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BEYOND LOCAL: Four ways to have a positive experience when engaging with social media – ElliotLakeToday.com

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This article, written by Lisa Tang, University of Guelph and Stephanie K. Nishi, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, originally appeared on The Conversation and has been republished here with permission:

Have you ever thought about all the ways social media is woven within your everyday life? This has been especially true over the past year, where social media has proven itself as a valuable communication tool to connect with family and friends, provide social support through online community groups and get a quick response to a burning question from a peer.

Globally, prior to the pandemic, an estimated 3.4 billion people used social media and this number continues to rise annually. Yet the ways in which we use social media may determine whether it has a positive or potentially negative impact on our lives.

Although research investigating social media use among populations including adolescents and young adults show some positive linkages such as a sense of connection and increased accessibility to information, negative associations with mental health including depression and anxiety are evident throughout the literature.

Our research focuses on how digital technologies influence human behaviour, and how we can leverage these technologies to improve overall health.

Social comparison and social media

The phrase “comparison is the thief of joy” rings true for social media use too. Researchers have found a link between social media use and FOMO (fear of missing out) and social comparison.

Because social media itself is relatively new, research that explores how to use these digital communication technologies to support health and wellness is emerging. For example, there is exciting research investigating the use of social media in the form of interactive applications (apps) to engage and support people in achieving personal goals and maintaining a healthy physical and mental state.

With COVID-19 triggering an increase in mental health conditions, it becomes especially important that we become conscious consumers of social media so that we can engage with it in a positive and effective way.

Tips for more positive online experiences

Based on what we currently know from published research, there are things we can do right now to help manage social media in our own lives so that we may use it in a positive and effective way:

1. Social stopwatch: Use a timer or app tracker to help moderate use. This may be helpful for mental health as research has shown that limiting social media use to no more than 30 minutes per day can reduce feelings of loneliness and depression. This can be as simple as setting a reminder to close social media, or choosing an app tracker such as Forest or Space, where setting preferences can assist with monitoring or limiting social media use.

Setting boundaries around the consumption of social media can improve productivity as well — social media use can be a distraction to daily life, work and academic tasks.

2. Social activity: Remember to take breaks to disconnect from the screen. One way to support this is by following the adage “out of sight, out of mind.” Modifying settings and turning off app notifications, hiding apps in folders away from the home screen, or taking it one step further and deleting apps to further reduce temptation.

Incorporate screen-free time by engaging in regular physical activity, which curtails the chances of developing a dependence on social media. Indeed, swapping the use of apps with increased physical activity to meet the Canadian Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines and spending active time outdoors may also help to reduce stress and depression.

3. Social snacking: We are not talking about snacking while scrolling through social media! Instead, similar to how we think of some foods as nutrient-dense which nourish our body (like apples and carrots), and others as nutrient-poor and less useful for our body (like chocolate cake and candy), social media can be thought of in the same way: engagement that makes us feel good or leaves us feeling unwell.

Aim to use social media in ways that feel good or has a purpose. Examples of productive, positive social media use include connecting with supportive friends and family, or using it to source useful information. Before you engage on social media, be aware not to overshare or post when stressed or anxious as this can result in a negative social media experience.

4. Social accountability: Be accountable to yourself and others regarding your social media use. This could mean reaching out to trusted family, friends and co-workers to ask them to gently remind you when they catch you checking your phone during face-to-face engagement. Or, you can take advantage of built-in social media monitoring applications on your phone to set social media use goals and using the apps to track your progress!

It’s helpful to think of social media as a tool that needs some training to use properly. By finding the strategies that work for us to help manage our social media use, we can welcome a positive and healthy relationship with social media.The Conversation

Lisa Tang, PhD Candidate in Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph and Stephanie K. Nishi, Postdoctoral Fellow / Visiting Lecturer, Universitat Rovira i Virgili

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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Perfecting The Influencer Pitch: How To Design An Influencer Media Kit – Forbes

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As an influencer, getting your first brand partnership is a big deal. And with new protections in place, even more creators, athletes and influencers can seek out partnerships with brands. Initiating that partnership effectively can be a challenge for influencers new to the scene.

For collegiate athletes, and any creator looking to partner with brands, creating a professional influencer media kit can help you set the tone for the relationship and ensure the partnership is mutually beneficial. 

Traditionally, a media kit contains contact information, a brief description of your personal brand and a few work samples. For influencers, ambassadors, and creators, a media kit will bridge the gap between your hard-earned community and marketers at brands. But going beyond the basics can create better results, improve your response ratio, and ultimately, boost your professionalism.

Key Components of a Media Kit for Influencers  

Building a compelling media kit should go beyond the basics. But which details feel superfluous? Casey Smith, Senior Social Media Manager at Kroger shares some of the core components influencers should include in their media kit. 

“Share your passions – tell me something about yourself beyond just numbers. In terms of numbers it’s important to include audience demographics. The potential ambassador’s audience may be a really important one to us.” 

A high-level overview of your audience demographics indicates a deeper understanding of how your content will resonate if you partner with the brand. But going one step further to customize the media kit for each potential brand partner can take your pitch to the next level, Casey explained.

“We like to see examples of sponsored content, if available. If that’s not available, then include some social posts that showcase the kind of content we could expect if partnering together.” 

Giving an example of your quality of work can help ensure your style will align with the brand’s style. It’s best to determine fit before the scope of work is agreed upon – by showcasing sample work, you’re able to front load a lot of the evaluation process.

Other metrics can also be helpful during the evaluation process.  Adam Ornelas, former Social Media & Influencer Strategist at Chipotle Mexican Grill shared some of the top data points influencers should include on their media kit.

“Sharing your audience size can be helpful, but you should also include the channels you’re active on in addition to engagement rate can be helpful for brands.”

In a space that can be tricky to quantify, showing brands important data points can go a long way for influencers.

Should Influencers Make the First Move? 

Even though a lot of influencer marketing is driven by brand outreach, some of the most successful collabs originate from influencer pitches. In fact, influencer managers source somewhere between 10-40% of their influencer partnerships from influencer pitches. Adrienne Young, Former Social Media Manager for FENTY Beauty shared that pitches can be a great ‘in’ for influencers looking to get started.

“In my experience, I’ve found that inbound inquiries are a great way [for brands] to find more micro to mid-tier influencers who are already big fans of the brand. I usually find that brands need to take initiative and make the first connection when it comes to macro to mega-influencers, however.” 

Perfecting the Pitch

Having your top stats and key content samples bundled together in one document can be helpful, but crafting an authentic and relevant pitch to brands can set your first impression apart from the rest, according to Adam. 

“Consistency and genuine love for the brand is key. Organically showing interest and affinity on social media goes a long way. Marketing teams take note of brand love and it helps create and build a relationship between you and the brand. Pursue a genuine relationship with the company and the money will come.”

In terms of delivering the pitch, it’s important to consider where your audience is most likely to receive it. Fortune often favors the bold, Adam shared.

“Focus on your authentic affinity and passion for what they’re doing. If you don’t, it’ll come across in the content you create and will fall flat with your audience. Sometimes it’s better to pursue startups and mid-sized hyper growth companies because it gives you a chance to grow with them both as a partner and financially.”

The Authenticity Imperative 

The content that resonates best with any audience is authentic. Letting that authenticity shine through in your media kit and pitch is critical, according to Greg Meade, CEO of CROSSNET.

 “Being authentic can go a long way with how a brand can onboard an influencer. I know from experience, if someone really wants to work and even sends follow up messages, we will be more inclined to act on that deal as they’d probably end up creating the most genuine content.One of our best partnerships to date is working with Sam Pedlow. He’s just a genuine person that sees the benefits of working with us (and vice versa.) Partnerships like this are the best!”

Authenticity in the media kit and in the pitch itself are equally important. Letting that authentic and genuine interest shine through can also set your pitch above the rest. Adrienne Young shared some key ways influencers can separate themselves from the crowd.

“A cold influencer pitch stands out when I can tell that the influencer is genuinely interested in working with our brand specifically, rather than sending a generic cut and paste email that I can tell that they’re sending to other brands. An influencer can also stand out by demonstrating how well they know the brand, by pointing to specific brand ideals or launches that they resonated with, which shows initiative.” 

Bridging Professionalism with Authentic Passion

Being an influencer means you’re equally invested in your chosen passion, community, and being a professional partner with your chosen brands. With a strong media kit, your community and content will shine through and generate powerful collabs with the brands in your space – and in the long run, could result in lasting brand partnerships.

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NBA Plans Daily, Weekly Podcasts in New Deal With IHeart Media – BNN

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(Bloomberg) — The National Basketball Association is developing a slate of original podcasts about the league’s greatest moments and players, part of a new deal with IHeart Media Inc., the largest radio station owner in the U.S.

The NBA and IHeart will collaborate on the shows, with the San Antonio-based radio giant handling the production, distribution and advertising sales, according to a statement Wednesday. In addition to its radio stations, IHeart operates one of the largest networks of podcasts in the U.S.

The NBA believes podcasts can help it reach a new audience, and lure more casual fans to watch games. Viewership of the NBA has slipped from its pre-pandemic heights. The audience for the most recent season was down about 25% from 2019. But the league has been one of the best at turning its players into global celebrities.

“We’ve been looking for the right partner to help bring our archives to life,” said David Denenberg, a senior vice president in charge of distribution and business affairs at the NBA’s entertainment arm. “We have tons of audio footage that’s never seen the light of day.”

The NBA has been dabbling in podcasting for a couple of years, and helped produce an audio companion to the popular documentary series “The Last Dance,” about Michael Jordan’s final year with the Chicago Bulls. The league has been an early adopter of many popular new media services, forging deals with YouTube, Twitter and Snapchat. About 80 million people listen to a podcast every week in the U.S., up 17% from a year ago.

Popular Podcasts

IHeart and the NBA are in the process of formalizing their first slate of shows, which they plan to announce in the coming months. The lineup may include daily programs, as well as limited series running about 10 episodes. IHeartMedia owns the podcast “HowStuffWorks” and has discussed making something similar that explains basketball to casual fans.

There are already dozens of NBA podcasts, and the most popular sports podcaster, Bill Simmons, follows the NBA more closely than any other professional league.

Yet the NBA isn’t interested in talk podcasts, which make up the bulk of such shows. Instead, the 75-year-old league thinks its vault of recordings about players and historical moments will make it stand out.

“The NBA has an ability to drive culture beyond just sports in a way a lot of leagues are envious of,” said Conal Byrne, chief executive officer of IHeartmedia’s digital audio group. “We’ve had our eye on this league for a while to help it ramp up faster into podcasting.”

©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

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Chinese stocks pare losses as state media try to stem panic – Al Jazeera English

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The wobbly trade in Chinese markets came as state-owned securities newspaper urged calm on Wednesday and talked up markets.

Chinese shares fell on Wednesday but trimmed earlier losses amid volatile trade as state-run financial media called for calm following a wild rout triggered by investor concerns about tightening government regulation.

The Shanghai Composite Index fell as much as 2 percent before finishing the morning session down 0.59 percent. The blue-chip CSI300 index clawed back some of its losses to end the morning flat, but was still down more than 6.6 percent for the week.

In Hong Kong, the benchmark Hang Seng Index flitted between gains and losses to fall 0.24 percent at midday after plunging an eight-month closing low a day earlier. The Hang Seng China Enterprises Index was up 0.38 percent.

Andy Maynard, head of equities at China Renaissance in Hong Kong, said the market mood on Wednesday was “nervous” rather than panicked.

“Is the downside over? No, it’s not. Do we think there’s going to be more? Yes, there probably is. Do I think there’s some relief here? Yes.”

The Hang Seng Tech index, which hit record lows a day earlier, was barely lower. Real estate firms in Hong Kong rose 1.5 percent even as a mainland index tracking the sector fell 0.45 percent.

A CSI index tracking education firms listed on mainland and Hong Kong markets fell 0.52 percent.

Talking up markets

Chinese state media talked up the market after a wave of selling that had seen nearly $1.5 trillion of market value wiped off Hong Kong and mainland shares in the three trading days through Tuesday, according to Bloomberg-compiled data. Investors have dumped stocks in the crosshairs of Beijing’s sweeping regulatory crackdowns, with selling also spreading to bond and currency markets.

In a front-page commentary on Wednesday, the state-owned Securities Times said systemic risks “do not exist in the A-share market overall”.

“The macroeconomy is still in a steady rebound stage, and short-term fluctuations do not change the long-term positive outlook for A-shares,” the commentary said.

“The recent market decline to some extent reflects misinterpretation of policies and a venting of emotion. Economic fundamentals have not changed and the market will stabilise at any moment,” it said.

Other major securities dailies echoed the commentary in market reports.

In a front-page story citing domestic fund managers, the official China Securities Journal said the sell-off was a “structural adjustment”, a sustained plunge is unlikely and the market does not face systemic risk.

A story in the state-run Shanghai Securities News quoted domestic analysts as saying the sell-off would not continue, and that the market will gradually stabilise.

“For institutions, the decline brings the opportunity for positioning in high-quality shares,” it said.

Fixed income and foreign exchange markets were relatively steady on Wednesday after succumbing to Tuesday’s sell-off. The most-traded 10-year Chinese government bond futures, for September delivery, were last down 0.09 percent, following a 0.35 percent drop a day earlier.

China’s yuan firmed from a more than three-month trough against the dollar hit a day earlier, as some investors expected leading state banks could step in soon to support the currency. The yuan’s late slump fed into the People’s Bank of China’s weakest daily fixing in three months on Wednesday.

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