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Find a real estate rep, even in a different city, by first using the 3 R's method – TheSpec.com

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I’m planning a fresh start in a new city in 2021. What’s your advice for remotely hiring a brokerage?

Relocating to a new city is an exciting way to ring in a new year. Choosing the right brokerage and salesperson to represent you in an unfamiliar city is a big decision.

You have a number of options. Many people choose to select salespersons based on referrals and their own research. Some look to a trusted salesperson or brokerage they’ve worked with before to recommend a real estate professional familiar with the market where they plan to purchase.

Whichever option you choose, I recommend taking a three “Rs” approach to the three key factors in the selection process: referrals from friends and family members; references from previous clients of brokers and salespeople; and registration — by looking up a salesperson using RECO’s Real Estate Professional Search tool, you can confirm that a salesperson is registered to trade real estate in the province.

If a friend or family member has referred a salesperson to you, be sure to interview that person before signing a buyer representation agreement (BRA). Every salesperson brings a unique mix of skills and services to the table for their clients, so it’s important to discuss the services offered by each brokerage and their corresponding commissions and fees. This will ensure everyone is on the same page and help prevent misunderstandings along the way.

Requesting they provide you with references from previous clients may also help you in making your selection. If those referring the salesperson to you have been clients, that would be a tremendous benefit.

Sometimes even a referred salesperson isn’t the best fit. Reaching out to a few other salespersons can help give you a good idea about who is best suited to represent your specific interests. Building a good rapport supports a strong mutual understanding of wants, needs and expectations that can go a long way in helping you find the property you envision for your fresh start.

Asking questions will also help to paint an accurate picture of a salesperson’s experience and approach. You’ll want to know:

  • What types of properties they typically work with.
  • The cities, suburbs and neighbourhoods they specialize in. You may be relying heavily on their knowledge regarding services, facilities and community resources in an area unfamiliar to you.
  • How many homes they’ve helped buy or sell.
  • Their overall approach to the buying and selling process, including how they will search and present suitable properties for you and their approach to negotiations, remote showings and COVID-19 safety protocols.

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Once you’ve found a salesperson that you’d like to represent you, use the Real Estate Professional Search Tool available on the RECO website to confirm they’re registered. A profile will confirm their name, brokerage, and their disciplinary history over the last five years.

If you have a question about the home buying or selling process, please email information@reco.on.ca.

Joe Richer

Joe Richer is registrar of the Real Estate Council of Ontario (RECO) and contributor for the Star. Follow him on Twitter: @RECOhelps

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N.S. suspends real estate agent for showing home to client who failed to self-isolate for COVID-19 – Global News

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A Halifax-based real estate agent has had his licence suspended after he showed a home to an individual who he knew to have not self-isolated for a 14-day period as required by the Nova Scotia government to stop the spread of COVID-19.

The decision from the Nova Scotia Real Estate Commission was released on Monday.

In July 2020, Adam Scott of HaliPad Real Estate Inc. showed a home still under construction to a prospective buyer.

Read more:
N.B. strips real estate agents’ licenses for taking ‘egregious advantage’ of senior

At the time, the Atlantic bubble was in effect and permitted residents of another province in the region to travel to another without any self-isolation requirements.

But the Nova Scotia Real Estate Commission found that the unnamed individual who was shown the home was from outside of Atlantic Canada and didn’t self-isolate for the full 14-day period.

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When the house was shown a third person, a builder, was at the home.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

Chris Perkins, the owner of HaliPad, told Global News in a statement that no one had a positive case of COVID-19 and it was not transmitted during the showing.

“This is the first time we experienced COVID-19 protocols not being strictly followed and the agent has taken full accountability for his poor judgement,” he wrote.


Click to play video 'The New Reality: How COVID-19 could impact the commercial real estate market'



2:34
The New Reality: How COVID-19 could impact the commercial real estate market


The New Reality: How COVID-19 could impact the commercial real estate market – Jul 6, 2020

The real estate commission says it repeatedly informed its members through a number of various methods that they were required to follow the federal and provincial COVID-19 health regulations.

In this case, Scott did not, and the commission found that his actions violated the professional conduct standards of a real estate agent.

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As a result, Scott’s licence has been suspended for a month or until Feb. 17 and he has been ordered to pay a $1,000 fine.

Read more:
B.C. realtor suspended after letting buyer move cash into her own bank account, avoiding regulators

Perkins says the company is deeply disappointed by the event and it served to underscore the importance of complying with COVID-19 regulations.

“We will continue to enforce our strict policy that agents will not attend (in-person) appointments with anyone who has not completed their mandatory isolation period.”

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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N.S. suspends real estate agent for showing home to client who failed to self-isolate for COVID-19 – Global News

Published

 on


A Halifax-based real estate agent has had his licence suspended after he showed a home to an individual who he knew to have not self-isolated for a 14-day period as required by the Nova Scotia government to stop the spread of COVID-19.

The decision from the Nova Scotia Real Estate Commission was released on Monday.

In July 2020, Adam Scott of HaliPad Real Estate Inc. showed a home still under construction to a prospective buyer.

Read more:
N.B. strips real estate agents’ licenses for taking ‘egregious advantage’ of senior

At the time, the Atlantic bubble was in effect and permitted residents of another province in the region to travel to another without any self-isolation requirements.

But the Nova Scotia Real Estate Commission found that the unnamed individual who was shown the home was from outside of Atlantic Canada and didn’t self-isolate for the full 14-day period.

Story continues below advertisement

When the house was shown a third person, a builder, was at the home.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

Chris Perkins, the owner of HaliPad, told Global News in a statement that no one had a positive case of COVID-19 and it was not transmitted during the showing.

“This is the first time we experienced COVID-19 protocols not being strictly followed and the agent has taken full accountability for his poor judgement,” he wrote.


Click to play video 'The New Reality: How COVID-19 could impact the commercial real estate market'



2:34
The New Reality: How COVID-19 could impact the commercial real estate market


The New Reality: How COVID-19 could impact the commercial real estate market – Jul 6, 2020

The real estate commission says it repeatedly informed its members through a number of various methods that they were required to follow the federal and provincial COVID-19 health regulations.

In this case, Scott did not, and the commission found that his actions violated the professional conduct standards of a real estate agent.

Story continues below advertisement

As a result, Scott’s licence has been suspended for a month or until Feb. 17 and he has been ordered to pay a $1,000 fine.

Read more:
B.C. realtor suspended after letting buyer move cash into her own bank account, avoiding regulators

Perkins says the company is deeply disappointed by the event and it served to underscore the importance of complying with COVID-19 regulations.

“We will continue to enforce our strict policy that agents will not attend (in-person) appointments with anyone who has not completed their mandatory isolation period.”

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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B.C. real estate regulator clamps down on activities of 'Wolf of Burrard Street' – Vancouver Sun

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Article content continued

The order, issued Friday, includes details about five complaints.

They started in May 2020, but one received by the superintendent in October 2020 was related to a previous complaint that had been filed about Roberts in July 2018.

Roberts was licensed to provide rental property management services from April 2018 to February 2019 and as a real estate agent from December 2018 to February 2019, according to the order, which added his licence was “surrendered by his managing broker.”

Two complaints, the order alleges, involved security deposits taken after the signing of long-term leases where the property owners said their properties were not on the market.

One complaint involved a file with the Vancouver Police Department, which had received numerous complaints related to Roberts, according to the order. Another involved a civil claim in B.C. court.

In the other, Roberts accepted $1,850 as a security deposit for a three-bed room apartment, the order alleges. The owner told the superintendent he had never rented out his property and lived there himself, the order alleges.

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