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Arts, culture, fun in London this weekend and beyond (Jan. 23-29) – The London Free Press

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What’s happening in and around London this weekend and next week.


John Rowlands was assigned by a magazine to take photos of Lady Gaga in Ottawa in 2014, but was invited to stay and shoot the entire show when her road crew recognized him. Rowlands will talk about his early years and work with some of the music industry’s biggest stars at the Jet Aircraft Museum at London International Airport Saturday. (John Robert Rowlands/Special to London Free Press)


What’s happening in and around London this weekend and next week:

CLUBS

Call the Office: White Cowbell Oklahoma, Saturday, 9 p.m., $15; 216 York St.

Eastside Bar and Grill: Second Chance, Friday, 10 p.m.; Dave’s Not Here, Saturday, 10 p.m.; Blues Jam, Sunday, 3 p.m.; Eastside Open Jam Night, Wednesday, 8 p.m.; 750 Hamilton Rd.; 519-457-7467.

Jimbo’s Pub And Eatery: Karaoke party, Fridays, 10 p.m. and Tuesdays, 8 p.m.; 920 Commissioners Rd. E.; 519-204-7991 or visit www.jimbospub.ca.

London Music Club: Mudmen, Friday, 7 p.m., Pat Robitaille, 7 p.m., Acoustic Open Mic, 7:30 p.m.; Night Of Rock and Blues Fundraiser, Saturday, 7 p.m.; SOUP Ukulele Jam, Wednesday, 6:45 p.m.; 470 Colborne St.; 519-640-6996.

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London Music Hall: Half Moon run, Taylor Janzen, Tuesday, 7 p.m., $30, all ages; 185 Queens Ave.; 519-432-1107.

London Wine Bar: Live blues with Rick Taylor, Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m., no cover; 420 Talbot St.; call 519-913-3400 or e-mail info@londonwinebar.ca for reservations; walk-ins welcome.

Mustang Sally’s: Wheel House, Friday, 9:30 p.m.; Men Without Cats, Saturday, 9:30 p.m.; Acoustic Jam with Alan Lynch, Bobby Keener, Jack Coveney, Don Oullette and Friends, Tuesdays, 10 p.m.; Lonnie Chicago, Wednesdays, 6:30 p.m.; 99 Belmont Drive, 519-649-7688.

Rum Runners: The Blue Stones, Mute Choir, Friday, 8 p.m. (sold out); 178 Dundas St.; 519-432-1107.

St. Regis Tavern: Musical Chairs with The Tiger Beats and The Thing From Outer Space, Saturday, 9 p.m., pay-what-you-will; 625 Dundas St.; 519-432-0162.

Wortley Roadhouse: The Fish, Friday and Saturday; After Midnight, Sunday, 4-8 p.m.; 190 Wortley Rd.; 519-438-5141.


DANCING

Come Dancing: Ballroom, Latin and swing dancing, Friday at Polish Hall, 554 Hill St.; line dance lesson with Kathie at 7:30 p.m., followed by dancing with Wolfeman music host at 8 p.m.; admission: $10, snacks on the tables; all welcome; 519-433-2579.

Latin Dance Night: Come out and do the Salsa, Merengue, Reggaeton and Bachata with DJ Alexander, Saturday, 9 p.m., free; Jimbo’s Pub, 920 Commissioners Rd. E.; 519-204-7991 or visit www.jimbospub.ca.

London Ballroom Dance Club: Workshop, Saturday, 7:30 p.m., followed by general dancing at 8 p.m. at Polish Hall, 554 Hill St.; admission: $20, includes coffee, tea, desserts; visit londonballroomdanceclub.ca.

Royal Canadian Legion – Dorchester: Dance to the music of The Kebobs, Saturday, 2-5 p.m., free; 1227 Donnybrook Dr., Dorchester; 519-268-8538.

Royal Canadian Legion – Lambeth: Dance to the music of Allan James, Saturday, 2-5 p.m., free; 7097 Kilbourne Rd.; 519-652-3412.

Royal Canadian Legion – Victory: Guydith Jamboree, Sunday, 1-4:30 p.m. on the main floor, admission: musicians $3, public $5; 311 Oakland Ave.

Royal Canadian Legion – Woodstock: Dance to the music of Midlife Crisis, Saturday, 8 p.m., $5; 642 Dundas St., Woodstock; 519-537-3117.

Singles Dance Party: Dance to music by Wolfeman DJ, Saturday, 8 p.m. in the Big Hall at Marconi Club, 120 Clarke Rd.; admission: $13, all welcome; 519-433-2579 or visit www.wolfemandj.com.

Thursday Tunes and Dancing: Musicians, dancers and spectators welcome, every Thursday, 1-3:30 p.m. at Libro Hall, 239 Fleming Dr., Clinton; admission by donation; 519-476-5922 or e-mail angela.smith@centralhuron.com.


ETC.

2020 Speaker Series: Western University Professor Jonathan Vance presents, Steve McQueen on a Motorbike: The Great Escape and Popular Culture, Thursday, 6 p.m. at Royal Canadian Regiment Museum at Wolseley Barracks, 701 Oxford St. E.; free admission; visit www.thercrmuseum.ca.


Steve McQueen escapes on a motorcycle in The Great Escape.

An Evening with John Rowlands: John has been photographing music and movie celebrities since 1960, come hear his stories and see his images, Saturday, 7 p.m. at Jet Aircraft Museum, 2465 Aviation lane, Unit 2; tickets: $15 advance or $20 at the door; 519-453-7000 or visit jetaircraftmuseum.ca.

Book Launch and Signing: Communication is Care: 9 Empowering Strategies to Guide Patient Healing with Jennifer George, Saturday, 1-4 p.m. at Indigo, 1037 Wellington Rd. S.

CMHA – Sharing our Stories for Bell Let’s Talk Day: Listen to recovery stories, meet individuals with lived experience, and visit with a St. John Ambulance Therapy Dog, Wednesday, 1-3 p.m. at Central Library, 251 Dundas St.; free event, everyone welcome; in partnership with the Canadian Mental Health Association Middlesex.

FIMS Making Matters Lecture Series: Open Platforms – Developing Culture in the Age of Big Data TV, presented by Aymar Jean Christian, Associate Professor of Communication, Northwestern University, and founder of Open TV, Thursday, 4 p.m. at Western University, FIMS and Nursing Building, 2nd Floor Creative Commons, 1151 Richmond St.; free admission; 519-661-2111 ext. 88493.

London West New Year’s Levee: Join MPP Peggy Sattler at the annual levee, event includes the presentation of Community Recognition Awards, live music, and a light supper, Thursday, 6:30 p.m. at Byron Legion, 1276 Commissioners Rd. W.; free admission; RSVP online at londonwestlevee.eventbrite.com.


GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS

Art Emporium: Work by regional artists and artisans working in many mediums and disciplines; winter hours: Saturday, Sunday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. or by appointment; 177 Main St., Port Stanley; 226-658-1888 or visit www.ArtEmporium.ca.

ArtVenture Art Studio: A combination of embroidery, textiles and text is the theme of the exhibit featuring artwork of local artist Cassie Morris, runs till Jan. 31; hours: Monday to Thursday, 4-8 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; 1438 Aldersbrook Rd.; 519-471-4278 or visit www.artventure.ca.

Art With Panache: Artists featured for January include Julia Armstrong, Audrey Cooper, Margaret Crosby, Kit Cutting, Nic DeGroot, Lois Fuchs, Tony Furlong, Andrew Gillett, Mary Lillyman, Lynne Pinchin, Paul Snoddy, Lyn Tremblay and Lisa Verbakel; hours: Monday to Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Talbot Centre, 140 Fullarton St.; 519-870-7218.

Eldon House: London’s oldest residence contains family heirlooms, furnishings and priceless treasures of the Harris Family; hours: Thursday to Sunday, noon-5 p.m.; admission by donation; 481 Ridout St. N.; 519-661-5169 or visit www.eldonhouse.ca.

Forest City Gallery: Through Clenched Teeth exhibition, runs till Feb. 7; 258 Richmond St.; visit forestcitygallery.com.

Gallery in the Grove: Connexions, exhibition celebrates artists who have shared in our 40-year evolution, runs till Feb. 22; 2618 Hamilton Rd. at Wildwood Park, Bright’s Grove; visit www.galleryinthegrove.com.

Ingersoll Creative Arts Centre: Altered States, photography by Werner Braun, runs till Feb. 2; hours: Monday to Friday, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Sunday, 1-4 p.m.; 125 Centennial Lane, Victoria Park, Ingersoll; 519-485-4691 or visit www.creativeartscentre.com.

Jet Aircraft Museum: Evening with John Rowlands, rock ‘n roll photographer, Saturday, 7 p.m., $20; Cold War era jet aircraft and historic displays honouring Canadian aviation heritage; hours: Thursday to Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; admission by donation; 2465 Aviation Lane, Unit 2; 519-453-7000 or visit jetaircraftmuseum.ca.


London-based photographer John Rowlands caught this iconic image of David Bowie in 1976 during the Station to Station tour stop in Toronto. It is the photo Rowlands treasurers the most from a career that’s spanned five decades and continues. (John Robert Rowlands/Special to London Free Press)

McIntosh Gallery: Gerard Pas: Broken Body exhibition, runs till Feb. 22; hours: Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, noon-4 p.m.; Western University, 1151 Richmond St.; 519-661-2111, ext. 87576.

Michael Gibson Gallery: Chroma II: The Complexity of Colour, group exhibition featuring works by Mark Dicey, Jonathan Forrest, James Kirkpatrick, Ron Martin, William Perehudoff, Gordon Rayner, Jonathan Syme, David Urban and Hans Wendt, runs till Feb. 1; hours: Wednesday to Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; 157 Carling St.; 519-439-0451 or visit www.gibsongallery.com.

Museum London: The Lost City: Ian MacEachern’s Photographs of Saint John, ends Sunday; 421 Ridout St.; 519-661-0333.

Portside Gallery: Featured artists for January are Jean Johnson, S’ine Maule and Len Hughes; 18 area artists showing original paintings, photography, jewelry, hand-painted scarves and cards; hours: Thursday to Monday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. (weather permitting); 187 1/2 Main St., Port Stanley; 519-782-7066 or visit portsidegallery.ca.

St. Thomas-Elgin Public Art Centre: Contemporary Selections from the Permanent Collection: Celebrating 50 Years, in Gallery One and Two and White Walls and Substantial Forms: Small Sculpture from the Permanent Collection, in Gallery Three, both exhibits run till Feb. 15; hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Thursday, Friday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Saturday, noon-4 p.m., Sunday, noon-3 p.m.; 301 Talbot St., St. Thomas; 519-631-4040.


Lagoon of the Andes, by artist César Morriss, a native of Peru, is part of TD Sunfest’s 14th Colores de LatinoAmerica show at London’s TAP Centre for Creativity until Feb. 1.

TAP Centre For Creativity: Colores de Latinoamerica ’20, 14th annual visual art exhibition featuring Andrea Vela Alarcon (Peru), Ana Arias, aka Ansoara (Venezuela), Enrique Bravo (Venezuela), Jacquie Comrie (Panama), Cesar Morriss (Peru) and Michelle Peraza (Costa Rica and Cuba), opening reception Friday, 7 p.m. with music by The Alfredo Caxaj Latin Jazz Ensemble, runs till Feb. 1; free admission; 203 Dundas St.; 519-642-2767 or visit www.tapcreativity.org.

Westland Gallery: The Gallery Artists Group Exhibition, ends Saturday; Winter Collection: London and more, featuring works by Dana Cowie, Geoff Farnsworth, MaryAnn Hendriks, Samantha Chilvers, Angie Quick and Curtis Doherty, opens Tuesday, runs till Feb. 15; hours: Tuesday to Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday, noon-4 p.m.; 156 Wortley Rd.; 519-601-4420 or visit www.westlandgallery.ca.

Woodstock Art Gallery: Dancing on the Grave: Dil Hildebrand and Patrick Thibert and Life on the Back of a Turtle: Woodlands and Plains Indigenous Art, both exhibits end Saturday; Walk On: ongoing sculpture project of John McEwen, runs till June 27; 449 Dundas St., Woodstock; 519-539-6761.


MUSIC

Alex Cuba: Thursday, 8 p.m. at Wolf Performance Hall, Central Library, 251 Dundas St.; tickets: $25 advance available at Centennial hall, Long and McQuade North, Village Idiot, online at sunfest.on.ca and eventbrite or by calling 519-672-1522, or $30 at the door.


Multi-award-winning singer Alex Cuba returns with a new album that looks to his musical roots.

Brantley Gilbert: Fire’T Up Tour with special guests Dylan Scott and Brandon Lay, Thursday, 7:30 p.m. at Budweiser Gardens, 99 Dundas St.; tickets: $50.25-$80.25 online at budweisergardens.com.

Chamber Concert: Music by Mozart, Beethoven and Piazzola featuring Mary-Elizabeth Brown and Marion Miller, Sunday, 2-4 p.m. at First-St. Andrew’s United Church, 350 Queens Ave.; tickets: adults $20, students $10 at the door; visit www.fsaunited.com.

Jeffery Concert: Chamber Music of Mozart and Boccherini preformed by Jan De Winne, Laura Andriani, Rossella Croce, Isaac Chalk, and Elinor Frey, Saturday, 8 p.m. at Wolf Performance Hall, Central Library, 251 Dundas St.; tickets: $40 by calling 519-672-8800 or visit www.jefferyconcerts.com.

London Symphonia: Baroque Insults featuring actor Rod Beattie, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. at Talbot Street Church, 513 Talbot St.; tickets: adults $29, students $12 available online at www.londonsymphonia.ca.


OUTDOORS

Nature in the City: Fishing for a Healthy Thames River with Robert Huber, President of the Thames River Anglers, who will share his experiences as an angler and passionate advocate for a healthy Thames, highlighting the improving biodiversity of the river and ongoing projects that continue to improve water quality, habitat and eco-friendly access, Tuesday, 7 p.m. at Wolf Performance Hall, Central Library, 251 Dundas St., free admission; co-sponsored by Nature London and London Public Library.

Nature London: Dr. Patricia Corcoran, Associate Professor, Dept. of Earth Sciences at Western University will be speaking about her research on the distribution and deposition of microplastics in Lake Huron, topics will include the global effect on Earth’s environment, Friday, 7:30 p.m. at London Civic Garden Complex, 625 Springbank Dr.; admission: $5 for non-members, all welcome.

Saturday Morning Walks: Walk through Gibbons Park, meet at car park at the west end of Victoria Street next to 29 Victoria St.; walks are approximately one hour; families with children are welcome, no dogs; John Clark, 519-641-0442 or visit www.tvta.ca.


THEATRE

Grand Theatre: Fully Committed, ends Sunday on Spriet Stage; Every Brilliant Thing, opens Thursday, runs till Feb. 2 on McManus Stage; 471 Richmond St.; 519-672-9030 or visit grandtheatre.com.

London Community Players: You are Here, ends Sunday at Palace Theatre, 710 Dundas St.; 519-432-1029 or visit www.palacetheatre.ca.

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Ehiko: The Multidisciplinary Artist Shaping Decolonization Through Art

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Ehiko, a multidisciplinary artist born in Lagos, Nigeria, now calls Toronto, Ontario, her home. An OCAD University graduate, she has gained recognition for her powerful and evocative works that delve into the complexities of decolonization, health and wellness, spirituality, sexual violence, and the representation of melanated hair.

Ehiko’s artistic journey began in the vibrant city of Lagos, where the rich cultural heritage and traditional artistry influenced her deeply. This foundation blossomed in Toronto, where she continued to experiment and manipulate raw canvas due to its flexibility. Her expressive palette and the use of various textiles pay homage to traditional Nigerian craftsmanship, creating a unique blend of contemporary and ancestral art forms.

Her works are not just visually striking but also laden with profound messages. Ehiko’s exploration of decolonization is evident in her large-scale multi-medium paintings, performances, drawings, and installations. Each piece she creates is a testament to her commitment to unravelling spirituality linked to traditional Afrakan masks, presenting a dialogue between the past and present.

One of the central themes in Ehiko’s work is health and wellness, particularly within the context of the Black community. She addresses the often-overlooked aspects of mental health and the importance of wellness practices rooted in African traditions. Through her art, Ehiko encourages a reconnection with these practices, promoting healing and resilience.

Sexual violence is another critical subject Ehiko tackles with sensitivity and boldness. Her works often depict the pain and trauma associated with such experiences while also highlighting the strength and resilience of survivors. By bringing these issues to the forefront, she fosters conversations that are essential for societal change and healing.

The representation of melanated hair in Ehiko’s art is a celebration of Black identity and beauty. Her pieces challenge societal norms and stereotypes, presenting Black hair in its diverse and natural forms. This representation is not only about aesthetics but also about reclaiming cultural identity and pride.

Ehiko’s exhibitions in Lagos and Toronto have garnered significant attention, and her private collection of purchased work is available upon request. Her contributions to the art world extend beyond her creations; she is also an advocate for using art as a tool for social change and empowerment.

In every piece, Ehiko weaves her experiences, heritage, and vision, creating a tapestry that speaks to the heart and mind. Her work is a powerful reminder of the role of art in decolonization and healing, and her journey continues to inspire and influence the global art community.

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Home + Away artwork opens in Vancouver’s Hastings Park

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A new art installation now towers over Vancouver’s Hastings Park fields in celebration of the city’s history of spectators and sports.

Home + Away is a sculpture by Seattle artists Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo of Lead Pencil Studio, which opened Monday in the southeast end of the historic park.

It’s a 17-metre-tall structure that resembles a narrow set of bleachers — similar to the stands of the Empire Stadium, which stood on the site of the park from 1954 to 1993 and hosted The Beatles, among many others. It recalls a covered ski jump that stood there in the 1950s and the nearby wooden rollercoaster at the PNE.

The city says the public is invited to walk the stairs and sit on the benches.

“In addition to being visually striking, this artwork is intended to be ascended, sat on and experienced. It offers exciting experiences of height and views and provides 16 rows of seating for up to 49 people, making for a unique spectator experience when watching events at Empire Fields,” the city said in a release Monday.

The idea for the park to include public art was outlined in the Hastings Park “Master Plan,” first adopted by the city in 2010. The city says Han and Mihalyo first presented their design in 2015.

“It’s wonderful to see this piece realized within the context of such a well-used public space,” said Han.

Home + Away was inspired directly by the site history of spectatorship, and we hope it will connect Hastings Park users to that history and the majestic views of the environment for many decades to come,” added Mihalyo.

The artwork features a large light-up sign, in the style of a sports scoreboard, that reads “HOME” and “AWAY.”

 

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Bill Viola, Video Artist Who Established the Medium as an Integral Part of Contemporary Art, Dies at 73

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Bill Viola, whose decades-long engagement with video proved vital in establishing the medium as an integral part of contemporary art, died on July 12 at his home in Long Beach, California. He was at 73 years old. The cause was complications related to Alzheimer’s disease. The news of his passing was confirmed by James Cohan Gallery.

Viola’s works are centered around the idea of human consciousness and such fundamental experiences as birth, death, and spirituality. He delved into mystical traditions from Zen Buddhism to Islamic Sufism, as well as Western devotional art from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in his videos, which often juxtaposed themes of life and death, light and dark, noise and silence. These explorations were achieved by submerging viewers in both image and sound with cutting-edge technologies for their time.

“I first used the camera and lens as a surrogate eye, to bring things closer, or to magnify them, to experiment with perception, to extend vision and make lengthy observations of simple objects,” Viola said in a 2015 interview. “Once you do that, their essence becomes visible. So I suppose I was always interested in the inner life of the world around me.”

Beginning in the 1970s, Viola created videotapes, architectural video installations, sound environments, electronic music performances, flat panel video pieces, and works for television broadcast—all of which expanded the scope of the medium and established Viola as one of its most notable practitioner.

Video still of a man diving into water that has been reversed. The image is mostly black and teal.

In 2003 the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York; Tate, London; and the Centre Pompidou in Paris jointly acquired Bill Viola’s 2001 three-channel video installation Five Angels for the Millennium.

Photo Kira Perov/©Bill Viola Studio

Bill Viola was born in 1951. He grew up in Queens and Westbury, New York, and attended P.S. 20 in Flushing, before receiving his BFA in experimental studios from Syracuse University in 1973. There, he studied with visual art with the likes of Jack Nelson and electronic music with Franklin Morris.

Following his graduation, between 1973 to 1980, Viola studied and performed with composer David Tudor in the music group Rainforest, which later became known as Composers Inside Electronics. He also worked as technical director at the pioneering video studio Art/tapes/22 in Florence, Italy from 1974 to 1976. During that time he encountered the work of other seminal video artists like Nam June Paik, Bruce Nauman, and Vito Acconci.

Viola was subsequently an artist-in-residence at New York’s WNET Thirteen Television Laboratory between 1976 to 1983, wherein he created a series of works that premiered on television. He traveled to the Solomon Islands, Java, and Indonesia to record traditional performing arts between 1976 and 1977. Later that year, Viola was invited to show work at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia, by cultural arts director Kira Perov, with whom he married and began a lifelong collaboration.

He was appointed an instructor in advanced video at the California Institute of the Arts in Valencia, California in 1983. He was the Getty Research Institute scholar-in-residence in Los Angeles in 1998 and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2000.

In 1985, Viola received with a Guggenheim Fellowship for fine arts, and later that decade, in 1989, he was awarded the MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship. His work was also featured in some of the world’s most notable exhibitions, including Documenta VI in 1977, Documenta XI in 1992, the 1987 and 1993 editions of the Whitney Biennial, and the 2001 Venice Biennale.

In 1995, he represented the United States at the 46th edition of the Venice Biennale. For the pavilion, Viola produced the series of works “Buried Secrets,” including one of his most known works The Greeting, which offers a contemporary interpretation of Pontormo’s oil painting The Visitation (ca.1528–30). The Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin and New York’s Guggenheim Museum commissioned the digital fresco cycle in high-definition video, titled Going Forth By Day, in 2002.

Viola’s work was the subject of a major 25-year survey at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1997, which subsequently toured internationally. His work has been the subject of major museum retrospectives in the years since, including at the Grand Palais in Paris (in 2014), the Palazzo Strozzi in Florence (2017), the Guggenheim Bilbao in Spain (2017), and the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia (2019), as well as an exhibition pairing his work with that of Michelangelo at the Royal Academy of Art in London in 2019.

Viola is survived by his wife Kira Perov, who has been the executive director of his studio since 1978, and their two children.

“One thing that’s very exciting about video that has turned me on since I first saw this glowing image way back in 1970 is that it can be so much,” Viola said in a 1995 with Charlie Rose on the occasion of this US Pavilion at the Biennale. “Furthermore, what’s really exciting is I don’t think it’s been since really the Renaissance where artists have been able to use a medium that one could say is the dominant communication form in society.”

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