Connect with us

Art

B.C.'s Bloom the badger dips her paws into art world – CBC.ca

Published

 on



A B.C. badger has dipped her toes into the world of art — quite literally.

Bloom, a 13-year-old female American badger, made her painting debut with the help of staff at Kamloops’ B.C. Wildlife Park, where she has lived since being found as an orphan in 2006.

Animal care manager Tracy Reynolds said keepers regularly encourage their animals to paint as a way to keep them stimulated and to create bonds with their human caretakers.

“It’s fun for the keepers and it’s fun for the animals,” Reynolds told CBC Daybreak Kamloops host Shelley Joyce.

“We just put the paint on the paper, first, in little blobs, and the keeper encourages Bloom to come up on her lap…. then Bloom comes up and just smears it around with her hands.”

The end result is what Reynolds called a “bold” mixture of reds, greens and yellows, “kind of like a Rorschach.” 

Bloom’s painting framed in recycled wood and glass salvaged from another painting. The starting bid will be $100. (B.C. Wildlife Park)

Reynolds said Bloom was primarily motivated by the food being offered to her while she painted, but thinks she enjoyed the process.

She said feeling the paint is a good sensory experience for the animals.

After consulting with fans on Facebook, the park has decided to auction off the painting to help pay for a new enclosure for another resident: Ranger, a flying squirrel who was found sick and dehydrated in August at an estimated age of four weeks old.

The park hopes to build Ranger a living space that simulates the night during the day and the day during the night so he’ll be active during park visiting hours.

Reynolds isn’t sure how much money Bloom’s painting will raise but hopes it attracts interest from animal and art lovers alike.

“I think it’s a pretty neat conversation piece,” she said.

Subscribe to CBC Kamloops on CBC Listen and connect on FacebookTwitter and Instagram

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Epilepsy education centre in Abbotsford holds online art classes – Abbotsford News

Published

 on


The Center for Epilepsy and Seizure Education in Abbotsford is hosting monthly virtual art classes for people across B.C. living with epilepsy.

The next class is scheduled for Oct. 22 on Facebook Live.

The aim is to improve communication and concentration, reduce feelings of isolation, and increase self-esteem and confidence.

The charity has received a $4,500 donation from the Pacific Blue Cross Health Foundation to support the organization as it continues to provide services to B.C.-based children, youth, individuals and families.

RELATED: B.C. epilepsy patient ends sit-in, awaits answers

The Center for Epilepsy and Seizure Education was incorporated in 1998 as a not-for-profit organization.

Since then, it has pioneered landmark education programs that have been adapted provincially, nationally and internationally.

They provide direct support to families and individuals struggling with seizures; create children’s education and materials and comfort items; send children to summer camp; and promote research.

The centre is located at 32868 Ventura Ave. Visit esebc.org for more information or to register for the next art class.

RELATED: Purple Day 2020: Epilepsy awareness heads online

Arts and culture

Get local stories you won’t find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Windsor is known for many things, but street art isn't one — Derkz is on a mission to change that – CBC.ca

Published

 on



The city of Windsor, Ont, is in many ways defined by its manufacturing heritage, its leadership in the automotive industry and its proximity to its U.S. neighbour Detroit. One thing it is not known for is its street art — but a number of local graffiti artists are hoping to change that.

Windsor-based artist David “Derkz” Derkatz is a graffiti writer and muralist. His work is all over the city, immortalizing everything from civil rights heroes, pop icons and animals to his most recent piece, which is one of Canada’s largest murals celebrating frontline workers.

In this doc by filmmaker Sasha Jordan Appler, Derkz is tasked with painting a wall on an abandoned building to revitalize a forgotten part of the city.

“The west end’s known for being a little bit more gritty, like a little bit of the rougher part, so they wanted something bold and tough,” says Derkz. “I came up with the two-hawk designs.”

Graffiti can completely change a community. Once criticized as vandalism, it is now in contemporary terms an alternative to traditional gallery space, showcasing work outside and defining — or sometimes redefining — a neighbourhood’s character. These colourful large-scale works, like Derkz’s hawk design, create a reason for people to flock to the area and make it feel more welcoming.

Mural artist Derkz in his studio. (CBC Arts)

Watch as Windsor gets transformed by Derkz and fellow graffiti artists Eugenio “Drevmz” Mendoza, Daniel “Denial” Bombardier and Briana “Athena” Benore in the premiere of “Graffiti: The Art that Changes a City” on CBC’s Absolutely Canadian series on CBC TV in Windsor and online on CBC Gem, Oct. 31 at 8 p.m. and Nov. 14 at 7 p.m.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Heffel art auction shifts to a 'digital sale room' – Vancouver Sun

Published

 on


Article content continued

Former Vancouver Art Gallery curator Ian Thom wrote the catalogue entry for the painting, and said meeting Stern was “a turning point in Hughes’s life, because Stern agreed to take on Hughes’s work at his gallery.

“More importantly for the financially struggling artist, Stern agreed to buy the paintings outright, thus assuring Hughes of an income.”

The painting itself is a classic Hughes coastal scene — a Canadian Pacific steamship billowing dark smoke out its funnels as it pulls into the dock, with smaller boats, a lighthouse and islands looming in the background.

The dark blue of the water is reminiscent of the water in Fish Boat, Rivers Inlet, a 1946 Hughes painting that sold for a record $2.04 million in 2018. Three Tugboats, Nanaimo Harbour is no less charming, but has lighter colours, more in keeping with his popular coastal scenes in the 1950s and ‘60s.

The 1952 E.J. Hughes painting Three Tugboats, Nanaimo Harbour has a presale estimate of $200,000 to $300,000. Photo by Ward Bastian /PNG

Heffel is also very high on Green and Gold, Portrait of Vera, a striking 1933-34 Frederick Horsman Varley painting of his most well-known muse, artist Vera Weatherbie. It’s estimated at $500,000 to $700,000.

The fall sale is the 25th anniversary of the first Heffel auction.

“Our first live sale was at the Wall Centre in November, 1995,” Heffel recalls. “We had a fabulous Alex Colville, Dog and Groom, on the cover (of the catalogue). In fact we often say that was the sale we had the most fun at, because we were just rookies out of the box.”

The Heffel brothers had taken over the Heffel gallery at 2247 Granville after its founder, their father Ken, died of a heart attack on Oct. 13, 1987. He was only 53.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending