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B.C. judge orders vaccinations for 2 boys over their mother's objections – CBC.ca

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A B.C. judge has ordered the vaccination of two children over the objections of their mother, who questioned the safety of immunization.

The case went to provincial court in Salmon Arm, in B.C.’s southern interior, because of the father’s concerns about recent measles outbreaks and a warning that education officials might not allow his two sons to attend school during an outbreak unless they were immunized.

The mother attempted to introduce a report into evidence written by a U.S. doctor who testified in the high-profile case of a Michigan mother who fought for years to keep from vaccinating her young daughter. 

But Judge Stella Frame questioned Dr. Toni Lynn Bark’s qualifications to speak about immunology, virology or epidemiology as well as her claims to be an expert in “vaccine adversomics.”

“It is difficult to know whether or not this is junk science or a recognized emerging field,” Frame wrote in her eight-page decision.

“Presented as it is in her report, her theory or opinion sounds like a conspiracy theory.”

‘Vaccination is preferable to non-vaccination’

The ruling highlights the role of the courts in adjudicating splits between parents divided over vaccination.

Frame’s decision refers to an earlier B.C. Supreme Court decision in which a judge rejected attempts to link vaccines to autism. Frame said she had reached the same conclusion.

“The current best evidence is that vaccination is preferable to non-vaccination, that it is required in order to protect those who cannot be vaccinated as well as to protect ourselves, and that any adverse reaction the person may have from the vaccine is largely outweighed by the risk of contracting the targeted disease,” Frame wrote.

The boys’ mother said she was not a ‘fan’ of the influenza vaccine and worried about adverse reactions to other immunizations. (Robert Short/CBC)

The parents at the heart of the case are referred to by their initials in the ruling, which comes after an application from the father — DRB.

DRB and DAT have two boys from a five-year relationship that began in 2012. Both children are healthy, have no immunity problems and no ailments that would make them ineligible for live vaccines.

But DAT has refused to consent to vaccination or X-rays done at the dentist’s office.

According to the ruling, her opposition to X-rays led to one child needing a root canal, a filling and teeth removed.

“DRB said that multiple dentists at the dentist office had recommended that they do those X-rays,” the ruling says.

‘That is simply not the case’

DAT claimed she worked at a health centre and “was having discussions with various people about what was happening around these flu vaccines.”

She said she had gone to see a naturopath who spoke about adverse reactions. DAT decided she wanted the boys tested for a gene variant as well as allergies and food sensitivities before being vaccinated.

DRB was opposed to paying for testing that he felt was unnecessary.

Dr. Toni Lynn Bark of Illinois has testified in other cases in support of parents opposed to vaccination. But a B.C. provincial court judge questioned her expertise. (YouTube)

The report from Bark was actually written for another child, but the mother offered it to DAT to help her argue her case.

Bark, an Illinois doctor, has spoken frequently in opposition to vaccines and testified as a witness in support of Lori Matheson, a Detroit mother who made headlines in the U.S. fighting vaccination.

Although the judge in that case allowed Bark to testify about her own practice, she refused to qualify Bark as an expert witness on vaccinations, reaching a similar conclusion to Frame about Bark’s claims and credentials.

“One of the diseases that she claimed is very low risk to contract is measles,” Frame wrote.

“That is simply not the case. She also identifies tuberculosis, which is also not eradicated in some parts of Canadian communities. She believes these vaccinations are unnecessary because the identified or targeted diseases have essentially disappeared from developed countries.”

‘The responsibility of the parents’

For his part, DRB introduced two binding B.C. Supreme Court decisions in which judges concluded that the benefits of vaccination outweighed the risks of not being immunized, along with excerpts from reports about the value of immunization from a series of medical and research organizations.

Frame noted that not everyone is recommended for immunization, but the two boys did not fall into that category.

“That does not mean to say that parents should blindly follow whatever medical advice they are given. Errors — sometimes catastrophic ones — can be made by the pharmaceutical and medical industries,” the judge wrote.

“It remains the responsibility of the parents to hear the advice, ask the questions, do the research and reach the appropriate decision for their children.”

Frame decided that DRB should have sole responsibility for the medical and dental treatments for both boys and that they should be immunized according to Immunization B.C.’s immunization schedule.

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Ontario is in a COVID-19 second wave: Ford – Cambridge Times

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Of Monday’s cases, 344 were reported in Toronto, 104 cases in Peel Region, 89 in Ottawa and 56 in York Region.

The latest figures prompted Ontario’s hospitals to call on the government to reinstate restrictions in those regions.

The Ontario Hospital Association said the Greater Toronto Area and Ottawa should move back to Stage Two of the province’s pandemic response, which saw restrictions on non-essential businesses like restaurants, gyms, and movie theatres.


Association President Anthony Dale said hospitals could become overwhelmed with patients if such action isn’t taken.

“We can no longer retain a false sense of security and belief that this will not happen to us,” he said in a statement. “At this rate, Ontario hospitals are facing a direct threat to their ability to continue to delivering the highest quality of care to Ontarians.”

The average acute care occupancy rate of Ontario’s hospitals is 89 per cent currently, Dale said, but some of the facilities are already at 100 per cent capacity.

Health Minister Christine Elliott said the province would prefer to not reinstate any Stage Two restrictions but is watching the situation in the GTA and Ottawa closely.

“If we have to tighten up even more we will … because it’s absolutely necessary to protect the health and safety of everyone in Ontario,” she said.

The government said Monday that 128 people are currently hospitalized in Ontario due to COVID-19, including 29 in intensive care.

NDP Leader Andrea Horwath urged the government to make investments needed to get ahead of the second wave.

“We shouldn’t need to slide back into Stage Two,” she said. “But this government is currently doing nothing to prevent that.”

Green party Leader Mike Schreiner asked Ford to outline the metrics that will trigger school closures and a return to Stage Two.

“People need reassurance that the premier is not asleep at the wheel right now, when his actions will determine the severity of the second wave,” he said in a statement.

Meanwhile, Toronto’s medical officer of health said Monday that she is recommending residents limit contact with those they don’t live with.

She said the concept of having 10 people within your social circle, introduced by the province this spring, was sensible at the time but that has now changed since schools and businesses have reopened and case counts are up.

“In Toronto, we have to acknowledge that the extent of infection spread, and the nature of city life, means that the concept of … the social circle no longer reflects the circumstances in which we live,” she said.

De Villa is also recommending changes that would reduce the number of people permitted in bars and restaurants to a maximum of 75 patrons, down from 100. The number of people permitted at a table would also be lowered from 10 to six people.

She is also recommending bars and restaurants collect contact information from every patron and that music be no louder than normal conversation in the establishment.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 28, 2020.

By Shawn Jeffords, The Canadian Press

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COVID-19 outbreak declared at Lester B. Pearson high school – Newstalk 1010 (iHeartRadio)

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A COVID-19 outbreak has been declared at a ninth school in Ottawa.

Officials have declared an outbreak at Lester B. Pearson Catholic High School in Gloucester, with two cases at the school.

There is conflicting information about the nature of the cases. Ottawa Public Health says one student and one staff member tested positive. The Ottawa Catholic School Board is reporting two student cases and zero staff cases.

The board says four classes have been closed as a result of the outbreak.

Ottawa Public Health defines an outbreak in a school as two COVID-19 cases with a proven link between them.

The school is the ninth in Ottawa to have an outbreak since classes resumed. Only one—Monsignor Paul Baxter school in Barrhaven—has been forced to close entirely for at least two weeks.

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Hospitals call for new COVID-19 restrictions – Cambridge Times

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TORONTO — Ontario’s premier says the province is experiencing a second wave of COVID-19 and all options are on the table to combat a surge in cases.

Doug Ford says the 700 new cases reported in Ontario today — the highest recorded daily increase since the start of the pandemic — are very concerning.

He says the second wave has the potential to be worse than the first experienced in the spring.


Ford is urging people to follow public health rules to limit the wave’s severity.

Ontario’s chief medical officer of health says the province must work to flatten the curve of the virus again to allow hospitals to respond without being overwhelmed.

Dr. David Williams says people became too casual as virus numbers had improved in late August and must now be more vigilant.

Ford has also announced an additional $52 million to hire 3,700 more nurses and personal support workers to help address the virus.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 28, 2020.

By Shawn Jeffords, The Canadian Press

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