Could Artis Real Estate Investment Trust’s (TSE:AX.UN) Investor Composition Influence The Stock Price? - Simply Wall St - Canada News Media
Connect with us

Investment

Could Artis Real Estate Investment Trust’s (TSE:AX.UN) Investor Composition Influence The Stock Price? – Simply Wall St

Published

on


A look at the shareholders of Artis Real Estate Investment Trust (TSE:AX.UN) can tell us which group is most powerful. Generally speaking, as a company grows, institutions will increase their ownership. Conversely, insiders often decrease their ownership over time. I generally like to see some degree of insider ownership, even if only a little. As Nassim Nicholas Taleb said, ‘Don’t tell me what you think, tell me what you have in your portfolio.

With a market capitalization of CA$1.6b, Artis Real Estate Investment Trust is a decent size, so it is probably on the radar of institutional investors. Taking a look at our data on the ownership groups (below), it’s seems that institutional investors have bought into the company. Let’s take a closer look to see what the different types of shareholder can tell us about Artis Real Estate Investment Trust.

View our latest analysis for Artis Real Estate Investment Trust

TSX:AX.UN Ownership Summary, January 16th 2020

What Does The Institutional Ownership Tell Us About Artis Real Estate Investment Trust?

Many institutions measure their performance against an index that approximates the local market. So they usually pay more attention to companies that are included in major indices.

As you can see, institutional investors own 19% of Artis Real Estate Investment Trust. This can indicate that the company has a certain degree of credibility in the investment community. However, it is best to be wary of relying on the supposed validation that comes with institutional investors. They too, get it wrong sometimes. When multiple institutions own a stock, there’s always a risk that they are in a ‘crowded trade’. When such a trade goes wrong, multiple parties may compete to sell stock fast. This risk is higher in a company without a history of growth. You can see Artis Real Estate Investment Trust’s historic earnings and revenue, below, but keep in mind there’s always more to the story.

TSX:AX.UN Income Statement, January 16th 2020
TSX:AX.UN Income Statement, January 16th 2020

Artis Real Estate Investment Trust is not owned by hedge funds. Our data shows that Ronald Joyce is the largest shareholder with 11% of shares outstanding. With 3.3% and 3.2% of the shares outstanding respectively, BlackRock, Inc. and The Vanguard Group, Inc. are the second and third largest shareholders.

Our studies suggest that the top 16 shareholders collectively control less than 50% of the company’s shares, meaning that the company’s shares are widely disseminated and there is no dominant shareholder.

While it makes sense to study institutional ownership data for a company, it also makes sense to study analyst sentiments to know which way the wind is blowing. There are a reasonable number of analysts covering the stock, so it might be useful to find out their aggregate view on the future.

Insider Ownership Of Artis Real Estate Investment Trust

The definition of an insider can differ slightly between different countries, but members of the board of directors always count. The company management answer to the board; and the latter should represent the interests of shareholders. Notably, sometimes top-level managers are on the board, themselves.

I generally consider insider ownership to be a good thing. However, on some occasions it makes it more difficult for other shareholders to hold the board accountable for decisions.

Our information suggests that insiders maintain a significant holding in Artis Real Estate Investment Trust. It is very interesting to see that insiders have a meaningful CA$184m stake in this CA$1.6b business. It is good to see this level of investment. You can check here to see if those insiders have been buying recently.

General Public Ownership

The general public, mostly retail investors, hold a substantial 70% stake in AX.UN, suggesting it is a fairly popular stock. This size of ownership gives retail investors collective power. They can and probably do influence decisions on executive compensation, dividend policies and proposed business acquisitions.

Next Steps:

While it is well worth considering the different groups that own a company, there are other factors that are even more important. For instance, we’ve identified 2 warning signs for Artis Real Estate Investment Trust that you should be aware of.

If you would prefer discover what analysts are predicting in terms of future growth, do not miss this free report on analyst forecasts.

NB: Figures in this article are calculated using data from the last twelve months, which refer to the 12-month period ending on the last date of the month the financial statement is dated. This may not be consistent with full year annual report figures.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Thank you for reading.

These great dividend stocks are beating your savings account

Not only have these stocks been reliable dividend payers for the last 10 years but with the yield over 3% they are also easily beating your savings account (let alone the possible capital gains). Click here to see them for FREE on Simply Wall St.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Investment

Information seminar on Investment Readiness Program to be held – Windsor Star

Published

on



The new home of the Downtown Windsor Business Accelerator at 1501 Howard Avenue was once Purity Dairy, which opened in the 1920s.


Nick Brancaccio / Windsor Star

An information session on how to access $10,000 to $100,000 in non-repayable capital through the federally funded Investment Readiness Program will be held Thursday.

The seminar, which is aimed at helping charities, non-profits, co-ops and for profit social enterprises, will be held at 4 p.m. at the Windsor Business Accelerator at 1501 Howard Ave. Unit 101.

The program aims to support new ideas and businesses with the goal of selling goods or services to earn revenue while also helping achieve positive social, cultural or environmental results.

The Windsor Essex Community and Sarnia Community Foundations are overseeing grants in Essex, Kent and Lambton. There is, $380,000 to award during the two-year pilot program.

The first application deadline closed earlier this month, but another round of applications will be accepted in the second half of the year.

The first grants, which will be between $10,000 and $100,000, will be announced in March or April.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Investment

Nippon Life to double foreign real estate, infrastructure investment by 2021 – TheChronicleHerald.ca

Published

on


By Tomo Uetake and Hideyuki Sano

TOKYO (Reuters) – Nippon Life Insurance Co, Japan’s largest private life insurer, plans to double its investment in foreign real estate and infrastructure by early next year, its top investment official told Reuters on Tuesday.

The move came amid growing expectation that low interest rates in Japan and other developed countries are likely to stay for a long time and therefore the insurer will need a new source of income.

Nippon Life plans to commit a total of 350 billion yen ($3.2 billion) to investments in real estate and infrastructure, mostly in North America and Europe, through funds of funds, said Kazuhide Toda, the company’s chief investment officer.

The investment would be made gradually over years, by responding to fund managers’ capital calls. The size of its investments in alternative assets was likely to about 380 billion yen by early 2021, double the level at the end of the last financial year, in March 2019, Toda said.

Like many investors in Japan and Europe, Nippon Life’s profits have been squeezed by dwindling bond yields in Japan and elsewhere.

The 10-year JGB yield stood at minus 0.04% on Tuesday, after having plunged to as low as minus 0.295% last September on fear of U.S.-China trade war.

Most European bonds also have negative yields while in the United States, now the highest-yielding among developed countries, 10-year Treasury notes yield about 1.6%, compared with more than 3.5% decade ago.

Nippon Life expects investments in the alternative assets to yield about 8% and expects to be able to afford to invest more in such illiquid assets.

On top of yield enhancement, increasing exposure to foreign real assets brings more benefits in terms of diversification, Toda said.

Partly to fund increased investment in alternative assets, Nippon Life has been expanding the use of derivatives, such as interest rates swaps and options, in its fixed income portfolio in the yen, the core of its assets.

Including group firms, Nippon Life has total assets of 81 trillion yen.

($1 = 109.70 yen)

(Additional reporting by Kazuhiko Tamaki; Editing by Robert Birsel)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Investment

Why we make bad investment decisions, the 2020 ETF Buyer’s Guide, and advice on dumping your advisor – The Globe and Mail

Published

on


Tim Ferriss is a venture capitalist – an early investor in Shopify, Uber and Facebook among numerous others – and the host of the massively popular Tim Ferriss Show podcast.

In a recent blog post, Mr. Ferriss announced his initially surprising decision to avoid reading any books in 2020 – not a single one. He confessed that he had spent too much time trying to stay on top of current events and discussions when what he actually wanted to do was get to the bottom of things.

Mr. Ferriss cited an intriguing quote by South African activist Desmond Tutu to provide a metaphor that describes his intellectual goals for the year, “There comes a point where we need to stop just pulling people out of the river. We need to go upstream and find out why they’re falling in.”

Story continues below advertisement

Applied to investing, this suggests we should spend less time listing the numerous common mistakes investors make and attempt to understand the ways basic human psychology leads us to make them.

Nobel Prize winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman, author of Thinking Fast, And Slow was introduced as ‘the most influential living psychologist’ in a recent podcast hosted by Shane Parrish. Professor Kahneman offered insight that can be readily applied to investing, and the highlights are listed on Mr. Parrish’s Farnam Street website along with the link to the podcast.

The one-hour interview is well worth the time, as the discussion ranges through many pertinent topics including why Mr. Kahneman believes people don’t value happiness very highly, and how the colour of a room can distort decision making.

The bullet points below represent the specific highlights, in Mr. Parrish’s words, that are most relevant to investors. I suggest that readers consider each one – slowly, in Mr. Kahneman’s terminology – and look for ways these psychological tendencies might be negatively affecting their portfolios,

· Very quickly you form an impression, and then you spend most of your time confirming it instead of collecting evidence.

· We have beliefs because mostly we believe in some people, and we trust them. We adopt their beliefs. We don’t reach our beliefs by clear thinking.

· Independence is the key because otherwise when you don’t take those precautions, it’s like having a bunch of witnesses to some crime and allowing those witnesses to talk to each other.

Story continues below advertisement

· What gets in the way of clear thinking is that we have intuitive views of almost everything…. What gets in the way of clear thinking are those ready-made answers, and we can’t help but have them.

— Scott Barlow, Globe and Mail market strategist

This is the Globe Investor newsletter, published three times each week. If someone has forwarded this e-mail newsletter to you or you’re reading this on the web, you can sign up for the newsletter and others on our newsletter signup page.

Stocks to ponder

Air Canada The recent share price weakness is anticipated to continue as the coronavirus spreads worldwide, the death toll rises, and news that the virus can be spread to others even when an infected person is asymptomatic. The share price closed at a record high of $52.09 on Jan. 13 and since then has dropped over 9 per cent. However, as the share price continues to fall, this may represent a buying opportunity for longer-term investors. This is a stock to watch for now; it is not yet in oversold territory. Jennifer Dowty profiles this profile of the stock.

Alpha Pro Tech This Canadian-headquarter protective apparel stock is skyrocketing on the coronavirus outbreak. Traded in the U.S., it’s been a holding of The Contra Guys for some time. They share their latest thoughts on the stock.

Story continues below advertisement

CAE Inc. After Boeing Co. recommended this month that all pilots of its 737 Max planes get training on flight simulators before the grounded aircraft return to the skies, CAE Inc. shares surged to record highs. The reason? The Montreal-based flight simulation company has found itself in a sweet spot amid a swell of interest in its pilot-training services and technology. Now, though, investors are facing a tough question: How much further can this rally go? Read more from David Berman

The Rundown

How equity markets have developed their own idea of fair value

The argument about whether equity markets are too expensive rages on, while, at the same time, stock prices in Canada and the U.S. have arranged themselves into a comprehensible assessment of fair value that no one’s talking about. Scott Barlow has this analysis that could aid investors to uncover promising opportunities.

Others (for subscribers)

Rob Carrick’s 2020 ETF Buyer’s Guide: Best Canadian equity funds

Story continues below advertisement

Monday’s analyst upgrades and downgrades

Monday’s Insider Report: CEO unloads $11-million worth of stock

Four-comma club: Predicting the next company to join trillion-dollar value elite

Hopes are high for tech stock ‘Cadillacs’; so are their prices

Ask Globe Investor

Question: For the past 20 years, my husband and I have had a financial planner at a private company, Aligned Capital Partners, Inc. He has taken care of all of our investments, including RRSPs. He charges a management fee of 1.13 per cent. When I calculated this over the 20 years we have been with him, I was aghast! I blame us for not learning enough about investing before we made the decision to go with this him.

Story continues below advertisement

The returns on our investments have been good as far as I know but I’m embarrassed to say that I do not know for sure, and currently simply don’t have the time to go through all of our records.

My question is: if we “break up” with this advisor (and we would have no desire to go with any other independent financial investment company) and move all our investments to our bank (CIBC) to work with a financial advisor there, who doesn’t charge a management fee, what might the penalty be? Would the bank possibly pay this fee in order to get our money?

We have about 10 years left before we retire, and I am getting rather nervous that we might be making a big mistake by sticking with this advisor.

I’d really appreciate your advice on this because I would find it very awkward to broach this subject with him, especially as we have a good rapport with him and, silly as it sounds, I wouldn’t want him to feel bad! On the other hand, it IS our money! I would be very grateful to get your opinion on this.

Answer: For starters, a management fee of 1.13 per cent is not out of line, presuming he does not charge you for trades and is buying F-series mutual funds. The key question is the net return you are receiving. This should be on the reports you’re getting. If not, ask him for the net return for 2019, the average annual rate of return for the past five years, and the average annual return since you started doing business with him. He should have those numbers readily available. That will give you a much better insight into how you’re doing.

What about switching to the bank? For starters, a CIBC advisor cannot buy you stocks, ETFs, etc. A bank is not a brokerage and is limited in the number of products it can offer. Their advisor will be pushing mutual funds, especially CIBC’s own brand, which will come with a much higher management expense ratio than the 1.13 per cent you have been paying. The advisor will probably earn a commission on those sales. If you’re not paying one way, you’ll pay another.

Story continues below advertisement

So, I suggest your first step is a meeting with your present advisor. Since you have a good rapport with him, he should be willing to answer all your questions honestly. Then, if you wish, have a meeting with CIBC. Ask exactly what investment products would be available to you and how the advisor is paid. You’ll then have enough information to make an informed decision.

–Gordon Pape

Do you have a question for Globe Investor? Send it our way via this form. Questions and answers will be edited for length.

What’s up in the days ahead

We’ll continue to track market developments connected to the coronavirus outbreak.

Click here to see the Globe Investor earnings and economic news calendar.

More Globe Investor coverage

For more Globe Investor stories, follow us on Twitter @globeinvestor

Click here share your view of our newsletter and give us your suggestions.

You may also be interested in our Market Update or Carrick on Money newsletters. Explore them on our newsletter signup page.

Compiled by Globe Investor Staff

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending