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BAC virtual art show brings community and artists together – – Brock Press

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On Friday, May 1, the Brock Art Collective (BAC) held its first virtual art show via Lifesize. Community members and students alike tuned in to watch artists present their artwork in a 30-minute video call. 

Stephanie Dancer, the president of the BAC, facilitated the show along with Angelina Turner and Joshua Harwood. Dancer opened the online floor up to artists that otherwise would not have been able to display their pieces.

“We wanted to come together and create this really cool community event. That’s our focus for the year, which is to make our club really inclusive and community-based,” says Dancer. “We thought it was a really great time to open up and do that [promote inclusiveness] virtually, especially because a lot of the graduating students weren’t able to show their work. We wanted to give them a platform to show their work off and tell us a little about what they’ve been working on over the year.”

Although unprecedented, the show ran smoothly. After introductions and some technical instructions, the artists began to share their work. Each participant was allotted two minutes to share a bit about their unique art display. From visual art to a silk-screening demonstration, Adaptations was an eclectic show.

The art show was fittingly named Adaptations to reflect the current state of the world.  “The reason we [BAC] named it Adaptations is because we are in the midst of this unprecedented time where we are all under quarantine and we have to adapt our lives to different situations. We thought the name was really reflective of what was going on in society right now,” says Dancer. 

The BAC is hopeful that Adaptations serves as a foundation for future online art shows. “It is our first show, as much as we have planned this out, we really are doing a test drive for future shows,” says Dancer.

One of the artists in attendance was Aidan Frenette, a third-year student in the Visual Arts program at Brock University. Frenette uses a variety of mediums to create their artwork, from strawberry syrup to cake to canvas and paint;  their art knows no bounds. Even a global pandemic cannot stop them, along with other student artists, from sharing their passion. 

In the virtual art show, Frenette shared a three- by five-foot painting of filmmaker David Lynch. Each inch of Frenette’s painting was divided into nine little squares, which created a pixelated effect. Beyond artistic technique, their pixelation is an ode to Lynch’s work Twin Peaks

“Obscuring the portrait is a reference to his own filmmaking and the minute themes within that filmmaking. On a small scale, if you go into his filmmaking or television series, it won’t make sense if you look at one character,” says Frenette. “You need to really look at the relationship between everything and then you will get the bigger picture, which is like the painting that I’ve done. It won’t make sense if you stand up close, you have to stand about five feet back and then you can actually see what I’m talking about.”

Frenette’s piece was just one of eight that was shown during Adaptations. Each artist took the meaning of Adaptations to heart, resulting in a collection of masterful, unique works. Despite being online, viewers could easily feel the passion radiating from all of the artists involved. 

Alongside Frenette, Lindsay Allen, Jessica Thomas, Kayla Chin-Loy, Lindsay-Anne Chilcott, Lauren Sandal, Josh Arcari and Avrie Coney shared their works. There was plenty of diversity featured in Adaptations. Arcari captivated the audience with his silk-screening demonstration that kicked off the show. Thomas’s abstract piece “Fleshy” was a heartfelt nod to the scrutiny those under quarantine face in regard to their bodies and mental states. 

Each artist articulately shared their works’ meaning to the audience. Participants watched intently and silently clapped to congratulate the artists on their hard work.

Adaptations was a success for the BAC as it brought the community together to enjoy the talent of young artists. The artists displayed their ability to adapt, leaving audience members in awe even from afar. 

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Kootenay Gallery of Art virtual store project well underway – Castlegar News

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The Kootenay Gallery of Art in Castlegar is in the process of creating a new virtual gift store.

Art curator Maggie Shirley said the virtual store is slated to go online in July and will feature up to 300 pottery, jewellery and woodworking items created by West Kootenay artists.

The gallery started the project to help make up for lost revenue since it has been shut down since mid-March due to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis.

The new website will have an accessible layout for everyone, according to Shirley.

“We’ve been categorizing each art piece as we put it onto the virtual store,” said Shirley.

“One category will let customers search for different objects on the site while another category will let people search for individual artists.”

The art gallery is setting up a completely new website for the virtual store and will have debit and credit card payment options. Links will also be put on the art gallery’s existing website and social media pages to direct people to the virtual store.

Shirley said the project has been time consuming, especially since it takes staff up to 30 minutes to photograph, weigh, measure and put each object online.

Customers will either be able to pick up their items at the art gallery or have them delivered or shipped to their door.

While the items will be able to be shipped across Canada and the United States, Shirley said the high shipping costs could deter some customers away.

Despite the difficulties, Shirley said now has never been a better time to launch the store.

“This is a really important transition time for us and a lot of local businesses. We really want to survive these difficult times and grow,” said Shirley.

“This is a big risk were taking, especially since we don’t know if we’re going to get enough traffic to the virtual store to make it worthwhile. However, this is the future of how people will buy things and its a perfect time to get on the bandwagon.”

Shirley hopes that the art gallery will be able to open its physical store again in September.

READ MORE: Kootenay Gallery of Art offers hand-made gifts

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@connortrembley
connor.trembley@castlegarnews.com

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Levi Nelson art on display in downtown Pemberton – Pique Newsmagazine

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Hydro boxes in Pemberton just got a lot more exciting.

Pieces by Levi Nelson, a Lil’wat Nation artist in his last year at Emily Carr University of Art and Design, are now installed on hydro boxes along Portage Road and on the utility box at the Downtown Community Barn.

“We are incredibly grateful and honoured that Levi shared his artwork with us,” the Village of Pemberton said on a Facebook post on Friday, June 5.

Nelson’s work has been exhibited at the Talking Stick Festival, the Museum of Anthropology, North Vancouver City Art Scape, and the Emily Carr University of Art & Design Aboriginal Student Art Show. He also recently became the first Lil’wat Nation artist to have a piece in the Audain Art Museum’s permanent collection.

The recent hydro box wraps were made possible thanks to a contribution from BC Hydro’s beautification fund.

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Applications being accepted for public art funding – paNOW

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Macleod Campbell explained they are also happy to support public art projects as they help to improve the overall quality of life for people in the city.

“It’s nice to have public art for viewing at this time as well as of course supporting the artist,” she said.

Eligible groups can include a range of organizations from local art groups to private businesses. In order to be eligible, the group has to be working with a professional artist and the piece must be displayed publicly.

There is not a hard deadline for people to apply for funding. Macleod Campbell said applications are subject to approval from the art working committee and city council.

Macleod Campbell explained the city is also working to make people aware of the art which is on display in public spaces around the city, as they have created a public art tour brochure. The document is currently available on the city website and they are looking to get physical copies out into the public.

“That’ll be something as well,” said Macleod Campbell.

MichaelJoel.Hansen@jpbg.ca

On Twitter: @mjhskcdn

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