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Coronavirus: Markham, Ont., landlord in eviction fight with real estate agent – Globalnews.ca

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A Markham, Ont. woman says she has been struggling for months to evict a non-paying tenant who she previously used as her real estate agent — a fight with no clear end as landlord-tenant hearings remain at a standstill amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

When Natalie Wild’s husband, Stefan, was diagnosed with an aggressive cancer in January, the family decided to downsize to a nearby rental property they own better suited to his needs.

“(Our current home) has a lot of stairs. He was unable to walk comfortably,” she said.

Wild said her tenant, Stacey Kelenjian, who was a friend, had initially agreed to move out by the end of April, but Wild claims when she mentioned her current home was listed with another agent, her attitude changed.

“She refused to acknowledge the forms,” Wild said.

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“She was verbally aggressive.”


READ MORE:
Toronto homeowners fight to evict tenant ‘taking advantage’ of COVID-19

Weeks later, Wild said Kelenjian — who is a real estate agent registered to Century 21 – Leading Edge Realty Inc. in Scarborough, Ont. — sent her an email saying she was “blind sided” by the decision to sell the home though a different agent, since she had tried selling the house for the family years earlier.

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The March 5 email ended by stating she would only continue discussing their disagreement over the rental condo after she is “compensated” $1,500 for her past work.

When rent came due in April, Wild said her tenant told her she could no longer pay because of COVID-19 loss of income and wouldn’t be moving out anytime soon.

“It’s really disheartening that someone is taking pure advantage of a really terrible situation,” Wild alleged.


Stacey Kelenjian is a real estate agent registered to Century 21 – Leading Edge Realty Inc. in Scarborough, Ont. Source: HomeFinder.ca.


Source: HomeFinder.ca

Stacey Kelenjian is a real estate agent registered to Century 21 – Leading Edge Realty Inc. in Scarborough, Ont. Source: HomeFinder.ca

In a conversation over the phone on Thursday, Kelenjian declined an interview. Despite her email to Wild, she denied she demanded payment as a condition to negotiating her eviction. She called Wild a bully and said she failed to find a solution.

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In mid-March, the Ontario government suspended most in-person landlord and tenant hearings and enforcement of evictions as part of efforts to contain the spread of COVID-19.

Harry Fine, a Toronto paralegal who specializes in landlord-tenant issues, said the existing backlog of cases is quickly growing amid the pandemic, leaving the system in a “crisis state.”

“It’s beyond description,” he said, “the problem for landlords who are going to lose their properties and tenants who are going to lose their homes.”


READ MORE:
Brockville Ont., area politicians urge federal government for rent relief program

Wild’s husband died from cancer in April. She is now seeking to evict for non-payment rather than to move into the unit.

Wild has filed a complaint to the Real Estate Council of Ontario (RECO) regarding Kelenjian.

In an email to Global News, the council said, “RECO is aware of the situation and is actively looking into the matter. Due to the active status of the file we cannot release any further details.”

Kelenjian’s brokerage, Century 21 – Leading Edge Realty, did not return a phone call or email by deadline.

Wild said she hopes to put this chapter behind her soon.

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“I still have bills to pay,” she said.

“I have condo fees on the unit as well as the monthly mortgage fee and that’s completely now shouldered by myself.”

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Douglas Todd: China's real-estate investors down on Vancouver, but not out – Vancouver Sun

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Huawei CEO Meng Wenghzou must stay under mansion arrest following this week’s court decision in Vancouver. China’s authorities rage, while continuing to unfairly jail Michael Spavor and Michael Korvig and drastically cut imports of Canadian canola.

Rival ethnic Chinese groups clash in the streets of Vancouver over Beijing’s clampdown on Hong Kongers’ freedoms. COVID-19 kills more than 6,800 across Canada and lockdown virtually ends international travel, sending home many of China’s foreign students, especially from Toronto and Vancouver.

China-Canada relations are at their lowest ebb in decades, particularly according to China’s pervasive regime-backed media outlets, which this week called Canada a “pathetic clown.”

And that has implications for Metro Vancouver’s housing market.

This region of 2.6 million is feeling the impact of soured relations with China, even while polling suggests the city continues to retain some of its traditional allure to the world’s most populous country as a desirable place to experience and invest in.

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Ontario Real Estate Association hands down new guidelines as folks begin looking back into housing market – Barrie 360 – Barrie 360

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While officials are expecting the Canadian housing market to take a real hit because of the COVID pandemic, Ontario realtors are still taking steps to protect those who want to buy or sell a home.

The Ontario Real Estate Association (OREA) has issued a series of guidelines to protect the health and safety of not just those in the market to buy or sell, but the realtors doing the deals too.

The OREA says virtual home showings should continue for now

Most home showings have been done virtually since the emergency was declared in Ontario, and the OREA says that should become standard practice for now. Documents, forms, and acknowledgments should be processed electronically according to these guidelines. The OREA asks that physical home showings should be preceded by thoroughly disinfecting surfaces, and a physical distance should be maintained while interacting with clients directly. The OREA asks that personal protective equipment be used when distancing isn’t possible. A complete list of the OREA’s recommendations can be found on its website.

Housing starts, sales, and prices are expected to be impacted by the pandemic through 2022

Now that the Ontario Government has announced a phased reopening, the OREA feels many consumers are looking to get back into the market in person. “The health and safety of our Realtors and their clients is OREA’s top priority during this pandemic,” says Sean Morrison, President of OREA. “As Ontario’s economy reopens, many Ontarians are looking to get back into the real estate market. Realtors are here to help make home buyers and sellers feel comfortable and safe while they work to find their dream home. OREA’s guidelines have been informed by up-to-date information from public health, best practices from the industry and experiences in jurisdictions across North America.”

RELATED: HOUSING MARKET TO BE HIT HARD BY COVID PANDEMIC THROUGH TO THE END OF 2022, ACCORDING TO CMHC HOUSING OUTLOOK

On Wednesday, the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation released a housing market outlook that shows the impacts of COVID-19 will be felt on the industry right through to the end of 2022. Housing starts, sales, and prices within Ontario will be more impacted than some, including B.C. and Quebec, but less than those of oil-dependent Alberta or Saskatchewan.

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Quebecers love the 'burbs, real estate poll suggests – Montreal Gazette

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A survey conducted by the RE/MAX Québec real estate firm suggests that 46 per cent of respondents — particularly those with young children — could see themselves buying a home in the suburbs.

The poll, carried out just as the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak were beginning to be felt across Quebec, found that 28 per cent would like to settle in the city while 21 per cent preferred the country.

Among potential sellers, the Léger poll found 58 per cent would put their homes on the block to move somewhere with more land, while 55 per cent would do so for a larger home.

A large proportion of respondents ages 55-64 would sell in order to move to a less expensive home.

RE/MAX Québec vice-president Sylvain Dansereau said the polling dates were not changed despite the health crisis, adding that a second phase of the survey will be carried out this autumn to measure the effects of the outbreak on the real estate buying and selling preferences of Quebecers.

Quebec’s real estate industry received government authorization to resume operations on May 11.

The poll was conducted March 17-29 with 1,400 respondents in six regions of Quebec and has a 2.6-per-cent margin of error 19 times out of 20.

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