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B.C. Children's Hospital reports troubling influx of kids with colds and flu – Vancouver Sun

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Health officials say a surge in respiratory syncytial virus is happening earlier than normal this year.

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B.C. Children’s Hospital reported Wednesday a spike in non-COVID-19 respiratory viral illnesses, such as colds and flus in children.

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That means the emergency room has been busier than normal and long waiting times can be expected.

Thirty per cent of all cases in the hospital’s emergency department in the past month have been children with respiratory illnesses, according to Dr. Claire Seaton, a pediatrician at B.C. Children’s Hospital.

Rates of severe infection caused by COVID-19 remains low and overall only two per cent of people hospitalized in B.C. are under the age of 19.

“That hasn’t changed but what has changed is we are seeing a lot of other viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza, along with some of the other common cold viruses.”

Respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, is a common virus that causes infections of the lungs and respiratory tract, and most children have been infected with the virus by age two. RSV symptoms are mild in healthy children and adults but the virus can cause severe infection in young infants, especially those born prematurely, or young children who have heart of lung disease.

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Seaton said they didn’t see many children with colds or flus last year, so they are worried it’s going to get a lot busier in the emergency department because of the RSV surge.

It is not unusual to see a spike in cold and flu viruses after kids go back to school in September and October but this year the kids may have reduced immunity to these common illnesses because it just wasn’t around last year.

Public health measures such as wearing masks, keeping a physical distance, washing hands, and getting a flu vaccine can help to keep the kids safe, she said.

Part of the reason for the surge at B.C. Children’s may be because parents are worried their child has COVID-19 so they take them to the emergency room.

Seaton said if a child has a cough or the sniffles then it’s best to keep them home from school or take them to get a COVID test , but it’s not always necessary to go to the emergency room.

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“I think it’s important to realize that the viral surge has already increased hospitalization rates in other parts of Canada,” she said. “So the RSV surge, which normally happens in November, is happening earlier this year … and we are starting to see those cases here.”

If parents are worried about their child’s illness they can check symptoms on the B.C. Children’s Hospital website.

“For respiratory illness, you should take your baby or young child to an emergency department if they have trouble breathing, significant problems with breathing or lips that look blue, and if your baby can’t suck or drink or feed very well,” she said, adding infants younger than three months with a fever should also be brought in to the ER.

Doctors and health experts are recommending that children six months and older get a flu vaccine this year, especially because of the potential for reduced immunity.

“Last year, the rates for RSV infection were very low or basically non-existent so we have a whole year’s worth of children who did not get those viruses so their natural immunity is potentially lower,” she said.

ticrawford@postmedia.com


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OPEC+ sticks with current oil production plan, despite Omicron – Aljazeera.com

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OPEC+ is sticking with its current plan to adjust crude output by an additional 400,000 barrels a day in January.

OPEC+ is sticking with its plan to keep slowing raising oil output, despite the threat the new Omicron variant of the coronavirus could pose to global crude demand.

OPEC+ – a grouping of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), led by Saudi Arabia, and its allies led by Russia – made the decision at the conclusion of its meeting on Thursday to stick with its current plan to adjust crude output by an additional 400,000 barrels a day in January.

The group has been incrementally opening its taps since August as it continues to unwind the deep production cuts it agreed to back in 2020, when oil prices crashed in the opening months of the pandemic.

Thursday’s decision to hold the line on its current output plan comes at a time of heightened concerns in global oil markets.

Benchmark oil prices have fallen more than $12 since the World Health Organization declared Omicron a “variant of concern” last week, triggering fresh travel restrictions – which could dent crude demand – as well as fuelling concerns over how effective current COVID-19 vaccines may be against the new strain.

Oil prices kept slipping following the news of Thursday’s OPEC+ decision. At 10:26am ET (15:26 GMT) in New York trading, global benchmark Brent crude was down 60 cents to $68.27 a barrel, while United States benchmark West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude was down 66 cents at $64.91 cents a barrel, according to Bloomberg data.

Last Thursday, Brent crude was trading upward of $82 a barrel, while WTI was north of $77 a barrel.

Global oil markets have been whipsawed in recent weeks. An energy crunch that swept the globe in October saw prices rise sharply, prompting calls from US President Joe Biden for OPEC and its allies to boost output and help cool the market.

OPEC+ resisted those calls, leading the US and other nations to tap their strategic oil reserves to help alleviate global price pressures.

But the unpredictable path of the pandemic has flexed its muscle over global energy markets once again with the emergence of the Omicron variant.

“The Omicron variant has sobered up markets during the last few days, halting the oil demand recovery enthusiasm and sending traders scrambling to limit risk in their portfolios,” analysts at Rystad Energy wrote in a note to clients on Thursday.

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Oil Prices Bounce Back Despite The OPEC Decision – OilPrice.com

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Oil Prices Bounce Back Despite The OPEC+ Decision | OilPrice.com


Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana is a writer for Oilprice.com with over a decade of experience writing for news outlets such as iNVEZZ and SeeNews. 

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Oil prices rose on Thursday after OPEC+ decided to keep its oil production policy unchanged and add another 400,000 bpd on the market in January.

As of 10:14 a.m. EST, post OPEC+ meet, WTI Crude was up 1.46% at $66.53 and Brent Crude had increased 1.35% at $69.80. Both benchmarks erased the losses of 3% right after first news reports suggested the monthly increase was on for January.

OPEC+ is sticking to its production plan to add 400,000 barrels per day (bpd) to its production in January, OPEC said in a statement on Thursday, noting that the meeting remains in session.  

The group “agree that the meeting shall remain in session pending further developments of the pandemic and continue to monitor the market closely and make immediate adjustments if required,” OPEC said.

The next regularly scheduled meeting of OPEC+ is set for January 4, 2022.

So, the group is now set to add oil on the market in January, although speculation was high in recent days that OPEC+ could opt for a pause in the monthly increases because of the still high uncertainty over the Omicron COVID variant, the SPR releases led by the United States, and the expected worse-than-thought oil surplus early next year.

The leaders of the group, Saudi Arabia and Russia, had already signaled earlier this week that OPEC+ should not jump the gun and freeze the monthly additions to supply because of the Omicron variant, which has spooked the oil market. With still little information on the new variant and whether it escapes vaccine protection, the alliance looks ready to take further action, if necessary, but it is showing it is not over-reacting to Omicron as many analysts said the market has done.

Initial reactions to the rollover of the production policy suggest that OPEC+ could also believe that global demand will remain resilient during the winter season, and sends a message to the market present in almost every press release: stability.

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

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Months after massive IPO, China's Didi moves to delist from NYSE – MarketWatch

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Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi Global Inc. said late Thursday it plans to delist from the New York Stock Exchange, bowing to pressure from the Chinese government.

“After careful study, the company will start delisting on the New York Stock Exchange immediately, and start preparations for listing in Hong Kong,” Didi said in a post on its Weibo account.

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