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Art from isolation: the fourth instalment of with.draw.all – St. Albert TODAY

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While students continue to learn from home, art students from three of St. Albert’s high schools are contributing to with.draw.all, which will be posted to the Gazette’s website every second Thursday.

Artist: Eleanor Bordian
Grade 11
Medium: Chalk pastels
Artist statement: “Our challenge was drawing our favourite character in chalk pastels. Portraits can be drawn in so many mediums and I really enjoy drawing and painting them.”

 
Shannon Ruddy Fine Art PhotoArtist: Shannon Ruddy
Grade 12
Medium: Photography
Artist statement: “I decided to express a few things that I care about into a photo.”

 
Aislinn LibichArtist: Aislinn Libich
Grade 11
Medium: Collage
Artist statement: “The weekly challenge was to choose a household item and incorporate it into my artwork. I chose a binder clip and incorporated it into the body of a dragonfly. I then completed the rest of my drawing with four complimentary colours to complete my drawing.”

 
Jayda Gardner in my fridgeArtist: Jayda Gardner
Grade 11
Artist statement: “I’ve never thought to draw the insides of my fridge before. The different shapes and shadows the items in my fridge created piqued my interest and so I focused on a few items. I really enjoyed this challenge.”

 
Chantal LafraniereArtist: Chantal Lafraniere
Grade 11
Title: Starry High Tops
Medium: Coloured scrapbooking paper and magazines
Artist statement: “It was a lot of fun creating this collage by finding cool textures from magazines and piecing them together to create an image. I also tried to use some darker and lighter textures to add light and shadows to give the collage more dimensions. Art has been helping me during COVID time by encouraging creativity, and fun hobbies to pursue during this pandemic.”

 
Avery WitterArtist: Avery Witter
Grade 12
Title: COFFEE
Medium: Letters cut into squares from an old fashion magazine
Artist statement: “During this pandemic, art has helped me a lot. It helps me cure my boredom, which not even the television can do anymore. It also helps me to relieve stress and forget about what is happening in the world for just a few moments. I find myself being way less productive during this pandemic so art is one of those things that makes me feel productive and helps me start my day on a productive path. I aim to start my mornings by doing any type of art. It helps me get into the right mind space and also helps me set a bit of a routine.”

 
Cierra Santiago copyArtist: Cierra Santiago
Grade 12
Title: Dear COVID-19
Medium: Magazine cutouts
Artist statement: “The process of this piece was very simple yet revealed my creativity and true emotion. I decided to create my piece about COVID-19 because there is not a day that passes without thinking or even being reminded of this awful pandemic. Although my piece is very simple, the meaning varies and is understandable to many. “I miss the normal life” is clearly referring to my life before this pandemic. I often think about how my high school experience is not how I imagined and how our graduation, the day I have been waiting for almost all my life, is being taken away and replaced with something not even close to what I envisioned. This pandemic has been an unexpected journey full of emotion and has impacted my life drastically but also has helped me explore my abilities and skills. I am very thankful for all parents and teachers supporting their children and students during this time and trying their hardest to make sure our school experience is as best as it can be.
Personally creating art during this pandemic has been a complete escape for me and has helped my creativity develop even more. Quarantine has helped me create pieces that I didn’t even know I was capable of doing. When creating art my mind is placed somewhere else, where I forget all my problems and all the negatives of this pandemic. Although COVID-19 has ruined many opportunities for individuals there are still positives during this pandemic. Despite all the negatives of the COVID-19 pandemic, it has really helped me appreciate and enjoy my art skills to another level.

 
Lee AndersonArtist: Lee Anderson
Grade 11
Medium: Pencil and marker
Artist statement: “It has been a busy time for me but I always find time to explore my characters.”

 
Dax ZieselArtist: Dax Ziesel
Grade 11
Medium: Pencil
Artist statement: “This challenge was to draw a face pressed up against glass. The portrait became more about the shadow and light and less about getting a likeness.”

 

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Sunflower Highway, art initiative to connect Fraser Valley, Thompson-Nicola and Okanagan – Chilliwack Progress

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An art initiative originating from Cache Creek’s Gold Country aims to bring B.C. communities together during the difficult times bought on by the COVID-19 pandemic.

‘The Sunflower Project’ is also an environmental renewal project, taking rediscovered satellite dishes and other debris and making them into large 3D sunflower models.

Lead artist and project architect Michelle Loughery said the goal is to have a series of living art installations in various cities and towns, which will include the sunflowers made out of reclaimed materials, as well as real living sunflowers.

Loughery said the idea for the project originated in 1999 when she moved to Vernon and started work on a mural project to help revitalize the city’s downtown area.

“It was the perfect timing because the downtown association was looking for murals and they wanted to completely rebuild their downtown. So we worked together and created the downtown Vernon mural project,” she said.

“And that collaboration of leading a legacy of tourism while building infrastructure helped my career soar… and now I get to do it again as my swansong for other communities.”

The project’s goal is to have the living art installations put together to make up a ‘Sunflower Highway’, which Loughery said will be a driveable art route. Executive director of the Gold Country Communities Society Marcie Down said the art route will help B.C.’s rural communities safely gain tourist traffic.

“Some of the communities involved include Ashcroft, Cache Creek, and Clinton, so it’s a very big region. Then that will interconnect with others as well. There are just so many rural communities that need a hand during these times,” Down said.

“It’s driveable tourism. If we get hit again (with COVID-19), at least we can still drive by and have some sunflower sightings,” Loughery said.

Loughery and Down said they also want the project to be symbolic of the Gold Rush.

“The highway kind of recreates the Gold Rush route. The Gold Rush did an awful lot for the economy… so we’re going back to that thought, tracing the route, paying tribute to the immigrants and of course our Indigenous peoples,” Loughery said.

“The sunflower is indigenous to North America. (Russian czar) Peter the Great took the sunflower back to Ukraine and Russia to help build their economy and now we’re bringing it back to say ‘hey, how can we build an economy again around people, place and planet?’”

Loughery and Down are encouraging artists and residents to get involved, either by painting sunflowers or planting them. For more information, visit the project’s website.

READ: Collaborative effort to showcase historic Indigenous children’s art

READ: Exhibit highlighting Okanagan women launches in Kelowna


Twila Amato
Video journalist, Black Press Okanagan

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Ottawa Art Gallery, Diefenbunker Museum reopen to visitors – CBC.ca

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The Ottawa Art Gallery and the Diefenbunker Museum reopened to visitors Wednesday for the first time since the COVID-19 shutdown began.

“[We’re] very, very happy that after 117 days we’re welcoming everyone back,” Alexandra Badzak, director and CEO for the Ottawa Art Gallery, told CBC’s Ottawa Morning on Wednesday.

The downtown gallery is reopening to front-line workers on Wednesday and to the general public on Thursday.

Gallery hours have changed in order to give staff time to clean and disinfect the building, Badzak said. The OAG is now open Wednesday to Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Older adults and people who are immunocompromised will have priority access to the gallery for the first hour each day, from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

“We’ve put in a whole bunch of measures that are going to keep our public really safe,” Badzak said.

The gallery has installed “fun and creative” signals throughout to remind visitors to stay two metres apart, but otherwise they’ll have freedom to roam.

“We didn’t want to do a whole bunch of arrows everywhere,” Badzak said. “We wanted people to be able to explore.”

They’ve dusted off the A.Y. Jacksons. And disinfected every hand rail and elevator button. Now the Ottawa Art Gallery is reopening its doors to visitors — after more than 100 days closed for the pandemic. 6:10

Both the OAG and the Diefenbunker Museum in Carp are asking visitors to register or buy tickets before they arrive.

At the OAG, people can book a time slot online or by phone. At the Diefenbunker, visitors are asked to purchase tickets online before they arrive, but they won’t be required to use them at any particular time.

If the Diefenbunker gets too busy, the museum’s website says visitors may have to wait outside.

Visitors to both venues are required to wear cloth masks, which are now mandatory in all public, indoor settings throughout Ottawa and the surrounding area.

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Three local artists selected for County's Art in the Park project – EverythingGP

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Daelyn Biendarra piece “Dream View” was selected as one of the three winners for Site 1 (Photo supplied by Daelyn Biendarra)

By Liam Verster

Local artwork on display

Jul 08, 2020

The County of Grande Prairie has selected three local artists to be featured at the Clairmont Adventure Park.

The County’s Art for the Park project panel of judges have selected three submissions which will be installed at Site 1, which is along the wooden residential fences of the park’s east boundary. The winners are Daelyn Biendarra and her piece Dream View, Cassidy Guenther for her work Skateboarder.png, and Quinn Goldberg and her submission Fox Mountain.

Goldberg was also the winner of the Site 2 submission, which required concepts or ideas for an art installation along the fences of the Clairmont Adventure Park. Her idea of a Honeybee Conservation Education Project was selected, and she will work along with County Staff and young artists to place cutouts of bees and other important pollinators along the chain-link fence. Residents will also have an opportunity to contribute to the project, by painting individual components of the piece.

“We’re delighted that so many young artists participated in this project,” says Christine Rawlins, Parks and Recreation Manager in a release. “The Adventure Park is a community gathering place and these pieces of art will add an inviting touch, made more meaningful by local resident contributions.”

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