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City of Langford revokes occupancy permit for unsafe highrise – CTV News

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VANCOUVER —
The City of Langford has decided to revoke the occupancy permit for an award-winning, 90-unit highrise apartment building.

On Wednesday, the city warned residents of the recently completed Danbrook One development – one of the city’s tallest buildings – that their new homes may be unsafe.

At the time, the city said it was unsure of the extent of the safety issues facing the building, but added it was offering support – including temporary hotel accommodations, money to cover moving expenses and assistance finding comparable rental accommodations in the area – for those who wanted to move out immediately.

The decision to revoke the building’s occupancy permit on Friday came after a city council reviewed a report from WSP engineers, an independent company the city hired to inspect the building.

WSP’s report found “life safety” deficiencies in the building’s design and construction, according to a summary provided by the city.

Tenants should expect to spend “a minimum of seven days” in temporary accommodations while building owner Centurion Property Associates makes short-term repairs to make the building safe, the city said.

“Given the ongoing uncertainty, tenants also have the option to work with Centurion Property Associates and city staff to secure long-term, alternative accommodations,” the city said.

Langford city staff have opened a “command centre” at 780 Goldstream Avenue to speak with tenants affected by the situation. The centre will be open from 5 p.m. to midnight Friday, from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, and from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.

Tenants can also reach out to city staff by emailing danbrookone@langford.ca or by calling 250-857-0314.

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Coronavirus: With US aiming to finish vaccinations in May, PM 'optimistic' Canada's timeline could speed up – CTV News

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OTTAWA —
While U.S. President Joe Biden pledges that there will be enough COVID-19 vaccine supply for every adult in America by the end of May, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he’s not ready yet to say Canada’s immunization timeline will speed up, but he’s “very optimistic” it will.

“We are now fully back on track and even ahead of schedule in terms of where we were hoping to be for the end of March,” Trudeau said Wednesday, facing questions about Canada’s pace of immunization, in light of Biden moving up his country’s timeline.

What the prime minister seems to be waiting to see—noting the delivery shortages and delays Canada experienced in the first months of the mass vaccination campaign— is “if indeed, all the vaccines that we’ve contracted for are able to be manufactured and shipped in the right ways.”

For months, the federal government has stuck to its pledge that every Canadian who wants to be vaccinated, will be by the end of September. It’s a timeline that officials have indicated could accelerate should additional vaccines be approved and arrive in this country in the months ahead.

The uptick in supply has begun, with last week’s Health Canada authorization of the AstraZeneca vaccine, and could be given another shot in the arm in the weeks ahead if Johnson & Johnson’s single-dose vaccine is given the green light.

Asked whether he was concerned about the impact that the American economy likely fully reopening ahead of Canada’s might have, Trudeau noted the different pandemic experiences both countries have had and cautioned against comparing.

“It’s possible that those timelines be moved forward, and we’re certainly going to work closely with the provinces in order to try and get to that, to get vaccinations to Canadians as quickly as possible so that we can loosen and reopen as quickly as possible,” he said.

Should the U.S. have all the doses needed in that country by the end of May, it opens up questions as to whether larger numbers could be sent to Canada earlier. It’s something Trudeau said he’s spoken with Biden about generally, but there’s no concrete commitment that Canada would be in line to receive any potential surplus from the U.S.

Trudeau indicated that in his conversations with Biden he seemed “very open to helping out other countries,” once Americans were immunized, and said it’s a conversation that will continue.

The most recent COVID-19 vaccination timeline showed that at least 14.5 million Canadians will be able to be immunized by the end of June with Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna doses, but that could increase up to 24.5 million Canadians if additional shots are granted regulatory approval.

The remaining millions of Canadians who are eligible to receive these vaccines would be left waiting until sometime between July and September.

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Growing number of Canadians say Trudeau doing 'bad job' on vaccine rollout even as pace quickens – National Post

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Respondents living in Alberta were most critical, with 71 per cent saying Trudeau did a bad job. Atlantic Canada was the least critical, with 43 per cent

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OTTAWA — A growing number of Canadians believe the Trudeau government has fumbled its efforts to deliver COVID-19 vaccines to the public in a timely manner, according to a new poll.

The survey by Maru Public Opinion, commissioned by the National Post, found 57 per cent of respondents agreed with the statement Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has thus far done a “bad job” of distributing vaccines to the provinces, an increase of 14 per cent from when the same question was asked in the first week of January. At the same time, 60 per cent of respondents said the provinces are doing a “good job” of administering vaccines, up five per cent over the same period.

The poll results come amid rising public impatience with the federal government’s vaccination campaign, which has been hampered by temporary supply shortages and distribution delays. Federal efforts have nonetheless begun to show signs of returning to initial targets in recent days, with public health officials now hinting that vaccines could be administered well before the government’s end of September deadline.

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Even so, Canada’s dismal ranking in administering vaccines compared with other countries could have a lingering effect on public perception of the Trudeau government, particularly if new delays crop up, said John Wright, executive vice-president of Maru Public Opinion. That could in turn carry some weight should Parliamentarians trigger an election this spring.

“If they’re looking towards an election in June, which seems to be speculation, then I would be concerned about this, because the ballot question is not so much about vaccines as it is about competence,” Wright said.

However, public opinion could always shift back should the Liberals meet or exceed their current targets, he said.

“I think this can be reversed, but it could take the next month or more.”


  1. Trudeau ‘very optimistic’ vaccine rollout can be accelerated and move closer to U.S. goals

  2. Novavax already has an order to supply Canada with 52 million doses of its vaccine and is now seeking regulatory approval from Health Canada.

    Redacted Novavax COVID-19 vaccine contract for Canada released in U.S. regulatory filings

Maru surveyed 1,515 randomly selected Canadians on March 1 and 2; the poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.5 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

Respondents living in Alberta were most critical of the federal government, with 71 per cent saying Trudeau did a bad job, up from 52 per cent in January. The next most critical provinces were Manitoba and Saskatchewan (66 per cent), Ontario (61 per cent) and Quebec (52 per cent).

Atlantic Canada was the least critical, with 43 per cent saying Ottawa had done a bad job, up from 27 per cent two months earlier. Atlantic Canada also saw a drop in people who believed Ottawa had done a “good job,” from 73 per cent down to 57 per cent.

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Also in the survey, 62 per cent of respondents said they would get a vaccine “immediately,” up from 55 per cent in January and 36 per cent in December. The number of respondents who said they wouldn’t get vaccinated fell from 16 per cent in December to 10 per cent in March.

“It just shows the appetite,” Wright said. “We’ve got a population now that has confidence that this vaccine is going to work, and they want it. And when you see the demand escalating among the public and you don’t have the supply, that’s where the issue of competence certainly is going to play out.”

The schedule for Canada’s vaccine rollout remains highly uncertain. Ottawa has contracts with seven vaccine makers internationally, but still needs to approve some manufacturers, including Johnson & Johnson and Novavax. The federal government last weekend approved Oxford University’s AstraZeneca vaccine, providing a major boost in incoming orders after Moderna and Pfizer both delayed shipments to Canada earlier this year.

Dr. Howard Njoo, deputy chief health officer at the Public Health Agency of Canada, said it now seems plausible that the federal government could beat its target of administering two vaccine doses to all Canadians by the end of September. The Trudeau government has been holding to the September date, viewed by many as a purposefully generous timeline that Ottawa could easily meet.

“If you look at it, the timelines would shift and we would be able to cover up, you know, the vast majority of the Canadian population in a sort of advanced timeline, or moving it up by several weeks,” Njoo said in a conference call with media Thursday.

• Email: jsnyder@postmedia.com | Twitter:

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Henry apologizes for ‘communications’ over second-dose cancellations – Business in Vancouver

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B.C.’s top doctor is expressing regret over how the province communicated to those expecting to get their second COVID-19 vaccine dose before those appointments were cancelled.

Provincial officials revealed earlier this week the province would expand the interval between first and second doses from six weeks to 16 weeks in a bid to immunize more British Columbians sooner, albeit with lower levels of protection.

This change in strategy resulted in thousands of cancellations of previously scheduled vaccinations that would have delivered second doses to at-risk British Columbians.

“I will regret and apologize to those communities, to the long-term care homes and to the individuals who had a second dose scheduled,” provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said during a Thursday (March 4) briefing.

“I regret that our communications weren’t able to keep up as fast as the decision-making, but please know that this was made in the spirit of understanding data and maximizing the benefit.”

B.C. officials justified the decision to expand the interval between doses by pointing to data that shows vaccines are proving to be effective for at least four months after a single dose.

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommended on Wednesday that provinces should consider significantly delaying administering first and second doses if they’re facing a limited supply of vaccine.

Pfizer Inc. (NYSE:PFE) and Moderna Inc. (NYSE:MRNA) recommend intervals of three to four weeks, but B.C. had been administering doses six weeks apart since January amid ongoing vaccine shortages.

The shift to 16-week intervals means many second doses for older British Columbians won’t commence until the summer — much later than planned when the province unveiled its strategy in January.

But younger British Columbians who would not have been getting their first doses until the summer are likely to receive those shots by the spring.

Henry said the province is now working on revising its timelines for when British Columbians can expect to be vaccinated.

This comes as the first delivery of 500,000 AstraZeneca plc vaccine doses from the Serum Institute of India are due to arrive in the province by next week.

About 300,000 doses are due to expire April 2 and Henry said she could not yet provide estimates on how many are bound for B.C.

B.C.’s allotment of AstraZeneca doses have been earmarked for first responders and essential workers, which Henry acknowledge as covering a broad swath of people who don’t have the ability to work from home.

“We will prioritize our delivery of these vaccines accordingly and I want to be clear: This is not a random process,” she said.

“This is not me making a decision. We follow a very defined process.”

Henry said NACI’s definition of these workers continues to be refined and the province will refer to those categories when making its decision about which workers to vaccinate first.

torton@biv.com

@reporton

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