Connect with us

Health

Fauci rebuts Republican claims about hydroxychloroquine in Capitol Hill session – CBC.ca

Published

on


Infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci resisted efforts by Republicans to criticize recent protests against racial injustice while pushing back on their continued promotion of hydroxycholoroquine as a possible coronavirus remedy in Congress on Friday.

Fauci’s testimony at a hearing of the U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee on the coronavirus crisis came at the end of a month in which U.S. coronavirus deaths rose by almost 25,000 and cases doubled in at least 18 states, according to a Reuters tally, dealing a crushing blow to hopes of quickly reopening the economy.

The United States has recorded nearly 1.8 million new COVID-19 cases in July out of its total 4.5 million known infections, an increase of 66 per cent with many states yet to report on Friday. Deaths in July rose at least 19 per cent to a total of more than 152,000.

Republican Blaine Luetkemeyer of Missouri submitted into the record a study conducted at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit showing benefits to treating some coronavirus patients with hydroxychloroquine, best known as an anti-malaria drug.

“That study is a flawed study,” said Fauci, stressing it wasn’t a randomized, placebo-controlled trial and that patients also received corticosteroids, which in a separate study exhibited benefits for seriously ill patients.

When confronted with the fact it was peer-reviewed, Fauci demurred.

“It doesn’t matter. You can peer review something that’s a bad study,” he said.

President Donald Trump, some Republicans in Congress and several conservative media commentators have consistently pushed for the drug’s use, many of them widely sharing a video this week extolling its virtues that was produced for the web with funding from the group Tea Party Patriots Action. Facebook eventually pulled the video from its site.

Any and all of the randomized placebo-controlled trials — which is the gold standard of determining if something is effective — none of them have shown any efficacy for hydroxychloroquine.– Dr. Anthony Fauci

The president has claimed he took hydroxychloroquine in the spring with no ill effects.

“Any and all of the randomized placebo-controlled trials — which is the gold standard of determining if something is effective — none of them have shown any efficacy for hydroxychloroquine,” said Fauci.

Fauci, who leads the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, added he would be “the first one to admit it and promote it” if a hydroxychloroquine study in the future meets that standard and shows positive effects.

A veteran of six Republican and Democratic administrations, Fauci has become the most familiar face of the administration’s coronavirus task force but a target of many conservatives who want to see the state economies fully reopened.

Early in the session, Fauci clashed with Rep. Jim Jordan, after the Ohio Republican demanded Fauci’s opinion about whether protests should be curbed or eliminated to control the pandemic.

“Should we limit the protesting?” Jordan asked. When Fauci said he was not in a position to make such a recommendation, the lawmaker retorted: “You make all kinds of recommendations. You make comments on dating, on baseball and everything you could imagine.”

“I’m not favouring anybody over anybody,” Fauci replied. “I’m not going to opine on limiting anything … I’m telling you what is the danger, and you can make your own conclusion about that. You should stay away from crowds, no matter where the crowds are.”

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies during a House subcommittee hearing on the coronavirus crisis on Friday. (Kevin Dietsch/The Associated Press)

Fauci, who made headlines in March by describing U.S. testing efforts as a failing, also resisted efforts by Democrats to criticize the Trump administration response to the virus, frequently handing off questions about the current state of testing and other matters to his fellow panellists.

In addition to Fauci, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Robert Redfield and Admiral Brett Giroir, assistant secretary at the Department of Health and Human Services, also testified.

Testing times still a concern

At the start of the hearing, congressional Republicans and Democrats clashed about whether the Trump administration had a national strategy to respond to the coronavirus pandemic.

“The administration’s approach of deferring to states, sidelining experts and rushing to reopen has prolonged this virus and led to thousands of preventable deaths,” said panel Chairman James Clyburn, who denounced Trump’s coronavirus response as “among the worst of any country in the world.”

A drive-through testing centre is shown earlier this month in Inglewood, Calif. Admiral Brett Giroir, part of the administration’s coronavirus task force, admitted that many test results are not coming back promptly. (Mike Blake/Reuters)

But Steve Scalise, the subcommittee’s top Republican, dismissed Clyburn’s criticism as political posturing, saying the Trump administration has provided effective plans for schools, employers, nursing homes and vaccine development.

“You wouldn’t even be here today if there wasn’t a plan,” said Scalise.

Giroir acknowledged that currently it’s not possible for the U.S. to return all coronavirus test results to patients in two to three days. He blamed overwhelming demand across the nation.

Many health experts say that COVID-19 results are almost worthless when delivered after two or three days because by then the window for contact tracing has closed.

The latest government data shows about 75 per cent of testing results are coming back within five days, but the remainder are taking longer, Giroir told lawmakers.

Rapid, widespread testing is critical to containing the coronavirus outbreak, but the U.S. effort has been plagued by supply shortages and backlogs since the earliest days of the outbreak.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

'Cautious consumer' to remain until COVID-19 vaccine, Indigo CEO says – Airdrie Today

Published

on


TORONTO — Canadian customers likely won’t start frequenting stores for items not on their shopping list until there’s a vaccine for COVID-19, Indigo Books & Music Inc. founder and chief executive said Friday.

“I think our own view is that customers will continue well, well into the months ahead to make shopping an activity they do when they have something specific to buy,” Heather Reisman said during a conference call with analysts. The company released its first-quarter financial results after markets closed Thursday.

Foot traffic is “still way down” for the book retailer, which shuttered all its stores to help stop the spread of the coronavirus and only reopened nearly all 182 of its locations by the end of its most recent quarter.

The Toronto-based company’s revenue for the 13 weeks ended June 27 fell to $135.1 million from $192.6 million due to store closures. It recorded a net loss of about $31.6 million or $1.15 per common share compared with a loss of about $19.1 million or 69 cents per share in the same quarter last year.

Since reopening, retail store sales have tracked at about 72 per cent of sales at the same time last year, said chief financial officer Craig Loudon.

However conversion and average transaction size are both “way up,” noted Reisman.

“So, that’s saying that you’ve got a deliberate customer and we think that that’s going to remain, frankly, until there’s a vaccine.”

In Canada, people watch the news and are afraid of the virus, she said.

“So, all in all, we predict that the retail consumer will remain a cautious consumer,” she said.

The company is working to make the shopping experience easy and safe and is planning for the important holiday shopping season although it remains to be seen how consumers behave during a usually busy period.

The company accelerated efforts during the first quarter to help serve customers safely during the holiday season, including “a robust click-and-collect capability and Instacart service,” said Reisman. These efforts should be implemented in the current quarter.

The company’s e-commerce revenue grew threefold, jumping up 214 per cent for the quarter compared with last year. That demand “has moderated, but remained strong” as stores reopened, said Loudon.

Indigo’s shares, which have plunged from a high of $8.06 last August, surged 19 per cent or 20 cents at $1.25 in afternoon trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 7, 2020.

Companies in this story: (TSX:IDG)

The Canadian Press

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

'Cautious consumer' to remain until COVID-19 vaccine, Indigo CEO says – Thompson Citizen

Published

on


TORONTO — Canadian customers likely won’t start frequenting stores for items not on their shopping list until there’s a vaccine for COVID-19, Indigo Books & Music Inc. founder and chief executive said Friday.

“I think our own view is that customers will continue well, well into the months ahead to make shopping an activity they do when they have something specific to buy,” Heather Reisman said during a conference call with analysts. The company released its first-quarter financial results after markets closed Thursday.

article continues below

Foot traffic is “still way down” for the book retailer, which shuttered all its stores to help stop the spread of the coronavirus and only reopened nearly all 182 of its locations by the end of its most recent quarter.

The Toronto-based company’s revenue for the 13 weeks ended June 27 fell to $135.1 million from $192.6 million due to store closures. It recorded a net loss of about $31.6 million or $1.15 per common share compared with a loss of about $19.1 million or 69 cents per share in the same quarter last year.

Since reopening, retail store sales have tracked at about 72 per cent of sales at the same time last year, said chief financial officer Craig Loudon.

However conversion and average transaction size are both “way up,” noted Reisman.

“So, that’s saying that you’ve got a deliberate customer and we think that that’s going to remain, frankly, until there’s a vaccine.”

In Canada, people watch the news and are afraid of the virus, she said.

“So, all in all, we predict that the retail consumer will remain a cautious consumer,” she said.

The company is working to make the shopping experience easy and safe and is planning for the important holiday shopping season although it remains to be seen how consumers behave during a usually busy period.

The company accelerated efforts during the first quarter to help serve customers safely during the holiday season, including “a robust click-and-collect capability and Instacart service,” said Reisman. These efforts should be implemented in the current quarter.

The company’s e-commerce revenue grew threefold, jumping up 214 per cent for the quarter compared with last year. That demand “has moderated, but remained strong” as stores reopened, said Loudon.

Indigo’s shares, which have plunged from a high of $8.06 last August, surged 19 per cent or 20 cents at $1.25 in afternoon trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 7, 2020.

Companies in this story: (TSX:IDG)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Ottawa on Sunday, Aug. 9 – CBC.ca

Published

on


Recent developments:

  • Ottawa Public Health reported 13 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, bringing the city’s total to 2,623.
  • Some private cannabis retailers in Ottawa say Ontario’s move to Stage 3 has meant a drop in their sales. 
  • The Nunavut government is spending millions to have their residents self-isolate in an Ottawa hotel before returning to the territory.

What’s the latest?

On Saturday, Ottawa Public Health reported 13 new cases of COVID-19, the fourth day of double-digit increases since an earlier drop in the number of new cases early last week. 

Ontario also reported fewer than 100 cases of COVID-19 for the sixth straight day. There were only 70 new cases across the province Saturday.

The Government of Nunavut has spent nearly $5 million since the end of March to house more than 1,200 of its residents at an Ottawa hotel so they can self-isolate before returning home. The territory is taking these steps to keep its COVID-19 case count at zero.

Some cannabis retailers in Ottawa are decrying the province’s move to halt home deliveries late last month. They said they’ve seen a drop in sales they attribute to the province’s decision.

How many cases are there?

There have been 2,623 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Ottawa since the pandemic began. The number of deaths is at 264.

The majority of cases in the city — 2,204 — are classified as resolved.

In all, public health officials have reported more than 4,000 cases across eastern Ontario and western Quebec, with more than 3,400 cases resolved.

 

COVID-19 has killed 102 people in the region outside Ottawa: 52 in Leeds, Grenville and Lanark counties, 17 in other parts of eastern Ontario and 33 in the Outaouais.

Experts analyzing blood tests said last week the number of people infected with the coronavirus in Ontario could be four times more than previously confirmed and in Quebec, more than twice as many.

What’s open and closed?

Ottawa is now in Stage 3 of Ontario’s reopening plan, which means many more businesses are allowed to reopen, including dine-in restaurants and movie theatres.

Indoor gatherings of up to 50 people and outdoor gatherings of up to 100 are now allowed in that province but attendees must adhere to physical distancing guidelines.

Quebec has similar rules, with its cap on physically distanced gatherings in public venues now up to 250 people, allowing smaller festivals.

A customer puts on a mask as they arrive at a store in Ottawa in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Justin Tang/Canadian Press)

The Canada Aviation and Space Museum opened to the public this weekend.

Most Ottawa Public Library branches will be open for in-person browsing and computer use Aug. 17.

Elementary students in Ontario will be heading back to school full time come September, while most high school students will split their time between the classroom and online learning, depending on the board. 

Quebec’s back-to-school plans will bring students to classrooms again this fall.

WATCH | Current back-to-school plan a ‘huge collapse of the imagination,’ MPP says

MPPs Stephen Blais and Joel Harden say the provincial government is not providing enough funding for schools to be able to decrease class sizes and prevent COVID-19 outbreaks upon students’ return in the fall. 1:30

Distancing and isolating

The novel coronavirus primarily spreads through droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes on another person or object. People don’t need to have symptoms to be contagious.

That means physical distancing measures such as working from home, meeting others outdoors as much as possible and keeping distance from anyone they don’t live with or have in their circle, including when you have a mask on.

A girl walks in the shallow waters of the Rideau River near the Adàwe Crossing in Ottawa. (Justin Tang/Canadian Press)

Masks are now mandatory in indoor public settings in all of eastern Ontario and Quebec, where transit officials and taxi drivers are now required to bar access to users over age 12 who refuse to wear one.

Masks are also recommended outdoors when you can’t stay the proper distance from others.

Anyone who has symptoms or travelled recently outside Canada must self-isolate for at least 14 days.

Anyone waiting for a COVID-19 test result in Ontario must self-isolate at least until they know the result. Quebec asks people waiting to only self-isolate in certain circumstances.

People in both provinces should self-isolate if they’ve been in contact with someone who’s tested positive or is presumed to have COVID-19.

Ontario’s Chief Medical Officer of Health strongly urges self-isolation for people with weakened immune systems and OPH recommends people over 70 stay home as much as possible. 

Top medical officials say people should be prepared for the possibility COVID-19 restrictions last into 2022 or 2023.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

COVID-19 can range from a cold-like illness to a severe lung infection, with common symptoms including fever, a dry cough, vomiting and the loss of taste or smell. 

Less common symptoms include chills, headaches and pinkeye. Children can develop a rash.

If you have severe symptoms, call 911.

Where to get tested

In eastern Ontario:

In Ottawa any resident who feels they need a test, even if they are not showing symptoms, can be tested at one of three sites.

Inuit in Ottawa can call the Akausivik Inuit Family Health Team at 613-740-0999 for service, including testing, in Inuktitut or English on weekdays.

A bottle of hand sanitizer sits on a cart at an elementary school in the United States. (Charlie Neibergall/The Associated Press)

In the Eastern Ontario Health Unit area, there is a drive-thru centre in Casselman that can handle 200 tests a day and assessment centres in Hawkesbury and Winchester that don’t require people to call ahead.

Others in Alexandria, Rockland and Cornwall require an appointment.

In Kingston, the Leon’s Centre is hosting the city’s test site. Find it at Gate 2.

Napanee‘s test centre is open daily for people who call for an appointment.

You can arrange a test in Bancroft, Belleville or Trenton by calling the centre and in Picton by texting or calling.

WATCH | Mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic | The Doctors

Two mental health professionals weigh in on how Canadians are handling mental health issues during the COVID-19 pandemic. 5:22

The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark unit asks you to get tested if you have a symptom or concerns about exposure.

It has a walk-in site in Brockville at the Memorial Centre and testing sites in Smiths Falls and Almonte which require an appointment.

Residents in Renfrew County should call their family doctor and those without access to a family doctor can call 1-844-727-6404 to register for a test or if they have health questions, COVID-19-related or not.

In western Quebec:

Outaouais residents now can get a walk-in test in Gatineau five days a week at 135 blvd. Saint-Raymond and at recurring clinics by appointment in communities such as Gracefield, Val-des-Monts and Fort-Coulonge.

They can call 1-877-644-4545 to make an appointment or if they have other questions.

First Nations:

Local communities have declared states of emergency, put in a curfew or both.

Akwesasne has had 14 confirmed COVID-19 cases. Most are linked back to a gathering on an island with a non-resident who wasn’t showing symptoms at the time.

Residents in eastern Ontario can visit a number of COVID-19 testing centres across the region if they’re concerned they could have the virus. (Nathan Denette/Canadian Press)

It has a mobile COVID-19 test site available by appointment only. Anyone returning to the community on the Canadian side of the international border who’s been farther than 80 kilometres away is asked to self-isolate for 14 days. It’s 100 miles or 160 kilometres away on the American side.

Anyone in Tyendinaga who’s interested in a test can call 613-967-3603 to talk to a nurse. Face coverings are now mandatory in its public buildings.

People in Pikwakanagan can book an appointment for a COVID-19 test by calling 613-625-2259.

Kitigan Zibi is planning for an Aug. 29 election with changes depending on the status of the pandemic at that time. It plans on starting to open schools and daycares next month.

For more information

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending