Connect with us

Media

Creating An Amazing Outdoor Space In Your Patio

Published

on

With social distancing and outings being discouraged, you will probably want to find ways to spend time outdoors even as you are home. Why not create a small outdoor space in your patio? Believe it or not, this is easier than it sounds, provided that you have some creative ideas and some time to implement them. And incredibly, you need not spend a fortune to build an outdoor haven right in your living space. Here are some cool ideas you can put into action for making the most of your patio area.

Buy some double-duty furniture pieces

If you have a small living space, lightweight, double-duty furniture pieces make a great pick as you can use them both indoors and outdoors. A foldable bench and table are worth considering. You can buy a large stool for the living room and use it as a table in the patio. Another cool idea is to shop large throw pillows made in weatherproof fabric, which can work as floor cushions for patio gatherings.

Invest in a built-in bench

For homeowners looking for a one-time investment, having a built-in bench in your patio is the way to go. It could be concrete or wood, depending on your preference and budget. The best thing about built-in seating is that you have the flexibility- no matter how big or small the area is, you can have a bench that fits perfectly. You can even have a built-in or folding table to create an awesome dining area outdoors.

Have a patio garden

If you are a gardening enthusiast, try having your own little green space on the patio. A vertical garden makes a great idea for smaller areas. All you need is a frame that you can install on one of the walls and arrange potted plants over it. You can shop at Home Hardware sale to pick some stuff on a budget. Or perhaps, you can pick a flyer or promo code online to grab some cool deals. A small sitting arrangement in this tiny garden completes the decor.

Ensure privacy with outdoor draperies

Those who want some privacy even in their patio can use some outdoor drapery panels to keep intrusions at bay. Weatherproof curtains offer the shade and privacy you want and you have a space that is as good as an outdoor living room. However, you will need to have a wood frame or curtain rods to hang the drapery. This could take some time and investment but the result is worth the effort.

Buy an outdoor rug

Consider buying an outdoor rug if you love that floor picnic feel under the stars. This is the safest and most cost-effective option for those trying to refurbish your small patio space for the first time. Ensure that you buy a sturdy weather-proof one that can bear the brunt of outdoor weather. Something that you can wash and clean at home is a smart pick.

These are some cool and affordable ways to convert your patio into a lovely, little sitting space. Hang around some fairy lights, play your favourite music and get some snacks while you sit here and enjoy your evenings at home!

 

Author Bio: William Josh is the new editorial lead with the team Outreach Monks. His work has been featured in several magazines and news journals.

Continue Reading

Media

Companies are increasingly turning to social media to screen potential employees – The Journal Pioneer

Published

on


Anatoliy Gruzd, Ryerson University; Elizabeth Dubois, L’Université d’Ottawa/University of Ottawa, and Jenna Jacobson, Ryerson University

As businesses around the world slowly start to reopen after being forced to shut down operations due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the graduates of the class of 2020 are sharpening their presentation skills and updating their resumes to look for employment opportunities. But will their polished resumes make them more competitive relative to their peers?

The answer may surprise you. In today’s digitally mediated world, well-prepared resumes may not be enough to make you stand out among hundreds of candidates.

Due to the increasing use of social media around the globe (especially now during #socialdistancing), many recruiters and hiring managers find social media attractive as a readily available source of real-time data to find and vet candidates.

Social media is used by potential employers to check job applicants’ qualifications, assess their professionalism and trustworthiness, reveal negative attributes, determine whether they post any problematic content and even assess “fit.”

Examples of personal information derived from social media. (Gruzd, Jacobson, Dubois)
Employers review potential employees’ online activities to pre-screen candidates. (Shutterstock)

Screening applicants

We examined social media users’ attitudes towards employers using social media to screen job applicants, a process known as cybervetting. We conducted an online survey of 454 participants, primarily from the United States and India, with a followup study surveying 482 young adults in Canada.

Examples of personal information derived from social media. (Gruzd, Jacobson, Dubois)

In these studies, we compared people’s comfort level with cybervetting in relation to different types of information that could be gathered from publicly accessible social media platforms. These were readily available information in the form of raw data and metadata, meaning what they had posted, when and how; analytics information that would require processing, for example, results of sentiment analysis or topic modelling of an applicants’ posts; and information related to users’ online social network that is often used for social network analysis, for example who follows whom on social media.

Expectations of privacy

The results revealed the nuanced nature of social media users’ privacy expectations in the context of hiring practices. Individuals have context-specific and data-specific privacy expectations. People who are already concerned about social media platforms collecting their personal information and possibly sharing it without their consent are less comfortable with third parties using social media data to screen job applicants — even if it’s publicly available.

On the other hand, individuals who are more comfortable with this practice are also more concerned that social media platforms might be storing inaccurate information about them. This may be a sign of “digital resignation,” a phenomenon in which people are worried about privacy but recognize that companies still engage in this practice. Social media users may want to ensure that information collected about them from online sources is accurate, since erroneous representations may negatively impact their success on the job market.


Read more: How blockchain could prevent future data breaches


Comfort levels

We also found that being a job-seeker does not necessarily make one more or less comfortable with cybervetting. And there is no significant relationship between one’s gender and the comfort level with this practice. Regardless of one’s employment status or gender, our findings point to the presence of expectations and concerns with social media screening.

Our results highlight the need for employers and recruiters who rely on social media to screen job applicants to be aware of the types of information that may be perceived to be more sensitive by applicants, such as social network-related information (like friends’ lists and connections among friends).

Our research stresses the importance of employers aligning their hiring practices with people’s expectations. If job applicants are aware of and not comfortable with cybervetting, companies may lose the opportunity to recruit high-quality applicants.

Alternatively, employees may lose trust in the company if they later learn about the company’s social media screening practices. Despite the lack of regulations about cybervetting in most countries, employers should proactively state if they engage in cybervetting, outline what social media will be examined and describe how the information will be used.

Ethical hiring practices matter, and this type of transparency is a first step towards giving the next generation of graduates and employees a fair chance of landing their dream job.

The Conversation
The Conversation

Anatoliy Gruzd, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Social Media Data Stewardship, Ryerson University; Elizabeth Dubois, Assistant Professor, Communication, L’Université d’Ottawa/University of Ottawa, and Jenna Jacobson, Assistant Professor, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Companies are increasingly turning to social media to screen potential employees – CanadianManufacturing.com

Published

on


Employers review potential employees’ online activities to pre-screen candidates. IMAGE: Eva-Katalin/Getty

As businesses around the world slowly start to reopen after being forced to shut down operations due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the graduates of the class of 2020 are sharpening their presentation skills and updating their resumes to look for employment opportunities. But will their polished resumes make them more competitive relative to their peers?

The answer may surprise you. In today’s digitally mediated world, well-prepared resumes may not be enough to make you stand out among hundreds of candidates.

Due to the increasing use of social media around the globe (especially now during #socialdistancing), many recruiters and hiring managers find social media attractive as a readily available source of real-time data to find and vet candidates.

Social media is used by potential employers to check job applicants’ qualifications, assess their professionalism and trustworthiness, reveal negative attributes, determine whether they post any problematic content and even assess “fit.”

Screening applicants

We examined social media users’ attitudes towards employers using social media to screen job applicants, a process known as cybervetting. We conducted an online survey of 454 participants, primarily from the United States and India, with a followup study surveying 482 young adults in Canada.

In these studies, we compared people’s comfort level with cybervetting in relation to different types of information that could be gathered from publicly accessible social media platforms. These were readily available information in the form of raw data and metadata, meaning what they had posted, when and how; analytics information that would require processing, for example, results of sentiment analysis or topic modelling of an applicants’ posts; and information related to users’ online social network that is often used for social network analysis, for example who follows whom on social media.

Expectations of privacy

The results revealed the nuanced nature of social media users’ privacy expectations in the context of hiring practices. Individuals have context-specific and data-specific privacy expectations. People who are already concerned about social media platforms collecting their personal information and possibly sharing it without their consent are less comfortable with third parties using social media data to screen job applicants — even if it’s publicly available.

On the other hand, individuals who are more comfortable with this practice are also more concerned that social media platforms might be storing inaccurate information about them. This may be a sign of “digital resignation,” a phenomenon in which people are worried about privacy but recognize that companies still engage in this practice. Social media users may want to ensure that information collected about them from online sources is accurate, since erroneous representations may negatively impact their success on the job market.

Comfort levels

We also found that being a job-seeker does not necessarily make one more or less comfortable with cybervetting. And there is no significant relationship between one’s gender and the comfort level with this practice. Regardless of one’s employment status or gender, our findings point to the presence of expectations and concerns with social media screening.

Our results highlight the need for employers and recruiters who rely on social media to screen job applicants to be aware of the types of information that may be perceived to be more sensitive by applicants, such as social network-related information (like friends’ lists and connections among friends).

Our research stresses the importance of employers aligning their hiring practices with people’s expectations. If job applicants are aware of and not comfortable with cybervetting, companies may lose the opportunity to recruit high-quality applicants.

Alternatively, employees may lose trust in the company if they later learn about the company’s social media screening practices. Despite the lack of regulations about cybervetting in most countries, employers should proactively state if they engage in cybervetting, outline what social media will be examined and describe how the information will be used.

Ethical hiring practices matter, and this type of transparency is a first step towards giving the next generation of graduates and employees a fair chance of landing their dream job.The Conversation

Anatoliy Gruzd, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Social Media Data Stewardship, Ryerson University; Elizabeth Dubois, Assistant Professor, Communication, L’Université d’Ottawa/University of Ottawa, and Jenna Jacobson, Assistant Professor, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Media Alert: June 2020 ADP Canada National Employment Report to be released on Thursday, July 16, 2020 – Canada NewsWire

Published

on


TORONTO, July 9, 2020 /CNW/ —

WHAT: The ADP Research Institute® will issue the June 2020 ADP® Canada National Employment Report, on Thursday, July 16, 2020.

Broadly distributed to the public each month, free of charge, the ADP Canada National Employment Report is produced by the ADP Research Institute.  The report, which is derived from actual ADP payroll data, measures the change in total nonfarm payroll employment each month on a seasonally-adjusted basis.  

WHEN: Thursday, July 16, 2020, 8:30a.m. ET

About the ADP Canada National Employment Report

The ADP Canada National Employment Report is a monthly measure of the change in total Canadian nonfarm payroll employment derived from actual, anonymous payroll data of client companies served by ADP Canada. The report, which measures more than two million workers in Canada, is produced by the ADP Research Institute, a specialized group within the company that provides insights around employment trends and workforce strategy.

Each month, the ADP Research Institute issues the ADP Canada National Employment Report as part of the company’s commitment to adding deeper insights into the labour market in Canada and providing businesses, governments and others with a new source of credible and valuable information.  The ADP Canada National Employment Report is broadly distributed to the public each month, free of charge.

For a description of the underlying data and the statistical model used to create this report, please see “ADP Canada National Employment Report: Development Methodology”.

About ADP (NASDAQ: ADP)
Designing better ways to work through cutting-edge products, premium services and exceptional experiences that enable people to reach their full potential.  HR, Talent, Benefits and Payroll. Informed by data and designed for people.  Learn more at ADP.com

For more information about ADP Canada, visit ADP.ca.

ADP, the ADP logo and the ADP Research Institute are registered trademarks of ADP, INC.  All other marks are the property of their respective owners. Copyright © 2020 ADP, INC.  All rights reserved.
 

SOURCE ADP, Inc.

For further information: Keera Hart, Kaiser Lachance Communications, (905) 580-1257, [email protected], www.adp.com

Related Links

www.adp.com

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending