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Best holiday-themed Strava art – Canadian Running Magazine

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It’s the time of year when runners and cyclists are doing cool, holiday-related things while they’re out there logging kilometres, and creating Strava art is one of those things. Here’s the best holiday-themed Strava art we’ve discovered. (Admittedly, some of it was created on bikes, but since many runners also cycle and vice versa, we decided to relax our usually strict observance of running-only coverage for the purpose of this story.)

RELATED: Strava’s update just made creating Strava art so much easier

Much of the impressive new Strava art was created by Anthony Hoyte, a heritage consultant in Cheltenham, UK, who, as a recent CTV News story explains, has been creating holiday-themed Strava art for three years. Hoyte was inspired by Victoria Strava artist Stephen Lund.

Of course, Hoyte isn’t the only Strava artist doing great holiday-themed stuff:

Frankly, there’s a lot of Strava art that’s crudely executed and not really deserving of the term. We picked examples that don’t make you guess what the poster was trying to achieve.

And these were definitely created by runners:

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Announcing Thunder Bay's First Ever – Virtual Visual Art Fair – a virus free event! – Net Newsledger

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Exploring the artistic side at Youth Centres TBay

THUNDER BAY – Due to the current COVID-19 situation, CAHEP – Community Arts and Heritage Education Project and the Painted Turtle Art Shop are co-sponsoring the first-ever Thunder Bay Virtual Visual Art Fair as part of the Culture Days 2020 festivities – completely virus-free!

The Fair will be held over the course of a month, from September 25 – October 25, 2020, and will be hosted on Painted Turtle Art Shop’s website at this direct URL:  www.paintedturtleart.com/gallery  The Official Opening of the online exhibition will be Friday, September 25th at approximately 10:00 am and then open 24/7 for the duration of the Fair.

We’re thrilled to be showcasing 51 visual artists, who after an open “Call for Visual Art” will be displaying a wide and wonderful selection of their art including drawings, paintings, photographs, prints, digital works, textiles & sculptures.

All works are created by LOCAL visual artists who live and work right here in Thunder Bay, from student artists, emerging artists, mid-career artists to senior artists.  We will be featuring 2 artists & their work per day on our social media Facebook & Instagram accounts from Sept. 26 to Oct. 25, 2020.

As part of the Culture Days 2020 festivities, we are inviting & welcoming our Thunder Bay community as well as visitors from across Canada and beyond to our virtual online exhibition.

Join us virtually in viewing and exploring a variety of visual art with a certain and totally unique, Thunder Bay, Northwestern Ontario flair.

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Art and grieving: Painter Barbara Pratt honours mother Mary Pratt's life in new exhibit – CBC.ca

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There was no cake waiting for Barbara Pratt on her 56th birthday, something that until that point had been a tradition shared between her and her mother each year to mark the annual celebration of life. 

The warmth and love was missing for the first time.

Renowned artist Mary Pratt — her mother — died at 83 in August 2018. Mary made a career of painting hyper-realistic everyday scenes — including of baking — that resonated across the country and sent her to the top of the Canadian art world. 

Today, Barbara Pratt’s newest gallery, starting Saturday at the Emma Butler Gallery in St. John’s, pays homage to her late mother. 

“I had an idea back in 2018 to paint a painting of the cake pans, that’s in this exhibition, and I wasn’t really thinking about it in a really significant kind of way,” Pratt told CBC Radio’s On The Go

“But after my mother died, in that same year, the image became more poignant for me and I started thinking about other possibilities for images. When my birthday came I realized there wouldn’t be any birthday cake from my mom that year, for the first time ever, really, and that hit me pretty hard and fuelled my creativity.”

Pratt picked up painting from her parents. She also picked up baking from her mother, something she says is taken seriously in her family — particularly with birthdays. 

This cake was designed by Maria Clarke of Petite Sweet in St. John’s. Pratt painted it as part of her latest collection. (Submitted by the Emma Butler Gallery)

“It struck me that baking, and baking birthday cakes in particular, is essentially an act of love that you do for somebody else,” said Pratt.

“I don’t take baking birthday cakes lightly. I’m not going to bake a birthday cake for just anybody.”

‘It’s just part of what we do’

Pratt said the idea to paint cakes was obvious to her after going through some old family slides, many of which featured cake.

She said everyone in the family was happy in those captured moments, but added cake itself plays a role in societal norms. 

“Cake in general has a larger picture in our culture. We have cake with many of our rituals and celebrations. Retirement, graduations, weddings, obviously, and even at funerals you bring baked goods,” Pratt said.

“It’s just part of what we do, and that’s the way my mom approached art. It’s the way I approach it as well. It’s about representing what you know.”

Barbara Pratt says painting cakes for her newest collection came to her after the realization that she would not be receiving another of her mother’s. (Submitted by the Emma Butler Gallery)

Pratt’s new works feature actual cakes designed by Maria Clarke of Petite Sweet in St. John’s and some of her own. 

Eighteen of her paintings will be hung on the walls of the gallery from Sept. 19 to Oct. 10, and the memory of her mother and the paying of her tribute goes one step further. 

Many of the paintings were used using Mary Pratt’s brushes, and even some of her own canvases that she never had the opportunity to use, said Barbara Pratt. 

“I feel lucky, in that I have sort have been with her during the whole duration of creating work for this show,” she said. 

“There were days were days when it was very emotional for me, but uplifting at the same time.… I don’t know that it helped, but I did feel honoured by the ability to use her brushes, and her paint, and well an awful lot more of her supplies as well.”

Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador 

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Art exhibit captures memories of a changing landscape through COVID-19 pandemic – NiagaraFallsReview.ca

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We began lockdown toward the end of winter; still cold, we stayed inside. As spring opened up to possibilities, many of us took to the outdoors, walking our only contact with the broader community, awkward though those encounters might be, hailing neighbours at a careful distance.

Alliston, Ont., artist Gary Evans has been creating throughout the pandemic; some of his paintings are now being shown in an exhibition titled “Daylight” at the Paul Petro gallery in Toronto.

He, too, experienced the strangeness of the world and the way he was moving in it, differently. “Avoiding the few people out there and really relishing the freshness of the air and changing conditions of the spring, the walks and sights of the town and surrounding landscape became the subject of paintings,” he says. “I found myself trying to express the different textures of the landscape, capture a mood and witness change on a daily basis.”

A fence. A tree changing shape and the changing light.

“Intersections of architecture and nature always seem to catch my eye, and the painting ‘Alley’ is based on the view of a neighbour’s fence that runs beside a parking lot and an arena building. The small maples that peek over the fence mark the space or distance between the viewer and architecture.”

“Often I will start to paint an actual image, then slowly add marks and imaginative or abstract patterns and colours to complete the image in a more expressive and personal manner. I’m trying to create a dialogue between our inner world of feeling and subjective reality and the generic landscape we inhabit together.”

And now, we enter fall. The days shorter, the air crisper, the shadows longer. We’ll observe more carefully, wanting to etch moments in our mind. Some we’ll want to remember clearly, some framed, perhaps, with simply a sense of colours and lines and feelings. Memories to sustain us through a long winter indoors.

You can see the entire exhibition at the Paul Petro Contemporary Art gallery at paulpetro.com.

Deborah Dundas

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