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B.C. surpasses 20000 cases in 'perhaps the most challenging time of this pandemic:' Henry – Times Colonist

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B.C. continues to see record-high COVID-19 case counts, with 1,130 new cases reported over two days — including another 16 in the Island Health region.

That put the province over the 20,000-case threshold, with daily new case counts doubling every 13 days, provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said Thursday, as she presented the latest computer modelling of infection growth.

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“We are in a challenging time, perhaps the most challenging time of this pandemic,” Henry said.

The rapid increase in cases since the Thanksgiving weekend, particularly in the Lower Mainland, is “stretching our ability to cope from a public health perspective,” and putting pressure on contact tracers, she said.

There were 536 new cases reported Tuesday to Wednesday, and 594 cases Wednesday to Thursday, for a total of 5,793 active cases in the province. A total of 155 people are in hospital with COVID-19, including 44 in intensive or critical care. There were four new deaths, three of which were in long-term care. Another 11,091 people are being monitored for the virus.

Henry said one infection can have widespread impact, pointing to a small wedding where 15 people became positive; 10 of those had additional household cases and one person spread it to a long-term care home, where three people were hospitalized and one died.

She said health officials are learning the virus is easier to transmit in cooler weather, especially while people are inside, which is why it’s so important for people to reduce their contacts and step up their safety measures.

In the Fraser and Vancouver Coastal health regions, only essential travel is permitted in and out.

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix said this is not the time to take chances. “If you’re unsure about something, this is the time not to do it.”

The majority of new cases over the past two days are in the Lower Mainland: 808 in Fraser Health and 249 in Vancouver Coastal, along with 34 in Interior Health and 23 in Northern Health.

There are now 51 active cases in Island Health — 23 in the south, 17 in the central area and 11 in the north.

There are also 41 outbreaks in health-care facilities across the province, six of which are in acute-care hospitals, including Nanaimo Regional General Hospital, where five staff members tested positive.

Dr. Ben Williams, Island Health’s chief medical executive, said Thursday that four of the staff members who tested positive were on the transitional care unit, which looks after patients with complex medical needs who no longer require acute care, and one was from another part of the hospital.

The unit has been closed to admissions and visitors and is receiving enhanced cleaning. All patients on the unit are being tested for COVID-19.

Apart from the five confirmed cases, Williams said 34 patients and 25 staff at the hospital have been tested so far, and none have tested positive.

He said all other areas of the hospital, wards, diagnostics and emergency department “are open for business.”

One hopeful note for the province is that there have been “very few” transmissions in schools, Henry said. Despite 261 exposures, there have been fewer than a dozen incidents in B.C. where transmission has occurred in a school setting.

Because of the increasing number of cases, Vancouver Coastal and Fraser health regions are under orders mandating no social gatherings of any size and suspending all travel for sports for two weeks.

Indoor group physical activities in the regions are suspended and workplaces have been asked to encourage staff to work from home.

The measures are in effect until Nov. 23.

The goal is not to bring cases down to zero, said Henry, but to get back to a “reasonable” number of cases, so social interactions can be restarted in a safe and measured way.

There’s not going to be a vaccine that will save the day by Christmas or “make all this go away,” said Henry, who encouraged British Columbians to find safe ways to celebrate until there is a vaccine in the new year.

ceharnett@timescolonist.com

— With a file from the Canadian Press

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COVID-19 update for Nov. 24: Teachers' union asks parents to encourage students to wear masks – Standard Freeholder

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The latest case numbers, exposure alerts and guidelines: Here’s your daily update with everything you need to know about COVID-19 in B.C.

Here’s your daily update with everything you need to know on the novel coronavirus situation in B.C. for Nov. 24, 2020.

We’ll provide summaries of what’s going on in B.C. right here so you can get the latest news at a glance. This page will be updated regularly throughout the day, with developments added as they happen.

Check back here for more updates throughout the day. You can also get the latest COVID-19 news delivered to your inbox weeknights at 7 p.m. by subscribing to our newsletter here.


B.C.’S COVID-19 CASE NUMBERS

As of the latest figures given on Nov. 23:
• Total number of confirmed cases: 27,407 (10,200 active)
• New cases since Nov. 20: 1,933
• Hospitalized cases: 277
• Intensive care: 59
• COVID-19 related deaths: 348 (17 new)
• Cases under public health monitoring: 10,200
• Recovered: 19,069
• Long-term care and assisted-living homes, and acute care facilities currently affected: 66

IN-DEPTH: COVID-19: Here are all the B.C. cases of the novel coronavirus


LATEST NEWS on COVID-19 in B.C.

3 p.m. – Health officials are set to share latest figures on COVID-19 in B.C.

Health officials are expected to update the number of COVID-19 cases, deaths and recoveries across the province.

1:45 p.m. – Lack of Canadian vaccine production means others could get inoculations first: PM

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sought to reassure Canadians on Tuesday that COVID-19 vaccines will start to arrive in the coming months even as he acknowledged that other nations are likely to start inoculating their citizens first.

“One of the things to remember is Canada no longer has any domestic production capacity for vaccines,” Trudeau said during his regular COVID-19 news conference outside his home in Ottawa.

“We used to have it decades ago, but we no longer have it. Countries like the United States, Germany and the U.K. do have domestic pharmaceutical facilities, which is why they’re obviously going to prioritize helping their citizens first.”

At the same time, Trudeau underscored the importance of getting inoculations to Canadians.

“We know we’re not going to get through this pandemic without a vaccine,” he said.

1 p.m. – Teachers union asks parents to encourage students to wear masks

The president of the B.C. Teachers Federation has written an open letter to parents, asking them to encourage their children to wear masks in school.

Although masks are not mandatory in school, Terri Mooring says the BCTF wants parents to help “support a culture of mask wearing.”

“The school community has come together and made mask wearing normal and expected. It really helps everyone in our schools feel safer. We need to be doing all we can to ensure we keep each other safe. No one wants to bring COVID-19 home to their families,” said Mooring, who conceded that there are some staff and students who, for various reasons, can’t wear masks and some learning situations where masks are inappropriate.

“By talking to your children about wearing their masks in school, you can help us create that respectful culture of mask wearing.”

11:30 a.m. – Federal government buys drug developed in Vancouver to treat COVID-19 patients

The federal government has agreed to buy an antibody drug developed by a Vancouver company to treat COVID-19 patients.

The use of bamlanivimab, developed by Vancouver’s AbCellera Biologics in partnership with U.S. pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly, was approved by Health Canada earlier this week.

The government will buy 26,000 doses of the drug over a three-month period from December to February for $32.5 million US, according to a news release from Eli Lilly Tuesday.

The company says additional doses will be supplied to Canada on a monthly basis according to the country’s medical need.

Bamlanivimab is designed to block viral attachment and entry into human cells, neutralizing the virus and potentially treating COVID-19, according to the company.

AbCellera founder and chief executive Carl Hansen said Health Canada had granted authorization for the use of bamlanivimab to treat people over the age of 12 with mild and moderate COVID-19 symptoms who were at high risk of the disease progressing.

11 a.m. – McDonald’s in Coquitlam reopens

A McDonald’s restaurant in Coquitlam, which closed Monday after an employee tested positive for the COVID-19 virus, has reopened.

McDonald’s says it learned an employee from the 2725 Barnet Highway location had COVID-19 on Monday.

“Out of an abundance of caution, the decision was made to shut down the restaurants for a thorough cleaning and sanitization by a certified third party,” McDonald’s said, in a news release Tuesday.

McDonald’s says all staff who may have been in close contact with the employee have been asked to self-isolate.

A Vancouver McDonlad’s located at 3695 Lougheed Highway closed late last month after a staffer tested positive for the virus. That restaurant has also since reopened.

6 a.m. – With the pandemic keeping people home for the holidays, more residents turning to elaborate lighting displays: report

With the gloom of the COVID-19 pandemic hanging over the holidays this year, it seems more British Columbians are turning to elaborate lights and displays to lift their spirits.

A BC Hydro report Tuesday titled “Home for the holidays: British Columbians are brightening up the holidays with bigger, more elaborate lighting displays,” finds 90 per cent of British Columbians say they are planning more elaborate lighting displays at home.

The survey found about 20 per cent of respondents are planning to add more indoor and outdoor decorations.

And, in a nod to the classic film National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation starring Chevy Chase, BC Hydro says there are expected to be more ‘Clark Griswold-style’ mega displays than in other years. The poll found nearly 10 per cent they are going to put up more than 10 strands of lights.

BC Hydro data shows these elaborate displays account for about three per cent of provincial electricity use, but that number is expected to rise this year.

Some of the poll’s other findings include about 22 per cent plan to put up eight strands of lights on average, up nearly 10 per cent since 2018, according to BC Hydro.

Fifteen per cent of holiday decorators plan to put up three or more displays, while about five per cent plan to put up between six and 15.

BC Hydro says there are concerns for energy use during this time, especially since 25 per cent say they still use some incandescent lights to decorate. The older bulbs are up to 90 per cent less energy efficient than LEDs, according to BC Hydro.

5 a.m. – Poll finds many Canadians gaining weight during pandemic

A new poll suggests many Canadians are gaining weight because they’re eating more and exercising less during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Nearly one-third of respondents in the survey conducted by Leger and the Association for Canadian Studies said they have put on weight since March, compared to 15 per cent who said they lost
weight over that time.

As well, about one-third of respondents said they’re exercising less, while 16 per cent said they’re working out more since the first wave of the pandemic landed in Canada in the spring.

Jack Jedwab, president of the Association for Canadian Studies, suggested that one reason may be a rush for comfort food to deal with pandemic-related anxieties.

Respondents in the survey who said they were “very afraid” of COVID-19 were more likely to report gaining weight, eating more and exercising less.

The online survey of 1,516 Canadians was conducted Oct. 29-31 and cannot be assigned a margin of error because internet-based polls are not considered random samples.

Dr. Yoni Freedhoff, an associate professor of family medicine at the University of Ottawa, said there are plausible reasons to connect weight gain or loss with the pandemic, but he hadn’t seen any studies to convince him that’s the case.

Jedwab said the country needs to also be mindful of mental health issues that can affect the physical health of Canadians.

“With the winter coming, it’ll be even more challenging, in some parts of the country, to maintain a healthy lifestyle in terms of walking, in terms of doing basic things that will help us address our anxieties,” he said, pointing to lack of access for some to gyms subject to local lockdowns.

-The Canadian Press

12 a.m. – 1,933 new cases, 17 additional deaths

B.C. health officials reported Monday that 1,933 more people had tested positive for COVID-19 in the province over the weekend.

Dr. Bonnie Henry, the provincial health officer, also reported that 17 more people had died from the respiratory disease between Friday and Monday. A total of 348 people have died from COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic.

12 a.m. – Potential exposures at The Morrissey in Vancouver

Vancouver Coastal Health has updated its public exposures page with potential COVID-19 exposures at The Morrissey pub (1127 Granville Street) in downtown Vancouver. The potential exposures occurred on November 12-13, from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. on both nights.

The exposures are being described as low risk, but patrons of the pub on both nights are being asked to self-monitor for symptoms.


B.C. GUIDES AND LINKS

COVID-19: Here’s everything you need to know about the novel coronavirus

COVID-19: Have you been exposed? Here are all B.C. public health alerts

COVID-19 at B.C. schools: Here are the school district exposure alerts

COVID-19: Avoid these hand sanitizers that are recalled in Canada

COVID-19: Here’s where to get tested in Metro Vancouver

B.C. COVID-19 Symptom Self-Assessment Tool



LOCAL RESOURCES for COVID-19 information

Here are a number of information and landing pages for COVID-19 from various health and government agencies.

B.C. COVID-19 Symptom Self-Assessment Tool

Vancouver Coastal Health – Information on Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

HealthLink B.C. – Coronavirus (COVID-19) information page

B.C. Centre for Disease Control – Novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

Government of Canada – Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Outbreak update

World Health Organization – Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak

–with files from The Canadian Press

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N.B. COVID-19 roundup: Some classes go online, testing sites boosted as five new cases reported – CBC.ca

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Dr. Jennifer Russell, the chief medical officer of health, directly addressed the youth of New Brunswick at Tuesday’s news conference, urging them to do what they can do to reverse the trend of COVID-19.

“New Brunswickers under the age of 30 are contracting COVID-19 in growing numbers and passing it to others,” Russell said. “Children, teens and young adults are not immune to this disease,” and can pass it on to others who are more vulnerable.

Russell urged them to wear a mask in public, maintain physical distancing. “You can help return all zones to the yellow phase,” she said. 

Russell also announced five new cases on Tuesday, although Public Health originally reported six.

Three of the new cases are in the Saint John region (Zone 2), and include:

  • two people 19 and under; and
  • one individual 30 to 39.

Two cases are in the Moncton region (Zone 1), both cases are individuals age 20 to 29.

There are now 93 active cases in the province, with no one in hospital with the disease.

“There will be more cases,” Russell warned. “A record number of people across the province self-isolating … and the risk that our hospitals will be overwhelmed is high.”

Education Minister Dominic Cardy said classes at four schools in the Saint John and Moncton region will go online for two weeks next week. (File photo submitted by New Brunswick government)

Education Minister Dominic Cardy also spoke at the briefing.

Cardy said there are now seven schools in the Saint John and Fredericton regions that have been impacted and he understands parents are concerned, “but we have reason to be optimistic.” 

He said the province has learned from the earlier outbreak in the Campbellton region. 

“In the summer I was clear,” he said. “I said there would be more cases, and more deaths. This is not a surprise.”

He said officials took the summer to develop a plan, and thanks to the work of contact tracers across the province, and residents, New Brunswick was able to push COVID-19 back.

But Cardy noted a handful of classes in Zone 2 and 3 will be learning from home “in the coming week or two,” including Hampton Middle School and Lakefield Elementary School in Zone 2, and Centreville school and Montgomery school in Zone 3.

There will be remote IT services to assist parents if there are technical issues, said Cardy, who provided this number: 1-833-453-1140. 

Lakefield Elementary School in Quispamsis has confirmed its first case of COVID-19. (Candace Patterson)

Quispamsis school reports case of COVID-19

An elementary school in the Quispamsis area is the latest New Brunswick school to report a case of COVID-19.  

An email was sent out to parents at Lakefield Elementary School on Monday.

This brings the total number of confirmed COVID-19 cases at New Brunswick schools to six since last week, and 11 since the school year began.

The email to Lakefield parents says the kindergarten to Grade 5 school is working with Public Health to identify students and school personnel who might have come into contact with the coronavirus.

“Public health officials will contact you if your child has been in close contact with the confirmed case and will tell you if your child needs to self-isolate,” the email said. 

“If you are not contacted by Public Health officials, your child can continue to attend school.”

LISTEN | Education Minister Dominic Cardy talks about how he’s prepared to switch system to online learning at a moment’s notice

Information Morning – Fredericton14:42Covid-19 exposures in schools

Education Minister Dominic Cardy joined us to talk about going to school in the orange phase, and the COVID-19 cases and exposures in our schools. 14:42

The email went on to say that further details will not be released, in order to protect the confidentiality of students and employees.

Education Minister Dominic Cardy said Monday that schools will move to online learning right away if there are any risks to students or if the number of cases increases. 

How much is too much information in a pandemic?

There’s a fine balance between saying too much and not enough during a public health crisis, an associate professor of public policy at the University of British Columbia says.

“Feeling the information is consistent and trustworthy will really help with compliance, so it’s completely crucial,” said Heidi Tworek, who is also the co-author of Democratic Health Communications during COVID-19: A Rapid Response, which has been featured in the New York Times, Financial Times, CNN and elsewhere.

Tworek spoke to Information Morning Fredericton on Tuesday. 

When a crisis emerges, she said people tend to have a lot of anxiety and want as much information as possible.

“At the same time, we have to recognize there is a limit to information authorities may be able reveal,” she said.

New Brunswick Public Health has been cautious about how much information it makes available to the public, withholding all details except the health zones where cases have turned up, the ages of the people who tested positive, and whether their cases are travel-related or under investigation.

Although some of her counterparts have used data to show how the disease has spread through a particular area, Dr. Jennifer Russell, New Brunswick’s chief medical officer of health, has said she will share only what she’s decided the public needs to hear.

Heidi Tworek, an assistant professor in international history and public policy at University of British Columbia, says governments and public health agencies have to be more effective at communicating to the public because disinformation will spread faster than facts. (Glen Kugelstadt/CBC)

There are seven zones in New Brunswick. 

However, Zone 3, the Fredericton and River Valley area and the largest zone in the province, contains more than 20 communities.

Tworek said that if New Brunswick Public Health got too specific about where cases are, people in other areas might let their guards down, causing the virus to spread.

“We need to figure out the balance how specific to get … while at the same time trying not to reveal so much, for example, we’re stigmatizing certain people,” she said, citing what happened during the early years of AIDS and HIV which caused some stigmatization around gay people.  

Russell has also avoided answering questions on other issues related to COVID-19 during the COVID news conferences that have happened on and off since the outbreak started in March.

But there isn’t a magic formula, Tworek said.

She said countries around the world have taken different approaches to releasing public health information, partly because they have different laws about privacy, she said. 

Some countries are also more transparent. When the respiratory virus first broke out, authorities in Taiwan made a point of being transparent with the public, telling the public it didn’t have enough masks to go around and those that were available were needed for health-care workers. 

Vehicles lined up to get back into New Brunswick from Prince Edward Island when the Atlantic bubble was still intact this past summer. (Elizabeth Fraser/CBC News)

However, countries like Canada have different degrees of disclosure depending on where a person lives. And some members of the public might have more trust in public health authorities than others. 

She said the most important objective is for public health officials to build trust with the people they’re communicating with. And they can do this by explaining how and why they’re making certain decisions.

“It’s a very tricky balance.” 

Saint John mayor asks public to stay calm

Saint John Mayor Don Darling says he’s never been happier to have the flu.

Darling received a negative COVID test result Monday. But it’s been a roller-coaster experience.

“I am following the rules.,” he told Information Morning Saint John on Tuesday. “I’m masked and I’ve never washed my hands more in my life. 

“There’s a fear, there’s a shame. I didn’t know if folks were going to show up with tiki torches outside my home.”

He has been self-isolating since Friday after experiencing several COVID symptoms, including aches, trouble breathing, a cough and fever. 

The Saint John region was recently sent back to the orange phase because of the recent spike in cases.

There are currently 43 active COVID cases in the Saint John region

Darling is reminding residents to stay patient and calm. 

“We’ve seen it in our community, folks speculating and hunting down those that have COVID,” he said. “Those that have COVID are human beings.”

The hospitality industry has been “barely hanging on,” throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the vice- president of Restaurants Canada in Atlantic Canada says. 

Bars, restaurants should be shut down, Saint John bartender says 

A Saint John bartender says the government should temporarily shut down bars and restaurants in order to control the local COVID-19 outbreak.

Liv Wagg, 26, has been off work and self-isolating since last Thursday, after a possible COVID exposure notice at her workplace.

It’s been a stressful week, said Wagg, and every bartender she knows is on edge.

Wagg said she normally enjoys going to work and she thinks it’s nice for people to be able to socialize in bars, but she doesn’t agree bars should be open right now.

“I don’t think they should be,” she said. “I think we should be seeing a little bit more leadership from the government.”

Wagg said bar owners are taking precautions and following the rules, but a closure order would be a more clearcut way to reduce the spread. 

Bar and restaurant staff have felt “weird” about working since the mandatory mask order came into effect, she said.

That’s partly because it’s hard to get patrons to follow the rules, said Wagg.

Customers often absent-mindedly pull down their masks to talk to her. And she has to remind them to put them back on.

“People forget and they’re like, ‘Oh, I can’t talk with this thing in my mouth.'”

Premier Blaine Higgs announced Monday that New Brunswick will not be making changes to the Atlantic bubble, despite Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador temporarily pulling out. 1:45

It happens so often, she said, it’s “almost comical,” except for the threat it currently presents to public health.

It puts bartenders in a difficult position, said Wagg, to expect them to catch and confront people who put fake names down for contract tracing or come in with people who are not members of their bubble, as the premier said during Monday’s news conference.

“I feel like it’s going to be really, really difficult to execute,” said Wagg.

When the bar is busy, she said, there isn’t time to double check names.

Dr. Jennifer Russell, New Brunswick’s chief medical officer of health, says there hasn’t been evidence of community spread in the province, but there are still 13 active COVID-19 cases under investigation. 1:22

And often young bar patrons will have IDs that show their parents’ address, not their student accommodations. 

Wagg would also like to see the government make COVID testing more available to bar and restaurant staff. Nova Scotia has just done that. And it’s been recommended by epidemiologist Colin Furness based on what’s been learned from the way the disease has spread in Ontario. Chief medical officer Dr. Jennifer Russell said Monday that she’d consider it.

“I think that’s a really good idea,” Wagg said. “Anyone working in customer service really should be able to have more access to testing right now.”

Wagg said she hasn’t even tried to get a COVID test because she’s heard from other bar staff that she won’t get one because she doesn’t have symptoms.

89 active cases of COVID-19

Both Newfoundland and Labrador and P.E.I. announced Monday that they were leaving the Atlantic bubble for at least two weeks as COVID-19 cases rise in parts of the region.

New Brunswick isn’t following suit, although Premier Blaine Higgs is asking people to be cautious about travel outside the province.

New Brunswick Public Health reported 15 new cases on Monday, and one death, a person in their 80s in the Saint John region.

Eleven of the new cases are in the Saint John region (Zone 2), three are in the Moncton region (Zone 1) and one in the Fredericton region (Zone 3), Dr. Jennifer Russell, New Brunswick’s chief medical officer of health, said at Monday’s news conference.

All 15 of the new cases have been “identified and are isolating,” said Dr. Jennifer Russell, New Brunswick’s chief medical officer of health at a news briefing Monday. 

As of Monday, the province had a total of 89 active cases.

Seven people in New Brunswick have died of the disease since the pandemic started.

Moncton and Saint John have both been pushed back to the orange phase of recovery, while the rest of the province has stayed at the less restrictive yellow phase.

Potential public exposure warnings for Saint John, Moncton

New Brunswick Public Health has released the following possible exposure to COVID-19 warnings for locations in Moncton and Saint John, including gyms, stores, bars, restaurants and on flights.

Anyone who visited the following businesses during the identified times should self-monitor for symptoms for 14 days.

Anyone who develops any COVID-19 symptoms should self-isolate and take the self-assessment online to schedule a test.

Saint John area

  • Rothesay Route 1 Big Stop Restaurant on Nov. 14 between 12:45 p.m. and 2 p.m. (2870 Route 1, Rothesay).
     
  • Pub Down Under on Nov. 14, between 8:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. (400 Main St., Saint John)
     
  • Fish & Brew on Nov. 14 between 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. (800 Fairville Blvd., Saint John)
     
  • Cora Breakfast and Lunch on Nov. 16 between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. (39 King St., Saint John).
     
  • Goodlife Fitness McAllister Place on Nov. 16 between noon and 1 p.m. and on Nov. 18 between 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. (519 Westmorland Rd., Saint John).
     
  • NBCC Grandview campus on Nov. 16, 17, and 18 between 8:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. (950 Grandview Ave., Saint John).
     
  • Merle Norman Cosmetic Studio on Nov. 19 between 12:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. (47 Clark Rd., Rothesay)
  • Let’s Hummus at 44 Water St. between 2 a.m. and 3 a.m.

  • Eighty-Three Bar Arcade at 43 Princess St. on Nov. 14 between midnight and 2 a.m.

  • Callie’s Pub at 2 Princess St. on Nov. 14 between midnight and 2 a.m.

  • O’Leary’s Pub at 46 Princess St. on Nov. 14 between midnight and 2 a.m.

  • Five and Dime Bar at 34 Grannan St. on Nov. 14, between 12:30 to 2:30 a.m

  • Freddie’s Pizza at 27 Charlotte St. on Nov. 14, between 2:30 to 3 a.m.

  • Big Tide Brewing Company at 47 Princess St. on Nov. 16, between 12:30 to 2 p.m.

  • Java Moose at 84 Prince William St. Nov. 16, between 2 to 2:30 p.m.

  • Rocky’s Sports Bar at 7 Market Square on Nov. 13, between 10:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Potential public exposure was also reported on Nov. 14 between 10:30 p.m. and 1:30 a.m.

Moncton 

  • RD Maclean Co. Ltd. on Nov. 16, 17 and 18 at 200 St. George St., between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.  
  • GoodLife Fitness on Nov. 21 at 555 Dieppe Blvd, Dieppe, between 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m.  
  • Fit 4 Less at 165 Main St. on Nov. 6-12, at various times between 5 p.m. and midnight. Full list on Public Health website. 

  • GoodLife Fitness at Moncton Junction Village Gym on Nov. 6, between 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Potential public exposure was also reported on Nov. 9, between 8:30 p.m. and 10 p.m.

  • Aldo Shoes at Moncton Champlain Mall on Nov. 6-10 at various times between 9:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
  • CEPS Louis-J. Robichaud fitness room at 40 Antonine-Maillet Ave. on Nov. 6, 9, 10 and 12 at various times in the evening from 5:15 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

  • Tandoori Zaika Cuisine and Bar at 196 Robinson St. on Nov. 8, between 1 a.m. and 2 a.m.

  • Keg Steakhouse and Bar at 576 Main St. on Nov. 17, between 7:45 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.

  • Flights into Moncton:

  • Air Canada Flight 8954 on Nov. 15 from Winnipeg to Toronto, arrived at 8:16 p.m.

  • Air Canada Flight 8918 on Nov. 15 from Toronto to Moncton, arrived at 11:43 p.m.

  • Air Canada Flight 0992 on Nov. 7 from Mexico City to Toronto, arrived at 7:20 p.m.

  • Air Canada Flight 8918 on Nov. 7 from Toronto to Moncton, arrived at 11:43 p.m.

What to do if you have a symptom

People concerned they might have COVID-19 symptoms can take a self-assessment test online

Public Health says symptoms shown by people with COVID-19 have included:

  • A fever above 38 C.

  • A new cough or worsening chronic cough.

  • Sore throat.

  • Runny nose.

  • Headache.

  • New onset of fatigue, muscle pain, diarrhea, loss of sense of taste or smell.

  • Difficulty breathing.

In children, symptoms have also included purple markings on the fingers and toes.

People with one of those symptoms should:

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More COVID-19 deaths in Manitoba linked to hospital and care home outbreaks – CTV News Winnipeg

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WINNIPEG —
The province has reported 12 more Manitobans have died of COVID-19 as of Tuesday, many of which are linked to outbreaks at hospitals and care homes.

For more than a month straight, Dr. Brent Roussin, the chief provincial public health officer, has listed off a growing list of Manitobans who have died of COVID-19 every single day.

Tuesday saw that grim trend continue, as Roussin reported the deaths of 12 more people.

These deaths include:

  • A man in his 60s from the Winnipeg health region and linked to the outbreak at St. Boniface Hospital, Unit E6;
  • A man in his 60s from the Winnipeg health region and linked to the outbreak at Health Science Centre unit A4;
  • A woman in her 60s from the Winnipeg health region and linked to the outbreak at St. Norbert personal care home;
  • A woman in her 60s from the Winnipeg health region;
  • Two men in their 70s from Southern Heath–Santé Sud health region;
  • A woman in her 70s from the Northern health region;
  • A man in his 80s from the Southern Heath–Santé Sud health region and linked to the outbreak at the Villa Youville personal care home;
  • A man in his 80s from the Southern Heath–Santé Sud health region and linked to the outbreak at Oakview Manor;
  • A man in his 80s from the Winnipeg health region and linked to the outbreak at Parkview Place;
  • A man in his 90s from the Prairie Mountain Health region and linked to the outbreak at the Fairview Personal Care Home; and
  • A woman in her 90s from the Southern Heath–Santé Sud health region and linked to the outbreak at the Rest Haven Nursing Home.

Roussin said the province defines COVID-19 deaths as someone who has died and has tested positive for COVID-19 unless health officials can clearly say it was not responsible for the death.

“If COVID-19 was at all related to it, then we would consider that a COVID-related death,” Roussin said.

He said, as an example, if someone died in a car crash and had tested positive for COVID-19 – it would not be counted as a COVID-19 death.

Since March, 248 people have died of COVID-19 in Manitoba.

ACTIVE CASES OF COVID-19 MAY BE LOWER THAN RECOVERIES, ROUSSIN SAYS

These cases bring Manitoba’s total number of cases to 14,558 since March, though the province removed five cases from the total on Tuesday due to a data correction.

The province also reported 280 more people have recovered from COVID-19 as of Tuesday, which brings Manitoba’s total recoveries to 5,633.

The province reported the number of active cases is 8,677, but Roussin said the actual number of active cases might be much lower.

He said if the number excludes those in hospital and accounts for unreported recoveries – which are considered 10 days after symptom onset – then the number of active cases would be 3,363 active cases.

There are now 292 people in hospital due to the virus, including 47 people in intensive care.

MANITOBANS NEED TO BRING THE NUMBERS DOWN, TOP DOCTOR SAYS

“We all know we need to bring these numbers down,” Roussin said, adding the caseloads are straining the health-care system.

“It does require us to limit a lot of things we love to do, but right the message is really clear – we need to stay home as much as possible.”

Roussin said the more people stay home, the fewer contacts each case will have, which will lead to a drop in Manitoba’s surging cases.

He reported 476 new cases of COVID-19, which have pushed Manitoba’s five-day test positivity rate to the highest it has ever been, reaching 14.2 per cent on Tuesday.

The majority of the cases are in the Winnipeg health region, which reported 257 cases of COVID-19 and has a test-positivity rate of 13.9 per cent.

The other cases reported on Tuesday include:

  • 37 cases in the Interlake-Eastern health region;
  • 38 cases in the Northern health region;
  • 33 cases in the Prairie Mountain Health region; and
  • 111 cases in the Southern Health–Santé Sud health region.

This is a developing story. More to come.

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