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Cheap but unregulated: Why illegal carpooling is a growing problem – CBC.ca

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Samantha Feder just wanted to get to Toronto.

In September, the Ottawa woman booked a trip with Amigo Express, a company that connects drivers with passengers looking to share the costs of long-distance trips, in what she expected would be a four-seat sedan.

But when she showed up on her day of departure, a shuttle-style van with an unfamiliar licence plate and more than a dozen random strangers inside was waiting for her.

“It was clear to me that there were people who maybe had booked from other services [like] Kijiji or Craigslist,” Feder said.

“I decided I was not going to get into the car.”

‘I decided I was not going to get into the car,’ Feder said. (Yasmine Mehdi/Radio-Canada)

Kijiji, Craigslist and other such sites are filled with requests from drivers seeking passengers to share the cost of one-off trips, such as chipping in for gas, a practice that’s completely above board.

But there are also posts offering multiple trips a day in state-of-the-art vans equipped with the internet and other amenities — and that sort of unlicensed carpooling is prohibited in both Ontario and Quebec.

Strict rules

In Ontario, transportation services that take passengers across municipal boundaries for a fee — aside from taxis and personal carpools — must have a proper operating licence through the Ontario Highway Transport Board.

Under the Public Vehicles Act, carpooling vehicles cannot carry more than 10 people. 

They can only make a single, one-way or round trip per day, drivers can only charge to cover the costs of operating the vehicle, and the presence of passengers must be “incidental” to the driver’s purpose for the trip, according to transportation ministry spokesperson Kristine Bunker.

“Drivers offering intercity rideshare services for compensation above and beyond reimbursement for expenses incurred to operate the vehicle are in contravention of these requirements,” wrote Bunker in an email.

The regulations are also clear in Quebec: According to a statement on the transportation’s ministry website, there is “no such thing as commercial carpooling.”

A quick scan of sites like Kijiji and Craigslist turns up a number of drivers offering passengers rides for a fee. There are strict rules around paying for an intercity carpool, and a Radio-Canada investigation has found a number of drivers are willing to skirt them. (Radio-Canada)

As part of an investigation into the scope of illegal carpooling, Radio-Canada reserved a trip from Ottawa to Montreal with a driver who was offering six trips — three there and three back — each day. 

Using hidden cameras, Radio-Canada reporters showed up at the meeting point twice to find the same driver in the same vehicle.

When asked if he had a special Ontario permit for this type of trip, the driver said he didn’t and then told the reporters to “take a Greyhound” instead. 

Contacted by Radio-Canada a few days later, the driver said he had ended this sort of activity. As of Friday, however, his advertisement was still online.

No licensing, no oversight

Radio-Canada also spoke to a group of people waiting for a similar carpooling pickup in the ByWard Market. Many said they weren’t worried about safety risks, calling it a more affordable option than taking either the bus or the train.

“It is a problem,” said Kristine D’Arbelles, a spokesperson with the CAA.

D’Arbelles said the internet has made illegal carpooling much easier, with risks to passengers. There’s no way of knowing if the driver has a valid driver’s licence, if they’re insured, or what condition their vehicle is in, she said.

“There is no licensing and there is no oversight,” she said.

CAA spokesperson Kristine D’Arbelles says illegal carpooling is concerning because drivers may be unlicensed and therefore not subject to oversight. (Yasmine Mehdi/Radio-Canada)

Amigo Express, also known as Kangaride, declined an interview with Radio-Canada.

The company’s director, Marc-Olivier Vachon, wrote in an email the company was taking all steps to stem the improper use of sites like Kijiji.

A spokesperson with Kijiji said the site is taking measures to counter illegal carpooling, and has a “dedicated commitment” to comply with the law.

“We commit significant resources toward the detection and prevention of activities that infringe our policies — this includes industry-leading technology and a dedicated community support team, in addition to help from our community of Kijiji users who flag inappropriate postings,” wrote Marie-Philippe Busque in an email.

As for Feder, while she was able to get her booking refunded, she ended up having to take an expensive last-minute train to Toronto.

“Although they did give me credits, I haven’t used the service since,” she said.

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Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world on Sept. 23 – CBC.ca

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The latest:

As cases of coronavirus in provinces across Canada continued to rise, health and government officials are stressing the importance of following public health measures and introducing new restrictions designed to curb its spread.

According to the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), the country is at a “crossroad” in its pandemic battle and the actions of individual Canadians will decide whether there’s a massive spike in COVID-19 cases coming.

“With minimal controls, the virus is capable of surging into a very sharp and intense peak because most Canadians don’t have immunity to the virus,” Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam said during a news conference in Ottawa.

A new model presented by Canada’s top doctor on Tuesday, shows that the epidemic is accelerating nationally. They warned that if Canadians don’t step up preventative measures, the virus could spread out of control and trigger a wave of infections bigger than the first one.

Preventative measures include enhanced sanitation and hand washing, physical distancing and wearing masks.

Short-term projections show there could be up to 155,795 cases and up to 9,300 deaths by Oct. 3.

Minister of Health Patty Hajdu looks on as Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam responds to a question during a news conference in Ottawa. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

Meanwhile in Ontario, officials were expected to detail the province’s fall COVID-19 plan but instead, Premier Doug Ford and Health Minister Christine Elliot said those details will be laid out in stages in the coming days.

“If we lay it all out at once, the message isn’t going to get out to people,” Ford said at his daily news conference Tuesday, as he also introduced “the largest and most comprehensive flu campaign in Canada’s history.”

According to Ford, the first part of the plan is pushing people to get their flu shots this fall.

“We’ve ordered 5.1 million doses for the entire province and we are working to order even more,” he said, adding that the province will spend $70 million on the doses.

Ontario reported an additional 478 cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday, the most of any single day since May 2.

WATCH | Never more important to get a flu shot, Ford says:

As part of its fall preparedness plan to fight the coronavirus, Ontario Premier Doug Ford said the province is investing $70 million in a flu shot campaign. 1:34

Ottawa also hit a new record on Tuesday, with 93 new coronavirus cases — surpassing the city’s previous single-day high of 76 that was set on April 29.

Ottawa has now had 3,772 people test positive for coronavirus, with more than 800 of those cases coming in September alone. Twenty-six more cases are now considered resolved, leaving 587 active cases, up 64 from Monday.

In Quebec, several private seniors’ residences are grappling with outbreaks, a trend that provincial officials are monitoring closely.

After a relatively stable summer, the number of COVID-19 cases in résidences pour aînés (RPA), or private seniors’ residences, has steadily crept upward from just 37 at the beginning of September to 157 on Sunday.

This comes as Quebec’s top public health official said Monday that a second wave of COVID-19 infections is underway and joined authorities in Montreal and Quebec City in urging people to reduce their social activities as much as possible in the weeks ahead.

The province reported 586 new cases on Monday, the highest daily increase since late May, when the first wave of infections began to taper off.

“With today’s numbers, I’m still very, very, very concerned about the situation, to the point that I consider that we are now at the start of the second wave,” said provincial Public Health Director Dr. Horacio Arruda at a news conference in Quebec City.

Of the 35 RPA residences reporting cases, four — all located in outlying regions of Quebec — are considered critical, with more than a quarter of the residents confirmed positive.

At Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary, another patient has died and 14 other patients and six staff members have tested positive for COVID-19.

It is the second death linked to the outbreak at the hospital. A total of 88 staff members are now in isolation, Alberta Health Services (AHS) said Tuesday. But the site remains fully staffed as it uses overtime and reassignments to cover shifts as needed.

Two patients have died after a COVID-19 outbreak at Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary. A total of 14 patients and six staff members have tested positive. (Alberta Health Services)

AHS continues to investigate how the virus entered the affected units.

Also experiencing an outbreak is Winnipeg’s Parkview Place personal care home where seven residents have tested positive for COVID-19, after one staff member tested positive for the disease last week.

Two residents of the downtown care home tested positive over the weekend, and five residents tested positive on Monday, according to a letter signed by Dr. Rhonda Collins, chief medical officer of Revera Inc., the company that oversees the home.


What’s happening in the rest of Canada

As of 5 p.m. ET on Tuesday, Canada had 146,417 confirmed or presumptive coronavirus cases. Provinces and territories listed 126,246 of those as recovered or resolved. A CBC News tally of deaths based on provincial reports, regional health information and CBC’s reporting stood at 9,274.

COVID-19 test kits are expected to be delivered to some pharmacies in Ontario “either the end of this week or … within the coming days,” said Allan Malek, chief pharmacy officer at the provincial pharmacists’ association.

But, he said, the provincial government has not given an official start date for testing at pharmacies. Only certain pharmacies will participate initially, and the tests will be administered by pharmacists.

Shoppers Drug Mart, Rexall, Walmart Canada and smaller, independent pharmacies are expected to take part.

A student from H.B. Beal Secondary School in London, Ont., has tested positive for COVID-19.

While the Middlesex London Health Unit (MLHU) said it won’t be disclosing any details about the case due to privacy, including if the person is a student or a staff member, CBC News has confirmed the case involves a student. 

The province keeps a list of schools where there are active cases of the virus, detailing the number of students and staff infected. As of Monday evening, the provincial database had not been updated to include the London case. 

MLHU said members of the school community who have been identified as close contacts to the confirmed case will be notified directly by the health unit and will be directed to get tested.

The University of Ottawa has notified students and faculty that its 2021 winter semester will be composed “primarily of remote learning, with only a few exceptions.”

The University of Ottawa has notified students and faculty that its 2021 winter semester will be composed ‘primarily of remote learning, with only a few exceptions.’ (Raphaël Tremblay/Radio-Canada)

The school has been adapting to teaching remotely, according to Jill Scott, the provost and vice-president of academic affairs, but the university also needs to look ahead as the public health risk COVID-19 poses persists.

“Due to the ongoing pandemic, it is now clear that there will be no large-scale return to campus soon,” wrote Scott in a memo sent to students and staff late Monday afternoon.

“This is not a decision that has been taken lightly. Nonetheless, after extensive research consultations with faculty and staff, and with public health officials, I am confident that this is the responsible choice for uOttawa.”

A teacher in British Columbia has made a workplace safety complaint after contracting COVID-19 from a student.

The teacher at Sentinel Secondary in West Vancouver was contacted on Saturday by the student becaue he was worried about his school work and wanted to continue studying online, according to the president of the teachers’ association.

By Sunday, she was feeling unwell. She tested positive for COVID-19 the same day.

The school confirmed to CBC News on Tuesday that two members of the school community had tested positive and are self-isolating at home.

WATCH | Tough back-to-school choices in neighbourhoods at high risk for COVID-19:

Parents in more marginalized neighbourhoods, which have a higher risk of COVID-19, faced tough choices when it came to sending kids back to school. 6:25

St. John’s International Airport will begin screening all departing passengers this week, an announcement that comes as Newfoundland and Labrador recorded no new cases of COVID-19 on Monday.

The province currently has one active case of the virus. The total caseload is 272, with 268 people recovered and three deaths.

Starting Wednesday, all people flying out of YYT will have their temperature taken, as will non-passengers who are entering the secure area of the airport. 

The measures are already in place at the four biggest Canadian airports — Montreal, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver.


What’s happening around the world

According to Johns Hopkins University, the global total of confirmed coronavirus cases stands at more than 31.4 million. More than 967,000 people have died, while over 21.5 million have recovered.

The U.S. death toll from the coronavirus topped 200,000 Tuesday, a figure unimaginable eight months ago when the scourge first reached one of the world’s richest nations, with its sparkling laboratories, top-flight scientists and stockpiles of medicines and emergency supplies.

“It is completely unfathomable that we’ve reached this point,” said Jennifer Nuzzo, a Johns Hopkins University public health researcher.

The bleak milestone, by far the highest confirmed death toll from the virus in the world, was reported by Johns Hopkins, based on figures supplied by state health authorities. But the real toll is thought to be much higher, in part because many COVID-19 deaths were probably ascribed to other causes, especially early on, before widespread testing was in place.

The number of dead in the U.S. is equivalent to a 9/11 attack every day for 67 days. It is roughly equal to the population of Salt Lake City, Utah, or Huntsville, Ala.

WATCH | COVID-19 cases rise in Australian state of Victoria:

Amid an uptick in COVID-19 cases, the premier of Victoria, Australia, is encouraging people to get tested if they have even the mildest of symptoms. 1:06

The premier of Australia’s Victoria state, where infections are on the rise, is encouraging people to get tested even if they have the mildest of symptoms.

“Extra positive cases because of a higher testing rate will not hold us back from taking safe and steady next steps,” Daniel Andrews said Tuesday. “What could hold us back is if we don’t have enough people coming forward and getting tested and we don’t think the test results are an accurate picture of how much virus is out there.”

He said he understands how difficult the circumstances are, but urged people to “show absolute determination … to fight the second wave and to fight it properly.”

The European Union summit has been postponed for a week because European Council President Charles Michel has gone into quarantine after a close collaborator was diagnosed with COVID-19.

Spokesperson Barend Leyts said Tuesday that Michel “today learned that a security officer, with whom he was in close contact early last week, tested positive for COVID.”

The summit set for Thursday and Friday was to address issues as wide-ranging as Brexit negotiations, climate change and the tensions between Greece and Turkey over energy rights.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has tightened restrictions as the United Kingdom faces what he called a “turning point” in the pandemic

“A month ago, on average around a thousand people across the U.K. were testing positive for coronavirus everyday,” Johnson said Tuesday. “The latest figure almost quadrupled to 3,929.”

He said the number of cases is growing fastest among people age 29 to 39, though the virus is also spreading to other, more vulnerable age groups.

Johnson asked people who can work from home to do so while pubs, bars and restaurants in England must close at 10 p.m. and operate a table service only.

That means customers will not be allowed to order at the bar.

Governments in Scotland and Northern Ireland both went further — Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said that with a few exceptions people will be barred from visiting others’ homes.

WATCH | England sets new restrictions to curb COVID-19:

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said a dangerous surge in the coronavirus has prompted tighter rules for England, but the restrictions are short of a full lockdown. 1:35

Indonesia on Tuesday reported its biggest daily rise in coronavirus deaths with 160 fatalities, data from the country’s COVID-19 task force showed.

The nation has 9,837 deaths overall, the highest death toll in Asia outside India. It also reported 4,071 new coronavirus infections, bringing the total number of cases in the Southeast Asian country to 252,923.

Health officials in Israel fear that a three-week lockdown, imposed on Friday to curb a new spike of COVID-19 cases, may not be long or restrictive enough to slow the daily toll and relieve hospitals that they warn could soon reach capacity.

New cases have reached daily highs of more than 5,000 among the nation’s population of nine million, sharply rebounding from single-digit lows following a relatively stricter initial lockdown from March to May.

A man decides to take the stairs as a sign advises riders that only one rider at a time is permitted on an elevator due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak, Thursday, July 23, 2020, at Boston University in Boston. (Charles Krupa/The Associated Press)

On the front lines of Israel’s second COVID-19 wave are doctors and nurses working around the clock at Ichilov hospital, where half of 60 COVID-19 patients are in serious condition and require ventilation, according to a hospital spokesperson.

Australia’s virus hot spot of Victoria on Tuesday reported a more than doubling in new COVID-19 infections, likely as a result of increased testing, while states elsewhere in the country said border restrictions would be relaxed as case numbers dwindled.

Officials said the northeastern state of Queensland would open its borders to parts of neighbouring New South Wales (NSW), the country’s most populous state, amid growing confidence that Australia’s second wave of infections has been contained.

NSW has maintained new daily infections in the single digits since Sept. 11, reporting only two cases in the past 24 hours, both of which were overseas travellers already in quarantine.

President Rodrigo Duterte says he has extended a state of calamity in the Philippines by a year to allow the government to draw emergency funds faster in order to fight the COVID-19 pandemic and harness the police and military to maintain law and order.

Duterte first placed the country under a state of calamity in March when the number of confirmed infections was approaching 200 with about a dozen deaths. The country now has more than 290,000 confirmed cases, the highest in Southeast Asia, with nearly 5,000 deaths.

The tough-talking president lashed out at critics in his televised remarks late Monday for accusing his administration of not doing enough to contain the outbreak.

A man wearing a face mask walks along a street in Tokyo, Japan. (Carl Court/Getty Images)

The number of people testing positive for coronavirus totalled 88 in Tokyo Tuesday, the second straight day that Japan’s capital had fewer than 100 cases.

The Tokyo Metropolitan government said Tuesday the current cumulative number for those infected in the city is 24,394, 30 of them serious cases.

The drop in cases may be partly caused by the four-day weekend including two national holidays that run through Tuesday, which sees many people leave the city for leisure and not being tested.

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We looked at every confirmed COVID-19 case in Canada. Here's what we found – CBC.ca

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Canada’s first known case of COVID-19 was detected eight months ago this week. As of Sept. 22, the coronavirus has been confirmed in 146,663 people across the country.

CBC News has dug deep into the data collected by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) to examine how COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus, affects the young, the elderly, men and women in order to better understand what’s most likely to land you in hospital — or worse.

The data contains details on 121,795 cases up to the first week of September. See the methodology at the bottom to learn more.

Here are our findings.

Who is getting the virus?

In the early days, people over 80 years old made up the largest group getting sick as long-term care homes were hit hard, resulting in more older people getting tested.

But CBC’s analysis reveals that since mid-August, infections among young people (under 30) have surged and now, after a summer of provincial reopenings and expanded testing, cumulatively outnumber the elderly.

COVID-19 infections are also on the rise among the very youngest (under 20) as schools, colleges and universities reopen.

How is the virus affecting us?

Symptoms can vary by age group from youngest to oldest. Chills, sore throat and runny nose were reported more frequently among those under 50.

PHAC only has symptom data on seven per cent of cases in the detailed data as not every province records this. The way symptoms are defined and recorded may also vary across jurisdictions. But the 9,000 cases that do list those details suggest that people with COVID-19 suffer differently depending on age and symptoms.

*Other symptoms can include loss of taste and smell.

Who’s being hospitalized?

Close to 10 per cent of people who tested positive for coronavirus wound up in hospital, according to the cases tracked by PHAC.

Two per cent of cases landed in intensive care units (ICU) across all ages but mostly among people over 50.


In people admitted to hospital, shortness of breath and fever were more common symptoms while headaches, sore throat and runny nose were seen more often in less severe cases.

In fatal cases, shortness of breath and fever were also more common. 

“Keep in mind that mortality is often through respiratory distress,” said University of Ottawa epidemiologist Raywat Deonandan.

“It’s not surprising that those showing an early symptom of that distress [shortness of breath] would be on a shorter path to death.”

Deaths and serious illness

More than 9,200 people have died in Canada because of COVID-19.

Of all confirmed infections in Canada, six per cent, or 9,274 cases, have been fatal, with the elderly hit the hardest. Only two people under 20 are known to have died from the disease so far.

The age gap in deaths is so wide that the chart below had to be stretched for the younger victims to be visible:

More women in Canada have died from COVID-19, especially in the 80+ age group where they outnumber men. Outside that age group, more men are dying from the virus.

Deonandan says differences between men and women’s health might be affecting COVID-19 outcomes.

“Older men are more likely than women to have serious heart disease. COVID-19 might be expressing mortality through these disproportionate vulnerabilities that already exist,” he said.

But more men have been hospitalized or wound up in an ICU with COVID-19.

Recovery

By Sept. 22, of the 146,663 confirmed and presumptive cases in Canada, 126,905 had recovered.

Canada’s public health data only shows recovery times for about 10 per cent of cases.

Older people tend to suffer longer (based on this small sample), not surprising given the greater presence of other medical conditions among the elderly.

Some COVID-19 cases took as many as 11 weeks to resolve, though the average recovery time is two to three weeks.


“Older people are more likely to be hospitalized and need more intensive interventions, which in turn are associated with longer recovery periods,” said Deonandan.

Similarly, more severe cases that required hospitalization had longer recovery times.

The future

The fall return to school has health officials bracing for a rise in exposures and new infections, particularly among young people.

The data shows that the youngest cohort, age 19 or younger, is making up an increasingly larger share of Canada’s overall cases and by early September had overtaken people in their 70s.

METHODOLOGY

The main data source for this article is the detailed preliminary information on confirmed cases of COVID-19 compiled by the Public Health Agency of Canada and published by Statistics Canada.

The data is based on a case report form that provincial authorities send to PHAC for each confirmed case.

Provinces might define a confirmed case, symptoms and recovery time differently, so that must be taken into account when interpreting the data.

Not every province reports symptoms and recoveries, and those that do don’t report them for every case. Only about 9,000 cases out of 121,795 in the data contain symptom information, and only about 12,500 cases contain the recovery date.

Symptom onset and recovery dates are noted only with the week of the year. Recovery times were calculated by subtracting the recovery week from the diagnosis week and do not account for possible variations in days.

In some cases, details are excluded or modified by Statistics Canada if there is a risk of identifying a patient in the data. For example, the data does not show any fatal cases under 50 years of age, even though there were nearly 80 such cases in the daily epidemiological report from PHAC, which contains the most recent confirmed numbers. CBC used the daily epidemiological data for the chart on deaths by age and gender.

The data analysis was done in Python. Questions about how it was done? Contact data journalist Roberto Rocha at roberto.rocha@cbc.ca.

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Things To Consider When Getting Motor Vehicle Insurance

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Owning and driving a vehicle is an exciting milestone. It brings about a level of independence that you might not have enjoyed before when you had to rely on others or public transport to get around. With car ownership comes the complex process of getting the right motor vehicle insurance. Several factors have to be taken into consideration when deciding which one works best for you.

 

Here’s a list of things to consider when getting motor vehicle insurance:

  1. Paperwork

 

Before you look into the kind of insurance to get, make sure that you have the correct paperwork required for the process. This usually includes a valid license and registration. Remember, the one who is registered is the one who has to apply for the insurance and drive the car majority of the time. You can’t have another party apply for insurance for you .

 

  1. Research

Once you have your documentation in order, dedicate some time researching different insurance providers. Familiarize with  Nova Scotia insurance laws and the standard insurance policy form. Knowing your local laws and how insurance works allow you to understand what you’re signing up for and what you’re entitled to in case an accident occurs.

The insurance dynamics you need to look into include the type of insurance and what exactly it covers. For instance, during your research, you’ll encounter a third party, third party fire and theft, and fully comprehensive car insurance options.

Third-party insurance is the minimum insurance required by the law, covering damages in an accident caused by another person. Third-party fire and theft insurance packages cover the basic legal requirements of insurance as well as damages caused by fire or theft. The fully comprehensive policy covers different types of damages, events, and scenarios. Different insurance companies cover different scenarios and factors for their fully comprehensive policies. You can get more information by requesting for a quote from the insurance company.

Once you research the various insurance dynamics that are provided by various providers, you’ll be able to figure out which one offers a policy that best suits your needs.

 

  1. Calculate Mileage

Every insurance policy application includes information about your mileage. This information is required because the further or more frequently you drive, the higher the risks of you getting involved in an accident, making your premiums more expensive. Make sure to be accurate about the information you provide about your mileage. In case you’re involved in an accident and the mileage recorded doesn’t match with the mileage assessed at the time of the accident, you might not get paid out.

Mileage costs are factored in differently depending on the insurance provider you choose. This can be calculated through quotes and consultations.

 

  1. Online Reviews

Independent online reviews about specific insurance motor vehicle providers can indicate whether they’re reliable or not. You must however use your discretion when analyzing online reviews as not all are authentic. The more positive the reviews, the more likely you’ll have a positive experience when you choose that specific provider.

 

  1. Consultation

Now that you’ve already come up with a list of your top options, it’s highly recommended to have a consultation session with these potential insurance providers. You can discuss and ask about certain details during this time, such as what the insurance company doesn’t cover. You can also get information about what they explicitly cover to avoid any assumptions or confusion. Give them a call, visit their office, or use the various contact channels provided by the insurance providers on their websites.

 

  1. Financial Means

When getting insurance, you must factor in your personal finances for monthly payments. Choosing an insurance provider and policy that can fit into your budget is advisable. It’ll be tough to commit to a policy only to find later on that you’ll be struggling to pay it off. Compare the different insurance policy costs and choose one that you can reasonably handle along with your other expenses.

 

Conclusion

Finding the right motor vehicle insurance requires effort on your side. You want to make sure that you’re securing the insurance policy and insurance provider that is right for you. Before you start the process, make sure that you have the correct documentation in order. Take the time to calculate your mileage as this is information that will be required from you. Research about the local motor vehicle insurance standards and regulations to know exactly what you’re signing up for. Once you’re familiar with the legal dynamics, don’t forget to factor in your finances and make sure you’re choosing one that budget.

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