Connect with us

Health

Dentists, teachers disappointed they won’t be prioritized for vaccine in B.C. – Global News

Published

 on


Dentists, bus drivers and teachers are among the essential workers who are disappointed they won’t be given priority to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in British Columbia.

B.C. rolled out its vaccination plan on Friday, revealing that after the most vulnerable groups have been immunized, shots will be given out according to age, with the oldest residents first in line.

That means many people who have not been able to work from home during the pandemic, including grocery store workers, police officers and mail carriers, will have to wait to get the vaccine along with others in their age group.

Read more:
Boost school safety if B.C. teachers won’t get COVID-19 vaccine early, union says

The British Columbia Dental Association has written a letter to Premier John Horgan strongly urging him to include dentists in Stage 2 of the vaccination plan, alongside family doctors and medical specialists.

Story continues below advertisement

“Dentistry is an essential service. More importantly, dental care, including aerosol-generating dental procedures, are provided to patients who cannot wear a mask during treatment,” said association president Dr. Anthony Nadolski in the letter.






1:47
B.C. teachers and grocery store workers won’t get COVID-19 shots early


B.C. teachers and grocery store workers won’t get COVID-19 shots early

“B.C. dentists continue to do everything they can to ensure dental offices are safe for patients and staff. Early access to vaccines will ensure continued access to urgent and emergency dental care.”

Other agencies such as the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have included dentists and dental workers in Stage 2 along with doctors and specialists not directly involved in providing care to COVID-19 patients, Nadolski added.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

More recently, Ontario included dentistry in its second stage because dentists generally provide in-person care and many dental procedures are urgent and cannot be delayed, he said.

The B.C. Ministry of Health did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Sunday.

Story continues below advertisement

The province initially suggested that people delivering essential services such as teachers, grocery store workers and those in law enforcement could be prioritized to get the vaccine.

But when the finalized plan was released on Friday, Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said scientific evidence supports an age-based approach because older populations are at much higher risk of infection and death from COVID-19.


Click to play video 'The immense logistical challenge of B.C.’s mass vaccination program'



1:59
The immense logistical challenge of B.C.’s mass vaccination program


The immense logistical challenge of B.C.’s mass vaccination program

Currently, hospital workers, Indigenous communities and long-term care home residents, staff and essential visitors are among those being vaccinated in Stage 1 of the plan.

Stage 2 will begin in February and include people 80 and over, Indigenous seniors over 65, general practitioners and medical specialists.

Read more:
B.C. prioritizing age and vulnerable people over non medical essential workers in mass COVID-19 immunization plan

Story continues below advertisement

In April, the province will start vaccinating the general public according to five-year age groupings, starting with seniors aged 75 to 79 before moving on to those aged 70 to 74 and so on.

However, Henry added that the approval of more vaccines may mean the province’s plan could be revised to vaccinate essential workers between April and June.

Metro Vancouver bus drivers are “very disappointed” they will not be prioritized while they risk their lives to provide transportation to the public, said Balbir Mann, president of Unifor Local 111.


Click to play video 'B.C.’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan'



3:42
B.C.’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan


B.C.’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan

The union is calling on the provincial government to immediately change the plan and include transit operators in Stage 2.

“We’re basically frontline workers, taking people to work and grocery shopping. Our members are real heroes,” said Mann. “They’re putting their lives in front of this to help out the general public.”

Story continues below advertisement

Teachers are also disappointed there is no prioritization for front-line workers who have kept schools, public services and the economy open, said B.C. Teachers Federation President Teri Mooring.

“However, the vaccine supply limit is beyond our control and those among us who are most vulnerable of death and serious illness must be vaccinated first,” she said in a statement.

READ MORE: 57% of British Columbians give low score to province’s vaccine rollout plan: poll

Hopefully more vaccines are approved and the immunization strategy will be appropriately adjusted and accelerated, she said.

Mooring added if teachers are not prioritized for vaccines, the government must take immediate action to improve safety measures in schools, including mandatory masks, better physical distancing and ventilation upgrades.

“There is no denying that teachers are stressed, anxious and even afraid. We do not have the layers of protection in our schools that exist in other environments.”

© 2021 The Canadian Press

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Computer programmer shares workaround to Alberta COVID-19 vaccine booking issues – Global News

Published

 on


UPDATE: As of 7 p.m. Wednesday, it appeared the website had been changed and the workaround was no longer effective.

Hundreds of people said they were able to book COVID-19 vaccination appointments for their loved ones Wednesday thanks to a workaround published online by a computer programmer.

It all started Wednesday morning when Kory Mathewson‘s family logged on to the Alberta Health Services website to book appointments for Grandma Mufty and Grandpa Bill.

The first appointment was booked after a few tries but getting the second was more difficult.

Like so many other Albertans, once logging onto the website and putting in the postal code, the website stopped working for Mathewson.

Read more:
Alberta COVID-19 vaccine booking site ‘experiencing very high volumes’ as appointments open to those 75 and older

Story continues below advertisement

Being a computer programmer and developer, Mathewson checked out the coding of the website.

He discovered that he could alter the code and bypass the postal code section, going straight to the patient information form.

By doing so, Mathewson was quickly able to book an appointment.

Upon getting the confirmation, he describes feeling immediate relief.

“It’s exactly that. It’s like: ‘Finally! I don’t have to worry.’”

After double checking the process and simplifying it for a less tech-savvy audience, Mathewson posted the workaround to Twitter in hopes of helping others do the same.

“It was like, ‘OK, how do we make this as easy as possible for people?’ You know, people that don’t know code,” Mathewson told Global News.

Story continues below advertisement

Within hours, hundreds of Albertans responded saying the hack had worked for them and they were also able to book appointments for their loved ones.

However, as of 7 p.m. it appeared the website had been changed and the workaround was no longer effective.

In a series of messages on Twitter Wednesday night, AHS said it had “put additional queuing software in place to help manage the volume of users on the AHS COVID-19 immunization booking tool.

“This software will indicate an estimated wait time, and where each individual is in the booking queue to give people the option to continue booking, or to try again later.”

As of 7 p.m., 43,000 eligible seniors 75 and over had booked appointments using the immunization tool and 811 since it went live at 8 a.m., AHS said.

A spokesperson for AHS told Global News that the queueing system has “nothing to do with the workaround” shared on Twitter.

Story continues below advertisement

A Twitter user created a video walking through the steps to show others how to do it in a visual way.

“It was a real community effort and all the different people kind of pulled together to make this solution happen,” said Mathewson.

Read more:
Albertans 75 and older can book COVID-19 vaccine appointments starting 8 a.m. Wednesday

The former Edmontonian believes Alberta Health Services could use the tool to fix the delays for all Albertans.

“In my opinion, this seems like a relatively straightforward fix.”

“I’m more than happy to be connected with the people at AHS to make this happen,” Mathewson said. “Part of the reason that I’m here is to sort of communicate that there are great developers like myself that are ready to help make this possible and make this as frictionless and as easy as possible for all Albertans.”


Click to play video 'Alberta Health Minister says AHS is ‘fixing the the problems’ with COVID-19 vaccine booking system'



1:11
Alberta Health Minister says AHS is ‘fixing the the problems’ with COVID-19 vaccine booking system


Alberta Health Minister says AHS is ‘fixing the the problems’ with COVID-19 vaccine booking system

In a statement, Alberta Health Services confirmed the appointments booked using the workaround were official but that “this is not a permanent solution.”

Story continues below advertisement

“The AHS online immunization booking tool continues to experience extremely high volumes and our IT teams are working to find a way to make the process as fast and efficient as possible for everyone.”

Read more:
Should all seniors get the COVID-19 vaccine before essential workers?

In the meantime, Mathewson and his brother Kyle say they’ll continue to help others looking to book appointments.

“I did this for my grandparents but really, this is for all the grandparents of Alberta,” said Mathewson.

“There’s a lot of people that want this and want to be safe. And hopefully this gets them one step closer and takes away that, ‘when is it going to happen?’”


Mufty and Bill Mathewson.


Courtesy/Kory Mathewson

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Moderna begins studying potential COVID-19 vaccine booster targetting variant first detected in South Africa – CBC.ca

Published

 on


Drug manufacturer Moderna says it will begin testing a variant-specific version of its COVID-19 vaccine that would target the B1351 variant first detected in South Africa.  

The company has previously reported that its original two-dose vaccine — already approved for use in Canada — appears to provide protection against the B117 variant first detected in the U.K., as well as the B1351 variant, though its own research suggests it may be less effective against the latter

The company says it will study the B1351 variant-specific vaccine both as a potential booster to the original COVID-19 vaccine and as a standalone for people who have not yet received a vaccine at all. 

It will study the outcomes of three different scenarios:

  • A single shot of the B1351 variant-specific vaccine. 
  • A shot combining both the original vaccine and the B1351 variant-specific booster. 
  • A booster of the original vaccine, added to the original two-dose version. 

The B1351-specific vaccine will undergo clinical trials at the National Institutes for Health in the U.S.

“As we seek to defeat COVID-19, we must be vigilant and proactive as new variants of SARS-CoV-2 emerge,” said Stéphane Bancel, CEO of Moderna in a statement. 

“Leveraging the flexibility of our mRNA platform, we are moving quickly to test updates to the vaccines that address emerging variants of the virus in the clinic.”

Moderna reported last month that its vaccine was essentially as effective against the B117 variant as it was to prior variants.

But it found there was a reduction in its neutralizing ability against the B1351 variant. 

Neutralizing antibodies are one of the body’s immune responses to control viral infections.

South Africa paused its rollout of the AstraZeneca vaccine after data from a small trial suggested the vaccine did not protect against mild to moderate illness from the B1351 variant now dominant in the country.

Johnson & Johnson, Oxford-AstraZeneca and Novavax have all looked at how their vaccines perform against the B1351 variant.

WATCH | Doctor calls for aggressive action to target COVID-19 variants:

In an interview on Rosemary Barton Live, Dr. Brooks Fallis speaks out against reopening plans in several provinces as officials study potential implications of the spread of new COVID-19 variants. 8:46

Variants confirmed around the world

The B1351 variant has been detected in at least 40 countries while the B117, first detected in the U.K., has now been identified in 80. Both have been found in Canada. 

Health Canada would need to approve any booster or new vaccine against the B1351 variant before it could be administered here.

The prime minister confirmed Wednesday that Moderna will deliver the two million doses of COVID-19 vaccine it is contracted to provide Canada by the end of March. 

Justin Trudeau said Canada expects to receive 460,000 doses the week of March 8 and 840,000 doses beginning  March 22.

That’s in addition to the 518,000 Moderna shots that have been administered in this country already and the 168,000 doses that are set to arrive this week.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Moderna to begin trial of new COVID vaccine to address virus variant first found in South Africa – USA TODAY

Published

 on



Karen Weintraub
 
| USA TODAY

play
Show Caption

Hide Caption

Mobile clinic helps distribute COVID-19 vaccine at DC church

In the District today, a pilot program using churches to help distribute the coronavirus vaccine was introduced.

Fox – 5 DC, Fox – 5 DC

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Moderna, which makes one of the two authorized COVID-19 vaccines, is set to launch a clinical trial of a new vaccine designed to combat a variant of the virus, the company announced Wednesday. 

The company says it has produced enough of its variant-specific candidate vaccine, called mRNA-1273.351 to begin testing it in people.

Any change to address variants, which other vaccine makers also are working on, would need to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 

In a study published last week, Moderna showed that blood from people who received the current vaccine includes neutralizing antibodies against the major known variants. But only one-sixth of their antibodies were protective against the B.1.351 variant of the virus, which originated in South Africa, and which is the target of its new vaccine. 

It is not clear whether this reduced antibody level is sufficient to protect people against symptomatic or serious cases of COVID-19 from this new variant.

That’s why “out of an abundance of caution,” the company said in a news release it has begun pursuing two possible strategies against the variant: giving people a booster dose of the original vaccine to increase antibody levels, and developing two variant-specific vaccines, which could be given instead of the original one.

It will test several variations of a booster, the company said, including a single, low-dose shot of the variant-specific vaccine; a shot that includes both the original vaccine and the variant-specific one; and a third low-dose version of the original vaccine. 

According to FDA guidance, the company plans to evaluate the safety and immune effects of these approaches in people who have not been vaccinated against COVID-19 and in those who received the original vaccine, mRNA-1273.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease will help lead the clinical studies to see if mRNA-1273.351 can boost immunity against the variant. In its announcement Wednesday, the company said it already has shipped sufficient doses of this variant-specific vaccine needed for testing. 

“As we seek to defeat COVID-19, we must be vigilant and proactive as new variants of SARS-CoV-2 emerge,” Stéphane Bancel, Moderna’s CEO, said in a prepared statement, referring to the virus that causes COVID-19. “We are moving quickly to test updates to the vaccines that address emerging variants of the virus in the clinic.”

The lower doses hopefully will work for the booster, Bancel said, allowing the company to stretch its limited vaccine supply.

Other leaders in the COVID-19 vaccine effort – Pfizer-BioNTech, Novavax, Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca-Oxford University – also have said they are working on new versions of their vaccines or boosters to increase their protection.

A third vaccine on the way: One-dose J&J COVID-19 vaccine meets criteria as safe and effective, FDA report finds

It’s not yet clear whether a booster shot, which amps up the immune system, will be enough to protect against a new variant, or if an entirely new vaccine is needed.

Moderna is the first to release details about its effort. 

In a Congressional subcommittee meeting Tuesday, Pfizer’s chief business officer, John Young, said his company is “preparing to respond quickly to initiate a study to investigate the effectiveness of a third booster of our vaccine in trial participants who have already received two doses.”

He said Pfizer is discussing trial designs with the FDA. “We will fight every step of the way until a devastating pandemic is under control,” he said.

The Moderna vaccine, like the Pfizer-BioNTech one, is based on mRNA technology in which a simple change to the code will enable the recipient to make a slightly different protein. That’s why they were both made so quickly last year, once it became clear which protein on the SARS-CoV-2 virus they should target. By getting the body to produce a protein from the virus, the vaccine trains the immune system to recognize that protein and immediately attack if the recipient is exposed to the virus.

On Monday, the FDA laid out guidelines for companies that want to change their vaccines to adapt to new variants. They will not be required to start from scratch, running gigantic clinical trials over many months as they have to win FDA authorization.

Instead, as with the flu vaccine, which is altered every year to cope with changing strains, COVID-19 vaccine versions will be tested in smaller groups to confirm safety and to examine immune responses for effectiveness.

Lab studies and some real-world evidence suggests that current vaccines will remain effective against a variant called B.1.1.7, which originated in the United Kingdom.

Lessons from the UK: COVID-19 variant found in UK spreads ‘like wildfire.’ British experts fear what will happen if US won’t lock down

But they may not all work against B.1.351. Studies of AstraZeneca-Oxford University’s collaborative vaccine showed it was barely protective at all against B.1.351 in South Africa, and that country has passed on using doses of the vaccine.

Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine does seem to provide some protection there, and lab studies suggest that Pfizer-BioNTech’s vaccine, like Moderna’s, would continue to provide some protection against that variant, though it’s not clear how much.

Even if it proves unnecessary to reconfigure vaccines to fight the B.1.351 variant, there may be another that comes along that will require a new vaccine, public health officials have said.

New variants of the virus will continue to emerge as COVID-19 continues to infect people across the globe. The only way to stop these variants is to reduce the spread of the virus, public health officials, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, America’s top infectious disease doctor, have said.

“It really is the time to study effects of booster doses to new, emerging viral variants,” Dr. Jesse Goodman, a professor of Medicine at Georgetown University and former chief scientist with the FDA, said in a Wednesday call with media.

Studies are needed to show whether people respond as expected to booster doses, and whether they cause any concerning safety problems. 

And even if the virus doesn’t escape protection from current vaccines, people might need boosters eventually, Goodman said.

“We don’t know,” he said, “how long immunity will last from these vaccines.” 

Contact Karen Weintraub at kweintraub@usatoday.

Health and patient safety coverage at USA TODAY is made possible in part by a grant from the Masimo Foundation for Ethics, Innovation and Competition in Healthcare. The Masimo Foundation does not provide editorial input.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending