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Extra, extra! Google to pay publishers $1bn over 3 years for news – Al Jazeera English

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Alphabet’s Google plans to pay $1bn to publishers globally for their news over the next three years, its CEO said on Thursday, a step that could help it win over a powerful group amid heightened regulatory scrutiny worldwide.

News publishers have long fought the world’s most popular internet search engine for compensation for using their content, with European media groups leading the charge.

CEO Sundar Pichai said the new product called Google News Showcase will launch first in Germany, where it has signed up German newspapers including Der Spiegel, Stern, Die Zeit, and in Brazil with Folha de S.Paulo, Band and Infobae.

It will be rolled out in Belgium, India, the Netherlands and other countries. About 200 publishers in Argentina, Australia, the United Kingdom, Brazil, Canada and Germany have signed up to the product.

“This financial commitment – our biggest to date – will pay publishers to create and curate high-quality content for a different kind of online news experience,” Pichai said in a blog post.

Google parent Alphabet reported a net profit of $34.3bn on revenue of almost $162bn last year.

The product, which allows publishers to pick and present their stories, will launch on Google News on Android devices and eventually on Apple devices.

“This approach is distinct from our other news products because it leans on the editorial choices individual publishers make about which stories to show readers and how to present them,” Pichai said.

German publisher the Spiegel Group welcomed the project.

“With News Showcase and the new integration of editorial content like from Spiegel, Google shows that they are serious about supporting quality journalism in Germany. We are happy to be part of it from the start,” said Stefan Ottlitz, managing director of the Spiegel Group.

News Corp, which has urged European Union antitrust regulators to act against Google, was equally enthusiastic.

“We applaud Google’s recognition of a premium for premium journalism and the understanding that the editorial eco-system has been dysfunctional, verging on dystopian. There are complex negotiations ahead but the principle and the precedent are now established,” its CEO Robert Thomson said in a statement.

The European Publishers Council (EPC), whose members include News UK, The Guardian, Pearson, The New York Times and Schibsted, however, was critical.

“By launching a product, they [Google] can dictate terms and conditions, undermine legislation designed to create conditions for a fair negotiation, while claiming they are helping to fund news production,” said EPC Executive Director Angela Mills Wade.

Google is negotiating with French publishers, among its most vocal critics, while Australia wants to force it and Facebook to share advertising revenue with local media groups.

Google’s funding for news organisations has frustrated other internet publishers, such as weather websites and recipe tools, which say Google has hurt their revenue.

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The TSX Composite Index Fell Almost 5%: Is the Stock Market Crash 2.0 Here? – The Motley Fool Canada

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For a long time, billionaire investors like George Soros and Warren Buffett have been saying that a second stock market crash is in the making. The TSX Composite Index surged 30% between April 1 and September 1 after falling 34% in March. The market crashed when the COVID-19 pandemic struck, and the market rallied on the back of the government stimulus package.

There were fears that the second wave of pandemic after the reopening of the economy would repeat the March sell-off. These fears are materializing. The increasing COVID-19 cases in the U.S., Canada, and Europe are recreating conditions of a lockdown. But this time, there won’t be a complete nationwide lockdown but tighter travel restrictions. Governments are better prepared to handle a coronavirus outbreak than they were in March.

Is the stock market crash 2.0 here? 

George Soros stated that the free money coming from the fiscal stimulus package created a liquidity bubble, which drove stock valuations to new highs. When the valuations are high, there is more downside than upside.

The stock market was already bearish when the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) delayed Canada Recovery Benefit (CRB) payments because of a technical glitch. The liquidity coming from the stimulus package was drying up. The COVID-19 resurgence accelerated the bearish tone. The TSX Composite Index has fallen 4.7% in the last three trading days and 6.2% in 13 trading days. In the March-sell off, the Index fell 11.8% in three trading days and 18.7% in 13 trading days.

The potential of another wave of pandemic hurt Air Canada (TSX:AC) and Suncor Energy (TSX:SU)(NYSE:SU) the most. Their stock prices fell 11.6% and 10.2%, respectively, to their March lows. Even virus stocks like ShopifyLightspeed POS, and Kinaxis dipped single digits this week.

Companies are releasing their third-quarter earnings. The TSX Composite Index decline was partially offset by earnings surprises. For instance, better-than-expected third-quarter earnings sent RioCan REIT stock up 2.46%.

Stocks in the red

AC and Suncor are already struggling with sluggish air travel and oil demand. Another wave of tighter restrictions dampened any hopes of a recovery this year. The stock price momentum of AC and Suncor was range-bound since the pandemic. The recent dip pushed their stock prices to the lower end of their price range. AC stock has found support at $15. But Suncor stock lost its support and fell below $15. Warren Buffett exited airline stocks but retained his investment in Suncor in April.

A prolonged sector weakness leads to consolidation. The oil and gas industry has been in crisis for six years, and the pandemic has made things worse. Moreover, interest rates are near zero, creating an opportunity to acquire companies with strong assets at an attractive price.

The Canadian oil and gas industry saw its first mega-merger; Cenovus Energy agreed to acquire Husky Energy for $3.8 billion. Analysts believe that this could be the beginning of a mergers and acquisition supercycle. Suncor is in a far better position than most oil and gas companies because of its integrated business model. Its third-quarter earnings gave a snapshot of its liquidity, which will help it withstand crisis and operating efficiency that will help it return to profit when the oil price recovers to US$45/barrel.

The airline industry is already consolidated. It might undergo further consolidation, or some airlines might declare bankruptcy. For instance, AC slashed the Transat A.T. bid price by more than 70% to $190 million. But this deal could fall in jeopardy if AC faces the risk of bankruptcy.

What should you do in this stock market pullback? 

The recent dip in the stock market has created an opportunity to buy post-pandemic stocks at discount. Suncor has growth potential, but its growth comes with risks. There are better stocks like Enbridge and RioCan, which have dividend yields of over 8.86% and 9.97%, respectively. These stocks are also reporting profits and positive cash flows. The stock market pullback has created an opportunity to lock such high-dividend yields for a lifetime.

Here are some more quality stocks to buy in the recent stock market pullback.

The 10 Best Stocks to Buy This Month

Renowned Canadian investor Iain Butler just named 10 stocks for Canadians to buy TODAY. So if you’re tired of reading about other people getting rich in the stock market, this might be a good day for you.
Because Motley Fool Canada is offering a full 65% off the list price of their top stock-picking service, plus a complete membership fee back guarantee on what you pay for the service. Simply click here to discover how you can take advantage of this.

Click Here to Learn More Today!


Fool contributor Puja Tayal has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. Tom Gardner owns shares of Shopify. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Enbridge, Shopify, and Shopify. The Motley Fool owns shares of Lightspeed POS Inc. The Motley Fool recommends KINAXIS INC.

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Canadian economic growth cools to 1.2% in August – CBC.ca

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The Canadian economy grew in August as real gross domestic product rose by 1.2 per cent in August, Statistics Canada reported Friday. 

That marked the fourth straight month of growth following the steepest drops on record back in March and April amid pandemic lockdowns. August’s figure was down from the 3.1 per cent expansion seen in July.

The August number was still ahead of what forecasters had been expecting. According to financial data firm Refinitiv, economists had been predicting growth of 0.9 per cent for the month.

Despite the recent string of growth, overall economic activity is still about five per cent below February’s pre-pandemic level, Statistics Canada said.

September growth is forecast

Preliminary information from Statistics Canada indicates real GDP was up 0.7 per cent in September, with increases seen in the manufacturing and public sectors, as well as in mining, quarrying and oil and gas extraction.

“This advanced estimate points to an approximate 10 per cent increase in real GDP in the third quarter of 2020,” Statistics Canada said. Back in the second quarter, the country’s GDP shrank by 11.5 per cent in the three-month period between April and June. 

Assuming the economy contracts in October and November as a result of a resurgence of coronavirus cases, fourth-quarter GDP looks likely to undershoot the Bank of Canada’s “tepid” forecast for a seasonally adjusted annual rate of one per cent, said CIBC Capital Markets senior economist Royce Mendes.

“It appears that the economy was slowing more than expected heading into the fourth quarter, and the most likely outcome now suggests that GDP barely advanced during the period,” Mendes said in a commentary.

BMO chief economist Doug Porter said the way forward has been deeply clouded by the second wave and renewed restrictions, so growth will cool considerably in the fourth quarter.

“However, we suspect that with ongoing massive fiscal support, less restrictions than earlier, and, simply, that consumers and businesses have learned to operate in this new environment, the late-year setback should be relatively mild,” Porter said. “In fact, we continue to expect modest growth overall for [the fourth quarter].”

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The TSX Composite Index Fell Almost 5%: Is the Stock Market Crash 2.0 Here? – The Motley Fool Canada

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For a long time, billionaire investors like George Soros and Warren Buffett have been saying that a second stock market crash is in the making. The TSX Composite Index surged 30% between April 1 and September 1 after falling 34% in March. The market crashed when the COVID-19 pandemic struck, and the market rallied on the back of the government stimulus package.

There were fears that the second wave of pandemic after the reopening of the economy would repeat the March sell-off. These fears are materializing. The increasing COVID-19 cases in the U.S., Canada, and Europe are recreating conditions of a lockdown. But this time, there won’t be a complete nationwide lockdown but tighter travel restrictions. Governments are better prepared to handle a coronavirus outbreak than they were in March.

Is the stock market crash 2.0 here? 

George Soros stated that the free money coming from the fiscal stimulus package created a liquidity bubble, which drove stock valuations to new highs. When the valuations are high, there is more downside than upside.

The stock market was already bearish when the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) delayed Canada Recovery Benefit (CRB) payments because of a technical glitch. The liquidity coming from the stimulus package was drying up. The COVID-19 resurgence accelerated the bearish tone. The TSX Composite Index has fallen 4.7% in the last three trading days and 6.2% in 13 trading days. In the March-sell off, the Index fell 11.8% in three trading days and 18.7% in 13 trading days.

The potential of another wave of pandemic hurt Air Canada (TSX:AC) and Suncor Energy (TSX:SU)(NYSE:SU) the most. Their stock prices fell 11.6% and 10.2%, respectively, to their March lows. Even virus stocks like ShopifyLightspeed POS, and Kinaxis dipped single digits this week.

Companies are releasing their third-quarter earnings. The TSX Composite Index decline was partially offset by earnings surprises. For instance, better-than-expected third-quarter earnings sent RioCan REIT stock up 2.46%.

Stocks in the red

AC and Suncor are already struggling with sluggish air travel and oil demand. Another wave of tighter restrictions dampened any hopes of a recovery this year. The stock price momentum of AC and Suncor was range-bound since the pandemic. The recent dip pushed their stock prices to the lower end of their price range. AC stock has found support at $15. But Suncor stock lost its support and fell below $15. Warren Buffett exited airline stocks but retained his investment in Suncor in April.

A prolonged sector weakness leads to consolidation. The oil and gas industry has been in crisis for six years, and the pandemic has made things worse. Moreover, interest rates are near zero, creating an opportunity to acquire companies with strong assets at an attractive price.

The Canadian oil and gas industry saw its first mega-merger; Cenovus Energy agreed to acquire Husky Energy for $3.8 billion. Analysts believe that this could be the beginning of a mergers and acquisition supercycle. Suncor is in a far better position than most oil and gas companies because of its integrated business model. Its third-quarter earnings gave a snapshot of its liquidity, which will help it withstand crisis and operating efficiency that will help it return to profit when the oil price recovers to US$45/barrel.

The airline industry is already consolidated. It might undergo further consolidation, or some airlines might declare bankruptcy. For instance, AC slashed the Transat A.T. bid price by more than 70% to $190 million. But this deal could fall in jeopardy if AC faces the risk of bankruptcy.

What should you do in this stock market pullback? 

The recent dip in the stock market has created an opportunity to buy post-pandemic stocks at discount. Suncor has growth potential, but its growth comes with risks. There are better stocks like Enbridge and RioCan, which have dividend yields of over 8.86% and 9.97%, respectively. These stocks are also reporting profits and positive cash flows. The stock market pullback has created an opportunity to lock such high-dividend yields for a lifetime.

Here are some more quality stocks to buy in the recent stock market pullback.

The 10 Best Stocks to Buy This Month

Renowned Canadian investor Iain Butler just named 10 stocks for Canadians to buy TODAY. So if you’re tired of reading about other people getting rich in the stock market, this might be a good day for you.
Because Motley Fool Canada is offering a full 65% off the list price of their top stock-picking service, plus a complete membership fee back guarantee on what you pay for the service. Simply click here to discover how you can take advantage of this.

Click Here to Learn More Today!


Fool contributor Puja Tayal has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. Tom Gardner owns shares of Shopify. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Enbridge, Shopify, and Shopify. The Motley Fool owns shares of Lightspeed POS Inc. The Motley Fool recommends KINAXIS INC.

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