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Five provinces break COVID-19 records as new measures take effect

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TORONTO —
As new COVID-19 infections continue to soar in Canada, more provinces are seeing record-breaking numbers of infections and deaths.

Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan and Alberta all broke their single-day case counts on Saturday, while Manitoba logged its deadliest day of the pandemic.

Canada’s top doctor Theresa Tam said at this rate, Canada could potentially see 10,000 new daily-cases by mid-December. Infectious diseases specialist Dr. Isaac Bogoch said Canada isn’t prepared for those kinds of numbers.

“Ten thousand new cases in Canada per day is too much to sustain over any period of time,” Bogoch told CTV News Channel on Saturday. “We need to do everything we can to prevent that from happening.”

ONTARIO

Ontario broke another single-day caseload record Saturday with 1,581 reported cases and 20 new deaths, which is also the highest single-day death toll since the start of the pandemic’s second wave. Health Minister Christine Elliott said 497 of those cases were found in Peel Region, 456 in Toronto, 130 in York Region and 77 in Ottawa.

More than 44,800 tests were completed, she said.

Toronto and the Greater Toronto Area are all currently in the red zone, a colour-coded system designed to help curb the spread of the virus.

MANITOBA

Manitoba recorded its deadliest day of the pandemic while reporting a record-breaking 15 new deaths. Eleven of the deaths are related to an outbreak at the Maples Personal Care Home.

The province also reported 239 new cases of the virus.

On Thursday, the Manitoba government issued the entire province under the critical or red level on the pandemic response system. The province’s restrictions include closures of all non-essential business while restricting travel within the province.

QUEBEC

Quebec health authorities reported 1,448 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, a record-breaking single day increase. The province also reported 25 new deaths linked to the virus for a total of 6,611.

Montreal recorded the most cases of any Quebec region, with 341 infections. Montreal is followed by 183 new cases in Lanaudiere, 138 in Monteregie and 122 in Quebec City.

Quebec maintains the highest number of cases per capita out all provinces.

SASKATCHEWAN

Saskatchewan reported 308 new COVID-19 cases on Saturday, topping its previous single-day increase record.

The spike in cases pushes the total number of active COVID-19 cases to 1,691.

The province blamed snowstorms for the rise in numbers claiming fewer people would have gone to get tested, despite possibly showing COVID-19 symptoms.

Saskatoon is reporting the highest concentrated number of positive cases in the province at 123, while in Regina, 20 new cases are reported. The other 165 cases are shown to come from more rural zones of the province.

ALBERTA

Alberta broke its single-day record of COVID-19 cases on Saturday as the province reported 1,026 new cases.

It is the first time Alberta has reported more than 1,000 new daily cases since the pandemic began.

Three new deaths were also reported, bringing the province’s total death toll to 401.

“Infection rates in Alberta are much higher than what were seeing in the east where more severe restrictions are in place,“ infectious diseases specialist Dr. Craig Jenne told CTV News Channel.

“It’s important to recognize to that the virus is not behaving the same in every jurisdictions.”

Jenne said one of the best ways to get control of the pandemic is for everyone to wear a mask in public spaces, even if they’re not in a jurisdiction that requires one.

“The faster we get these numbers under control the faster these restrictions will be lifted,” he said.

Source: – CTV News

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It’s ‘unknown’ when Canada will reach herd immunity from coronavirus vaccine: Tam – Global News

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The percentage of the Canadian population that needs to be vaccinated in order to reach widespread immunity against the coronavirus is unknown, according to Canada’s chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam.

Speaking at a media conference Friday, Tam was asked what entails a “successful vaccine campaign,” in order to determine when the population reaches herd immunity.

READ MORE: Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the novel coronavirus as second wave surges, Tam says

“Nobody actually knows the level of vaccine coverage to achieve community immunity or herd immunity,” Tam explained. “We have an assumption that you will probably need 60 to 70 per cent of people to be vaccinated. But we don’t know that for sure … that’s modelling. Lots of these calculations are being done but bottom line is that we actually don’t know.”

The end goal, Tam added, is to vaccinate as many Canadian as quickly as possible.

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According to the World Health Organization (WHO), herd immunity is when a population can be protected from a certain virus, like COVID-19, if a threshold of vaccination is reached. It’s achieved by protecting people from a virus, not by exposing them to it, the WHO added.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

However, the percentage of people needed to be vaccinated in order to create herd immunity depends on the disease.

For example, herd immunity against measles requires about 95 per cent of a population to be vaccinated and for polio, the threshold is about 80 per cent, the WHO stated.


Click to play video 'Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the coronavirus as second wave surges: Tam'



8:56
Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the coronavirus as second wave surges: Tam


Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the coronavirus as second wave surges: Tam – Nov 1, 2020

Tam previously told Global News in November that Canada is still nowhere near herd immunity with the coronavirus.

“We’re only at a few percentage points in terms of the immunity in our population. That leaves over 90 per cent of the population, or 95 per cent of the population still vulnerable,” Tam said.

Story continues below advertisement

Read more:
Two shots. A waiting period. Why the coronavirus vaccine won’t be a quick fix

Canada is currently battling a severe second wave of COVID-19 cases. Officials are urging people to remain vigilant in stopping the spread of the virus, despite the promising vaccine news.

Canada expects the first doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to be administered in January, which will go to the country’s most vulnerable populations.

Last week Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he hopes to see the “majority” of Canadians vaccinated by September, though he did not specify exactly what that means as far as a percentage of the population.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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It’s ‘unknown’ when Canada will reach herd immunity from coronavirus vaccine: Tam – Global News

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The percentage of the Canadian population that needs to be vaccinated in order to reach widespread immunity against the coronavirus is unknown, according to Canada’s chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam.

Speaking at a media conference Friday, Tam was asked what entails a “successful vaccine campaign,” in order to determine when the population reaches herd immunity.

READ MORE: Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the novel coronavirus as second wave surges, Tam says

“Nobody actually knows the level of vaccine coverage to achieve community immunity or herd immunity,” Tam explained. “We have an assumption that you will probably need 60 to 70 per cent of people to be vaccinated. But we don’t know that for sure … that’s modelling. Lots of these calculations are being done but bottom line is that we actually don’t know.”

The end goal, Tam added, is to vaccinate as many Canadian as quickly as possible.

Story continues below advertisement

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), herd immunity is when a population can be protected from a certain virus, like COVID-19, if a threshold of vaccination is reached. It’s achieved by protecting people from a virus, not by exposing them to it, the WHO added.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

However, the percentage of people needed to be vaccinated in order to create herd immunity depends on the disease.

For example, herd immunity against measles requires about 95 per cent of a population to be vaccinated and for polio, the threshold is about 80 per cent, the WHO stated.


Click to play video 'Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the coronavirus as second wave surges: Tam'



8:56
Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the coronavirus as second wave surges: Tam


Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the coronavirus as second wave surges: Tam – Nov 1, 2020

Tam previously told Global News in November that Canada is still nowhere near herd immunity with the coronavirus.

“We’re only at a few percentage points in terms of the immunity in our population. That leaves over 90 per cent of the population, or 95 per cent of the population still vulnerable,” Tam said.

Story continues below advertisement

Read more:
Two shots. A waiting period. Why the coronavirus vaccine won’t be a quick fix

Canada is currently battling a severe second wave of COVID-19 cases. Officials are urging people to remain vigilant in stopping the spread of the virus, despite the promising vaccine news.

Canada expects the first doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to be administered in January, which will go to the country’s most vulnerable populations.

Last week Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he hopes to see the “majority” of Canadians vaccinated by September, though he did not specify exactly what that means as far as a percentage of the population.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Canada surpasses 400000 total COVID-19 cases

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OTTAWA —
Canada has now recorded more than 400,000 cases of COVID-19 since the beginning of the global pandemic.

Today’s bleak marker came after Saskatchewan reported 283 new cases of the virus today, bringing the national tally to 400,030.

The speed at which Canada reached the 400,000 mark is the latest sign of the accelerating pace of the pandemic across the country.

Canada recorded its 300,000th case of COVID-19 18 days ago on Nov. 16.

It took six months for Canada to record its first 100,000 cases of COVID-19, four months to reach the 200,000 threshold and less than a month to arrive at 300,000.

Canada’s national death toll from the virus currently stands at 12,470.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 4, 2020.

Source:- CTV News

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