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Donald Trump justify his social media crackdown

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“Imagine if your local phone companies tried to edit or censor what you said. Social media companies have far more power,” Trump said.

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Think about it for one second and, maybe, the comparison makes some sense. Think about it any longer and you can immediately see this isn’t even an apples-and-oranges comparison. It’s more like an apples-and-spaceships comparison. Because the comparison makes absolutely no sense.
To explain exactly how and why, let’s take Trump up on his premise. Let’s say that a local telecommunications company did censor or edit a conversation you were having over the phone with a friend. What that would mean is that your friend would not get the exact message you were seeking to send. They would get some sort of altered message.
That’s bad! We can all agree on that! If I want to call my wife and tell her I love her and the phone company turns “I love you” into “I like you,” well, I might have a problem!
Like I said, the Trump comparison makes sense — for like one second.
But now let’s assume the opposite. The phone company does NOT edit or censor what you say. And what you say is something like: “Did you know that wearing a mask actually makes you more likely to get coronavirus?”
That is, of course, not true. But by not censoring your phone call, the only person you spread that false information to was the person the other end of the line. Now, could that person then go and tell five more people about how wearing a mask actually increases your chances of getting Covid-19? Yes! Of course. And if they were very diligent and spent a LOT of time on the phone over the next few days, they might could even spread that falsehood to 200 people. (Like I said, you’d have to spent a lot of time on the phone.)
Now imagine that the same person who made the initial phone call to one other person instead decided to tweet out that falsehood about masks. And that person happened to have, say, 80.4 million Twitter followers. Or even 80,000. Or even 8,000.
With the push of a button — literally! — that single person could spread the untruth about masks to 8,000 or 80,000 or even 80 million people. And then those people could retweet the falsehood to their dozens or hundreds or thousands or millions of followers. Within five minutes (or less), a single person tweeting out a falsehood could virtually ensure that the falsehood had been seen by hundreds of millions of people.
Do you have any idea how long it would take you to call 100 million people and tell them a single falsehood? A looooooooooot longer than five minutes.
See? The comparison makes no sense.
The legal limits of Trump's executive order on social media
Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and the like are public platforms. Anyone who wants to follow, say, Lady Gaga or me — very similar! — on Instagram can do it. A phone call (or phone company) is a private platform. I can’t sign on to listen to your call — or you mine — just because I want to.
The reach and immediacy of social media platforms then makes them different than a phone company. A lot different. And so, what works to regulate a phone call is not the same thing that works to regulate a tweet.
If someone like Trump is allowed to tweet things that are demonstrably untrue without any pushback from any social media platform, he can erode the very concept of truth in American society without anything more than a few taps on his phone. Try doing that on a phone call.

Source: – CNN

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Edited By Harry Miller

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Media Advisory – Government Of Canada to Make Announcement Related to Housing in St. Catharines – Canada NewsWire

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ST. CATHARINES, ON, July 3, 2020 /CNW/ – The federal government will be making an announcement related to housing in St. Catharines.

Media are invited to join Chris Bittle, Member of Parliament for St. Catharines, on behalf of The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development.

Date:

July 6, 2020



Time:

10:00 a.m



Location:

176 Oakdale Avenue

St. Catharines, ON

Note:

Media are asked to wear sturdy shoes and a medical or cloth mask.

In the interest of ensuring adherence to the 10-person limit on gatherings, media are requested to RSVP to Wilbur McLean at [email protected].

SOURCE Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

For further information: Wilbur McLean, CMHC, 416-218-3331, [email protected]

Related Links

www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca

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In shake-up, UK government plans televised media briefings – Toronto Star

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LONDON – British Prime Minister Boris Johnson says his government will introduce White House-style televised media briefings, in a shake-up to the traditional system of political communication.

For years, political journalists have been briefed off-camera but on the record by the prime minister’s official spokespeople, who are civil servants rather than political appointees. The briefings usually take place twice a day, though during the U.K.’s coronavirus lockdown they have been held once a day by conference call.

The government said Friday that it plans to replace the afternoon briefing with a televised event hosted by a professional broadcaster. The morning briefing will continue in the current format. The change will take effect later this year.

Johnson told LBC radio that the government’s daily televised coronavirus news conferences had been a success. The briefings involving ministers and scientists were held daily between March and late June.

“People have liked a more direct, detailed information from the government about what is going on,” Johnson said.

“We do think that people want direct engagement and want stuff from us, and so we’re going to have a go at that.”

Johnson said he would “pop up from time to time” at the briefings.

Viewers around the world are used to seeing televised White House briefings by the U.S. president’s press secretary, though these have become sporadic under the Trump administration.

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Take coronavirus seriously, Iranian state media urge people – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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(Reuters) – Total coronavirus cases rose to 235,429 in Iran on Friday, with 154 deaths in the past 24 hours bringing the death toll to 11,260, authorities said as the country tries to fend off new infections after easing its lockdown restrictions.

Eight out of 31 provinces are considered in a red status, meaning the epidemic has been on the rise, while seven, including the province where Tehran is located, are on alert as the virus is still a threat, Health Ministry spokeswoman Sima Sadat Lari said on state TV.

State television is airing warnings such as “Coronavirus is very close” and “Let’s take the coronavirus danger seriously”.

Authorities launched a campaign on June 27 to motivate a reluctant public to use face masks. Reporters interviewing people in the streets chastise those who are not wearing them.

The country, which has had the worst coronavirus outbreak in the Middle East, has seen a sharp increase in infections and deaths since restrictions were gradually lifted from mid-April.

It has been divided up into white, yellow, and red regions based on the number of infections and deaths.

(Editing by Frances Kerry)

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