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Asteroid Bennu may be hollow according to a new study – SlashGear

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One of the more exciting things that NASA has done in recent memory is landing a probe on the surface of asteroid Bennu. OSIRIS-REx successfully touched down briefly on the asteroid’s surface and gobbled up a bunch of samples that will be returned to earth for study. After orbiting the asteroid for a couple of years, some new data has now been published that sheds more light on the asteroid’s composition.

Researchers from the University of Colorado announced findings based on data captured by the spacecraft in the two years it was in orbit that shows the asteroid is likely hollow. Department of aerospace engineering sciences Daniel Scheeres said it appears the void in the asteroid center could hold a couple of football fields.

Since the core of the asteroid appears to be weaker than the exterior, the asteroid’s survival over the long-term could be at risk. Scheeres says that in a million years or less, the entire asteroid could fly apart. By combining data recorded by OSIRIS-REx, the scientists could create a map of sorts of the gravity of the asteroid, suggesting that assumptions the inside was solid and rocky were wrong.

The team believes that the asteroid’s rotation could be responsible for the void inside. Over time, Bennu’s rotation is gaining speed, and they think it’s in the process of spinning itself into pieces. Since the core is low density, it’s easier for the entire asteroid to fall apart as it spins. Now that measurements of the gravity field of the asteroid over, the team of scientists have wrapped up their work on the OSIRIS-REx mission.

The results of their work have contributed to the plan to analyze samples that will be returned to earth by the spacecraft. The current plan will see the samples analyzed to determine the cohesion between grains, a key physical property that impacts the mass distribution observed in the study.

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Nasa to pay $1 to collect rocks from moon – Yahoo News Canada

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Life support of $41.5M given to West White Rose, but no guarantee oil project will restart

Husky Energy is getting $41.5 million from the Newfoundland and Labrador government to keep the idled West White Rose offshore oil project going, particularly to “protect the option of re-starting” in the next year — although there is no guarantee that will happen.The announcement came Thursday morning in a news conference that involved Premier Andrew Furey, provincial Energy Minister Andrew Parsons, federal Natural Resources Minister Seamus O’Regan and Husky senior vice-president Jonathan Brown. The money is coming from the government’s Oil and Gas Industry Recovery Fund, and is the first project to get financial help from that source.The $41.5 million is half the total project cost. Husky Energy will be kicking in the other half. Furey said the work related to the project will happen in 2021, and it will mean 331 jobs. Specifically, there will be 169 positions in project management and engineering, and 162 tradespersons at the Port of Argentia and a fabrication facility in Marystown.The money keeps the project — one of Newfoundland and Labrador’s biggest offshore operations — alive for now.> The signal you’ve received from Husky today is that they’re planning to move forward. – Andrew FureyIt’s known as “warm suspension,” and it’s only an option, not a certainty, that the project will fully re-start.”Everyone wants a crystal ball, but of course we don’t have one and we don’t have that certainty,” Furey told reporters following the conference.”But I think the signal you’ve received from Husky today is that they’re planning to move forward. They recognize the value of this project.”‘One heck of a Christmas surprise’: O’ReganO’Regan called the announcement “one heck of a Christmas surprise for Newfoundlanders and Labradorians and their families.”He said the announcement was not merely a “government handout” but instead called it a “strategic investment” in the offshore oil industry, which was thrown into turmoil this spring when the COVID-19 pandemic caused oil prices to plummet. “We believe in our workers, we believe in this industry and we believe in its future,” O’Regan added. O’Regan acknowledged there will not be an entirely smooth road in the coming months. “Spring is coming and the vaccines are coming, but we have a hard winter ahead,” he said.A ‘first step back in the right direction,’ says Husky VPBrown, Husky’s senior vice-president for the Atlantic region, said the announcement will put the project in a better position for a 2022 restart, allowing project capability and skilled workers in the province to be retained.”This is the first step back in the right direction for the White Rose project,” Brown said. “But one of many steps still ahead.”Brown said the announcement is positive news in what has been a “year of tough decisions” on the project, which has suspended construction until 2021.He said work in Marystown will continue on projects like life boats, helipads and a flare tower, while the maintenance and preservation program will continue in Argentia.Opposition, NDP looking for guaranteesFollowing the press conference, NDP Leader Alison Coffin voiced concern over the project’s continued precariousness, citing the agreement’s reliance on unnamed “conditions.””We’ve been given no idea of what those conditions are,” she told reporters Thursday.”Do we have to put even more money into this? Are the conditions that the price of oil has to go up?…We have no guarantees.”PC Leader Ches Crosbie echoed a similar sentiment, saying Furey “should be moving heaven and earth” to restart the project. He also questioned the number of new jobs to come from the announcement.”What we’re hearing is that the 331 jobs that they’re claiming, more than half of those … are already in existence,” he said. “So the actual number of jobs created by all that money is not what they’re claiming it’s going to be.”Coffin said the money could have been better spent diversifying the economy, opening more work opportunities for those who may not be able to re-enter the oil and gas sector.”I think there are better ways to spend this money, to ensure that the workers who need to go back to work have employment,” she said.Latest development in a roller coaster ride for workers, projectThat Oil and Gas Industry Recovery Fund was announced Sept. 25, with the federal government allocating $320 million for the N.L. government to support direct and indirect employment. Furey appointed a task force with the same name, chaired by Bill Fanning and Karen Winsor, who were also on hand for Thursday’s announcement. The announcement is the latest development in a saga that started in April, when Husky announced it was stopping construction on the project, as the global pandemic battered oil markets. Hundreds of workers were laid off.At the time, the project was nearly 60 per cent complete.In October, Husky said construction was cancelled for 2021 as well.That news came just days after Cenovus Energy announced it would buy Husky Energy in a deal worth nearly $4 billion. In a statement, Cenovus said regarding Husky’s operations in the province “the WWR [West White Rose] project is key to extending the life of the White Rose field. As we have said before, all options are on the table and accelerating abandonment remains a possibility.”When asked about Cenovus walking away from the project once the merger is complete, Brown said it’s too early to know. He said his team is committed to continuing the West White Rose project.”I think that really understates the level of commitment that we’ve already shown to the project,” he said. “The responsibility everyone feels to completing the project and the effort … don’t underestimate the importance of that.”He said a review of Husky’s East Coast operations that the corporation had announced in September are also still ongoing.”We have to create a path forward,” Brown said.”Yes, I’d love to have a decision tomorrow, but I’d also like … the economy to stabilize, the oil prices to improve, because they’ll provide a better basis for that decision.”Take that decision too early, it might not be the one you want.”Husky has been asking both the federal and provincial governments for money to save West White Rose, but both governments have rejected the company’s pitch to buy a stake in the project.Newfoundland and Labrador, through its Crown corporation Nalcor Energy, already owns a five per cent stake in the project.Read more stories from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

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VIDEO: Massive fireball lights up the sky in parts of Canada and the US – KamloopsBCNow

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Some people in parts of Canada and the United States witnessed a massive fireball streak through the sky yesterday.

Witnesses reported seeing a flash of light, and the moment was also caught on camera.

Footage from the EarthCam at the CN Tower in Toronto shows the flash of light and points out the meteor-like object soar through the sky.

The Geminid meteor shower is taking place this month, and promises to be one of the most active meteor showers of the year.

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Nasa sets prices for Moon dust – Bangkok Post

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Nasa has awarded contracts to four companies to collect lunar samples.

WASHINGTON: The US space agency Nasa awarded contracts to four companies on Thursday to collect lunar samples for US$1 to $15,000, rock-bottom prices that are intended to set a precedent for future exploitation of space resources by the private sector.

“I think it’s kind of amazing that we can buy lunar regolith from four companies for a total of $25,001,” said Phil McAlister, director of Nasa’s Commercial Spaceflight Division.

The contracts are with Lunar Outpost of Golden, Colorado for $1; ispace Japan of Tokyo for $5,000; ispace Europe of Luxembourg for $5,000; and Masten Space Systems of Mojave, California for $15,000.

The companies plan to carry out the collection during already scheduled unmanned missions to the Moon in 2022 and 2023.

The firms are to collect a small amount of lunar soil known as regolith from the Moon and to provide imagery to NASA of the collection and the collected material.

Ownership of the lunar soil will then be transferred to NASA and it will become the “sole property of NASA for the agency’s use under the Artemis program.”

Under the Artemis program, Nasa plans to land a man and a woman on the Moon by 2024 and lay the groundwork for sustainable exploration and an eventual mission to Mars.

“The precedent is a very important part of what we’re doing today,” said Mike Gold, NASA’s acting associate administrator for international and interagency relations.

“We think it’s very important to establish the precedent that the private sector entities can extract, can take these resources but Nasa can purchase and utilize them to fuel not only NASA’s activities, but a whole new dynamic era of public and private development and exploration on the Moon,” Gold said.

“We must learn to generate our own water, air and even fuel,” he said. “Living off the land will enable ambitious exploration activities that will result in awe inspiring science and unprecedented discoveries.”

Any lessons learned on the Moon would be crucial to an eventual mission to Mars.

“Human mission to Mars will be even more demanding and challenging than our lunar operations, which is why it’s so critical to learn from our experiences on the Moon and apply those lessons to Mars,” Gold said.

“We want to demonstrate explicitly that you can extract, you can utilize resources, and that we will be conducting those activities in full compliance with the Outer Space Treaty,” he said. “That’s the precedent that’s important. It’s important for America to lead, not just in technology, but in policy.”

The United States is seeking to establish a precedent because there is currently no international consensus on property rights in space and China and Russia have not reached an understanding with the United States on the subject.

The 1967 Outer Space Treaty is vague but it deems outer space to be “not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means.”

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