did not belong to her.

The issue with the chalk art, however, has left her disappointed.

Van Kessel was told by the bylaw officer someone had complained about the chalk art spray painted on the lawn at the end of her driveway.

The chunk of grass, painted red and white, is city property.

“They couldn’t really say why. I mean, mostly because it is on city property, but really?” said van Kessel in response to the bylaw violation.

Van Kessel was told she had 24 hours to remove her daughter’s chalk painting from the lawn or face a potential fine.

Van Kessel said her daughter is distraught and doesn’t understand why it needs to be removed.

“Not too happy,” said van Kessel. “Because she did put a lot of work into it, and now we have to remove it. It’s a child doing something exciting when she’s been stuck in the house for four months, and no school, no friends, so what more is there to do?”

The City of Barrie confirmed a complaint was made, and a bylaw officer visited the home, providing the following statement to CTV News:

“The city’s enforcement services received and responded to a complaint about individuals painting on city property.

Bylaw officers are obligated to investigate and respond to all complaints received. While the homeowner advised that the paint was washable, the officer was unable to confirm if it was or not, which was why the property owner was warned that they had 24 hours to remove it from the city’s boulevard.

A warning was issued to the property owner, not the child.”

Van Kessel said she does intend to remove the artwork.

“I guess other people don’t appreciate it or look at it the same way we do,” she said.

“What can you do? I guess it’s the way of the world these days.”

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Passionate about art and how to frame it – paNOW

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Zelensky recently purchased Christina Thoen’s framing business and the building its situated in.

“The art school is busy and she [Thoen] was looking for help and it just seemed to be a good fit. I love the framing end of it, and I saw a vision of offering space for other artist to sell their art and it just progressed from there. After spending the past seven years as an art student of Christina’s, I definitely feel a connection…it’s comfortable.” Zelensky said.

Various local artists are featured on the walls. At least four of them are students from Thoen’s art school and Zelensky predicts more local artisans will be looking to find good and safe options to display their work in the midst of the global COVID-19 pandemic, when art shows or trade shows can’t take place.

“Taking possession of the business in mid-April allowed me to ease into the business and determine what would be best for the artists and my customers. I am always looking at the precautions and making sure customers and artists feel safe coming in,” she said.

She invites any artists wanting to display and sell their work to visit her in store for available gallery space. Supporting local artisans and what she calls ‘phenomenal talent’ in and around Prince Albert is a win-win for Zelensky. Artists benefit from her customers and she can add life and visual interest to the pieces through her frame work. But, it is not just the local artwork Zelensky helps to enhance….

The right frame, mount and mat forms can add life and visual interest to pictures as well. Zelensky said now is the perfect time to sort out those special moments you have always meant to get framed. Whether it’s beautiful art from your kids or family photos, she can help showcase the treasured pieces through the framing process.

Born and raised in and around Prince Albert, Zelensky believes in supporting local. She and her husband farm northeast of the city where they raised their four children.

“I love this town and the diversity it offers.”

The shop is equipped with proper barriers for safe in-person consultations or customers can leave their prints with Zelensky and choose to do a consult by video call.

Currently, custom frame orders for grad photos are being discounted by 20 per cent.

Sandra’s Framing, Gallery and Gifts is located 625 Brandon Drive. Visit the Facebook page or give Sandra a call at (639) 739-7599.

*This content was created by paNOW’s commercial content division.

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Barrie bylaw demands 10-year-old's Canadian flag art be removed from city property – CTV News

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BARRIE, ONT. —
Erin van Kessel said she was sitting outside her north-end Barrie home Thursday morning when a bylaw officer handed her a warning.

The Barrie resident was told she would have to remove chalk art of a Canadian flag drawn by her 10-year-old daughter to celebrate Canada Day.

“2004-142-2,” recited van Kessel, while looking over the document citing her infraction. The city’s bylaw for that particular code refers to the use of public property.

“No person shall throw, drop, place, or otherwise deposit garbage, paper, paper or plastic products, cans, rubbish, or other debris on any city property unless authorized by the city,” she read.

Van Kessel said large green plastic objects, which may have been children’s items left at the curb near the end of her driveway, did not belong to her.

The issue with the chalk art, however, has left her disappointed.

Van Kessel was told by the bylaw officer someone had complained about the chalk art spray painted on the lawn at the end of her driveway.

The chunk of grass, painted red and white, is city property.

“They couldn’t really say why. I mean, mostly because it is on city property, but really?” said van Kessel in response to the bylaw violation.

Van Kessel was told she had 24 hours to remove her daughter’s chalk painting from the lawn or face a potential fine.

Van Kessel said her daughter is distraught and doesn’t understand why it needs to be removed.

“Not too happy,” said van Kessel. “Because she did put a lot of work into it, and now we have to remove it. It’s a child doing something exciting when she’s been stuck in the house for four months, and no school, no friends, so what more is there to do?”

The City of Barrie confirmed a complaint was made, and a bylaw officer visited the home, providing the following statement to CTV News:

“The city’s enforcement services received and responded to a complaint about individuals painting on city property.

Bylaw officers are obligated to investigate and respond to all complaints received. While the homeowner advised that the paint was washable, the officer was unable to confirm if it was or not, which was why the property owner was warned that they had 24 hours to remove it from the city’s boulevard.

A warning was issued to the property owner, not the child.”

Van Kessel said she does intend to remove the artwork.

“I guess other people don’t appreciate it or look at it the same way we do,” she said.

“What can you do? I guess it’s the way of the world these days.”

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