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Extended family for Katheryn Boudreau included St. Joseph’s Art Studios – Chemainus Valley Courier

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Members of the St. Joseph’s Art Studios in Chemainus were part of Katheryn Boudreau’s extended family.

Boudreau and husband Allan, along with pilot Alex Bahlsen, died in that plane crash on Gabriola Island Dec. 10. A memorial service for the Boudreaus was held Friday afternoon at St. Mary’s Church in Ladysmith.

Katheryn Boudreau, also active in the St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, was one of the original eight artists in the studio created after St. Joseph’s School closed.

Dennis Brown of Ladysmith has a workshop upstairs in the building and Boudreau’s was located downstairs. All the artists, even if they didn’t know each other well, would cross paths for meetings or to converse about various projects.

“She was a very quiet artful person,” said Brown. “She had a very calm spirit.

“We’ve all got a little hole in our hearts because she’s missing.”

While the investigation into the crash continued, the identities of the Saltair couple were revealed by the couple’s children. The BC Coroners Service had not offically released their names, but the Boudreau children knew it was them and approached the Gabriola Sounder newspaper to reveal details of their parents’ lives.

“It’s safe to say those in the Cowichan Valley are aware of it,” reasoned son Jeffrey. “They can put two and two together. We’ve had a lot of support.”

Condolences poured in for the family via the Courier’s Facebook page after the Boudreaus’ deaths became public.

Absolutely heart breaking news,” wrote Krystal Liimatta. “I had the honour of working for them for a few years when they had first started out the Island Hothouse in Saltair. Great people.”

“Katheryn and Allan curled at the Duncan Curling Club,” noted Lara Stuart. “This is devastating news. My heart breaks for their families and friends.”

“I chatted with Katheryn just days before they were to fly down to Cabo,” noted Gunnell Borge. “She was so excited. It is so surreal they died. So sad for their family. Treasure your memories.”

Katheryn Boudreau and husband Allan died in the plane crash on Gabriola Island Dec. 10. (Photo submitted)

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‘Gratitude’ art exhibit celebrates essential workers – MassLive.com

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Ashfield artist Robert Masla is grateful for essential workers who are often overlooked but are no less essential to a whole, functioning, prosperous human society.

So he has put together a solo exhibit of recent oil and watercolor paintings, “Gratitude: The Unrecognized Essential Workers Series,” that will be on view online beginning Oct. 1 or at the R. Michelson Galleries in Northampton.

“Most of us are acutely aware of the essential workers who are obvious to us during these challenging pandemic times — health care workers, doctors, nurses, etc.,” he said. “Hopefully this time has also brought a heightened awareness and appreciation to those that though providing these essential services, they remain unrecognized in their value to society at large.”

He listed teachers, service persons, postal workers, immigrant farmers, artists, musicians, writers, EMT’s, custodians, poets, social workers, dancers, repair persons, ” etc. etc.,” adding that “perhaps the most impassioned of these, (and unpaid), are the ‘Defenders of a Real Democracy’ who are formed by all of the diverse members and occupations of society, depicted in the paintings ‘Take a Knee: Rural Communities in Solidarity with Black Lives Matter’ (oil 22”x72″) and ‘The 30th of May: Persecution of the Defenders of Real Democracy’ (oil 48″x72″) that are on display in this exhibition at the R. Michelson Galleries.”

A full-time professional artist whose exhibition history extends over 40 years, Masla’s canvases, murals and portraits can be found in the United States and in Mexico in numerous public and private collections. His work has been featured in solo and group exhibitions in both countries and in various books and publications.

Throughout his more than 40-year career, his work has moved from visionary and symbolic paintings, to landscapes, particularly from, but not limited to the areas around his homes and studios in western Massachusetts and Mexico. His work has moved from trompe-l’oeil still lifes to abstract collages to portraits to murals. These are executed in a variety of methods and a variety of media — oil paint, alkyd, watercolor, gouache, acrylic, digital collage, charcoal, water soluble graphite, sumi-e ink.

“I do not call myself a watercolorist or ‘oilist’ or ‘portraitist or ‘landscapeist’ or either impressionist, surrealist, realist or abstractionist,” he said.

Sometimes he has been asked what is his favorite medium, and he replies, “Paint.”

Although Masla makes a living as an artist, art to him is more than a product:

“It is a process as well, it is also a way of life, of seeing, being and doing – of connecting with myself and with the universe around me.”

Art, like life, is not easily defined, he said; it is “a reflection and part of the great mystery we call the universe, (some would call God). Back in the ’70s, when I was constantly grappling with such existential questions, I coined the term SpiritRealism, to refer to artwork and a lifestyle that reflected these concerns, and had no ‘stylistic boundaries.’”

As an artist, Masla’s intention always has been to use his work as a spiritual practice, a form of ritual and meditation, a practice that ultimately helps him transcend his limited ego and reach a place of non-judgmental awareness and openness. “It grounds me in the present moment so I can connect with the creative flow of nature that surrounds me and is me. We are all a part of creation unfolding, and I see my role as an artist to play my part as co-creator, and hopefully help others make that connection through my work,” he said. “We all go about our work and our lives, hopefully trying to be present, aware and compassionate. In my case, a lot of that time is spent making art, and if I am still enough, present enough, I am able to connect – to be in the place of my essence — open awareness — that is where spirit is, and you catch it on the in breath, aha, the in-spiration.”

Masla graduated from The School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts University with a bachelor of fine arts degree and diploma in painting in 1979 and received a master’s in fine arts in painting and art history from The City College of New York in 1986.

His exhibit, “Gratitude: The Unrecognized Essential Workers Series,” will be available online beginning Oct. 1 or at the gallery (masks and social distancing required). Masla will be at the gallery Oct. 3, from 3 to 8 p.m. and Oct. 4 from 1 to 8 p.m. and by appointment.

The gallery is at 132 Main St., Northampton.

For more information, go to MaslaFineArt.com or RMichelson.com.

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NYC Startup Maireann Makes Fine Art Collections More Accessible – The Ritz Herald

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Maireann is a New York-based Fine Art marketplace that sells top-quality signed and limited edition prints. They launched on August 15, 2020. The fine art prints they sell are targeted at consumers desiring to purchase high-value art but cannot afford outrageously-expensive collections. Maireann wants to ultimately make quality art that will appreciate in value more readily available.

Nebulous I – Photographed by Mario De La Isla. Yosemite National Park, California, 2015

“Maireann helps photographers survive and make a living, especially during these trying times,” exclaimed Creative Director Freddie Leiba who’s worked with some of the top names in art and fashion like Andy Warhol, Irving Penn, Annie Leibovitz, Albert Watson, Joseph Chen, Helmut Newton, Horst P. Horst, and Francesco Scavullo to name a few. “I’ve seen many Photographers struggle to find a good marketplace to sell to art collectors,” added Leiba, ” Maireann helps solve this problem.”

Says New York Fashion Photographer Joseph Chen, “The series Forme Féminine et Sensualité is an ongoing study I have been working on and off for the last 10 years, it revolves around the intricate relationship between sensuality and the female form. Maireann is a great platform to share my work to the world, it also gives me the opportunity to do what I feel, which is sometimes hard to do on commissioned advertising jobs.” Supermodel Megan Irminger, who worked with Chen over the years, adds, “I think it’s a beautiful piece illustrating the light that women bring to this world.” The series Forme Féminine et Sensualité by Chen is sold exclusively with Maireann.

Maireann accomplishes their mission by lowering the cost of the art to the consumer while offering a majority of the sales price to the artist. Maireann keeps a very low percentage of each print sold in comparison to other marketplaces. Maireann even offers free shipping on all orders $200 and above.

“It’s been a pleasure to work with Maireann to sell my photography,” added photographer Mario De La Isla. “Previously, I’ve struggled to find buyers who would appreciate my limited-edition prints. But with the help of Maireann, I’m able to focus more on creating art than worrying about selling my work.” De La Isla is a veteran photographer for National Geographic.

Lastly, Maireann is currently on the lookout for artists that they, themselves, bring a unique point of view, to help showcase fresh exceptional talent to the art world.

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New art piece in Lacombe acknowledges roots of the land and reconciliation – rdnewsnow.com

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“It is a metal sculpture of two rough grouse, with two logs; the female is sitting on one log and the male is landing at the end of the other,” explains Maureen MacKenzie, community services executive assistant with The City of Lacombe. “It was created to represent the affinity between rough grouse, but also that people have for one another. It also represents the two communities and local First Nations.”

According to a release, grouse was an imported food source for settlers and Indigenous peoples when bison populations dwindled across the prairies. The piece also pays homage to settler and Indigenous communities living and working together across Canada’s west.

MacKenzie adds The City had a robust anti-racism program planned earlier this year, but once again COVID-19 caused its postponement. The program was meant for large groups and would’ve included the blanket exercise, a 60s Scoop exhibition, and other workshops.

“The last census in 2016 indicated we have over 800 residents of Lacombe who are Indigenous, which is almost 10 per cent of our population, so it’s really important we show we’re willing to walk the walk,” MacKenzie says. “We as a city want to embrace all of our cultures, and in this instance, with truth and reconciliation in mind, our plan is to host those workshops eventually, and that’s our way of saying we’re taking action on inclusion and racism.”

‘Miweyihtowin’ was created at a cost of $18,000.

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