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Fourth wave levelling off in Canada: modelling – CTV News

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OTTAWA —
The Delta-driven fourth wave of the pandemic appears to be levelling off nationally, although people who are unvaccinated continue to experience severe outcomes from COVID-19 infections at “elevated rates,” according to Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam.

While daily case counts have slowed, new national modelling released Friday shows that in Saskatchewan, Alberta, and the Northwest Territories COVID-19 infections are continuing to put “significant strain on the health system.” Similar challenges are being seen in smaller health regions with low vaccine uptake as well.

“Over the past month, lessons have been hard learned where measures were relaxed too much or too soon—and especially where vaccination coverage remains low—providing further cautionary tales on the relentless behaviour and severe impacts of this virus,” Tam said.

Though, as vaccination rates increase across the country, the epidemic has dropped out of a growth pattern nationally, the documents issued by the Public Health Agency of Canada indicate.

“This update reaffirms that by achieving a strong foundation of protection… and applying public health measures, epidemic growth can be managed,” Tam said.

Vaccines continue to be highly protective, even in the face of the Delta variant, as the federal data indicates that new cases were 10 times higher among the unvaccinated than those who are fully vaccinated. Moreover, those who are unvaccinated are 36 times more likely to end up in hospital if they contract COVID-19.

Tam said that there are still nearly six million eligible Canadians who are not yet fully vaccinated, with the rates of coverage lowest in the 18-29 age group. Just 72 per cent of Canadians in that demographic have received both doses. In contrast, 91 per cent of those aged 70 and older are fully immunized.

The forecast provides a more optimistic outlook than the agency issued last month, warning then that without reduced levels of virus transmission, Canada’s daily COVID-19 caseload could reach unprecedented highs.

Tam cites enhanced restrictions brought in between late August and September — such as the reinstating of a public health emergency in Alberta — for helping to slow the pace of spread.

Tam said that with more folks gathering indoors as the fall weather sets in, maintaining public health precautions like masking and physical distancing will continue to help reduce the likelihood of another resurgence of the virus.

Speaking directly to those with dinner parties planned for those celebrating Thanksgiving this weekend, Tam suggested limiting indoor gatherings to fully vaccinated guests.

While Tam said she has “no specific plans” for in-person meals this long weekend, if she does it’ll be with her fully-vaccinated immediate family. Deputy Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Howard Njoo told reporters he has plans for a meal with his fully-vaccinated family, though noted some Canadians may be having a “tougher time” having that conversation with loved ones.

Federal officials are forecasting that, by Oct. 17, there could be between approximately 19,900 and 60,600 new COVID-19 infections. On average across Canada over the last seven days there were an average of more than 3,700 new cases confirmed daily, and approximately 2,500 COVID-19 patients in being treated in hospital, 770 of which were in the ICU.

As of Friday morning, according to CTV News’ vaccine tracker, 81.6 per cent of those eligible are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, and there are currently more than 41,000 active infections nationwide.

“It is important to stress that even as the fourth wave recedes, COVID-19 is unlikely to disappear entirely, and there could continue to be bumps along the way,” Tam said.

Oct. 8 Public Health Agency of Canada modelling

Oct. 8 Public Health Agency of Canada modelling
 

Source: Public Health Agency of Canada. Data as of Oct. 2, 2021.

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Biden says United States would come to Taiwan’s defense

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The United States would come to Taiwan‘s defense and has a commitment to defend the island China claims as its own, U.S. President Joe Biden said on Thursday, though the White House said later there was no change in policy towards the island.

“Yes, we have a commitment to do that,” Biden said at a CNN town hall when asked if the United States would come to the defense of Taiwan, which has complained of mounting military and political pressure from Beijing to accept Chinese sovereignty.

While Washington is required by law to provide Taiwan with the means to defend itself, it has long followed a policy of “strategic ambiguity” on whether it would intervene militarily to protect Taiwan in the event of a Chinese attack.

In August, a Biden administration https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-pacific/us-position-taiwan-unchanged-despite-biden-comment-official-2021-08-19 official said U.S. policy on Taiwan had not changed after the president appeared to suggest the United States would defend the island if it were attacked.

A White House spokesperson said Biden at his town hall was not announcing any change in U.S. policy and “there is no change in our policy”.

“The U.S. defense relationship with Taiwan is guided by the Taiwan Relations Act. We will uphold our commitment under the Act, we will continue to support Taiwan’s self-defense, and we will continue to oppose any unilateral changes to the status quo,” the spokesperson said.

Biden said people should not worry about Washington’s military strength because “China, Russia and the rest of the world knows we’re the most powerful military in the history of the world,”

“What you do have to worry about is whether or not they’re going to engage in activities that would put them in a position where they may make a serious mistake,” Biden said.

“I don’t want a cold war with China. I just want China to understand that we’re not going to step back, that we’re not going to change any of our views.”

Military tensions between Taiwan and China are at their worst in more than 40 years, Taiwan’s Defense Minister Chiu Kuo-cheng said this month, adding that China will be capable of mounting a “full-scale” invasion by 2025.

Taiwan says it is an independent country and will defend its freedoms and democracy.

China says Taiwan is the most sensitive and important issue in its ties with the United States and has denounced what it calls “collusion” between Washington and Taipei.

Speaking to reporters earlier on Thursday, China’s United Nations Ambassador Zhang Jun said they are pursuing “peaceful reunification” with Taiwan and responding to “separatist attempts” by its ruling Democratic Progressive Party.

“We are not the troublemaker. On the contrary, some countries – the U.S. in particular – is taking dangerous actions, leading the situation in Taiwan Strait into a dangerous direction,” he said.

“I think at this moment what we should call is that the United States to stop such practice. Dragging Taiwan into a war definitely is in nobody’s interest. I don’t see that the United States will gain anything from that.”

(Reporting by Trevor Hunnicutt; Additional reporting by David Brunnstrom in Washington, Michelle Nichols in New York and Ben Blanchard in Taipei; Writing by Mohammad Zargham; Editing by Stephen Coates)

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Alec Baldwin fires gun on movie set, killing cinematographer, authorities say

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Actor Alec Baldwin fired a prop gun on a movie set in New Mexico on Thursday, killing cinematographer Halyna Hutchins and wounding director Joel Souza, authorities said.

The incident occurred on the set of independent feature film “Rust,” the Santa Fe County Sheriff’s office said in a statement.

“The sheriff’s office confirms that two individuals were shot on the set of Rust. Halyna Hutchins, 42, director of photography, and Joel Souza, 48, director, were shot when a prop  firearms was discharged by Alec Baldwin, 68, producer and actor,” the police said in a statement.

A Variety report https://bit.ly/3nnyldg said the shooting occurred at the Bonanza Creek Ranch, a production location south of Santa Fe in New Mexico.

No charges have yet been filed in regard to the incident, said the police, adding they are investigating the shooting.

Baldwin’s representatives did not immediately respond to Reuters’ request for comment.

 

(Reporting by Bhargav Acharya in Bengaluru; Editing by Karishma Singh)

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Trudeau 'confident' other countries will accept Canadians' proof of vaccination – CBC.ca

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said today he’s “very confident” countries around the world will accept Canadians’ proof of vaccination.

Today, the federal government announced that Canadians will be able to use a standardized provincial or territorial proof-of-vaccination documentation to travel internationally — although it will be up to foreign governments to accept them or not.

Government officials, speaking on background during a briefing this morning, said they worked with the provinces to come up with a “pan Canadian” format and are confident it will be widely accepted.

They added the government is working with other countries to ensure acceptance abroad.

“We are very confident this proof-of-vaccination certificate that will be federally approved, issued by the provinces with the health information for Canadians, is going to be accepted at destinations worldwide,” Trudeau told a news conference in Ottawa today.

The standardized COVID-19 proof of vaccination includes the holder’s name and date of birth, the number of doses received, the type of vaccine, lot numbers, dates of vaccination and a QR code that includes the vaccination history. Canadians can also request the proof by mail.

The documentation was designed with what the government calls a “common look” featuring the Government of Canada logo and the Canadian flag.

The official Canada wordmark on the top right of an Ontario vaccination proof document. (Government of Ontario)

The government said that as of today, Ontario, Quebec, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, Nunavut, Northwest Territories and Yukon are issuing the standardized proof of vaccination.

Trudeau said all the provinces and territories have agreed to issue the accepted credentials ahead of the holiday season.

“Not every province has yet delivered on that but I know they are all working very quickly and should resolve that in the weeks to come,” he said.

In Ontario, for example, fully vaccinated residents can download a QR code built to the SMART Health Card standard, which includes the Government of Canada “wordmark” or logo.

WATCH |  Canadians will be able to use their provincial vaccine certificates for international travel

Canadians will be able to use their provincial vaccine certificates for international travel, says Trudeau

10 hours ago

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says that as more provinces and territories require the use of vaccine certificates, he is ‘confident’ that foreign governments will accept these documents from Canadians travelling internationally. 2:01

The SMART Health Card standard is a set of guidelines, approved by the International Organization for Standardization and endorsed by Canada, to store health information and is used by a number of tech companies, including Apple. 

The government said it’s talking to other countries to encourage them to recognize those who have received mixed vaccine doses as being fully vaccinated.

“This includes sharing Canada’s evidence and experience with mixed schedules of Health Canada-authorized vaccines for both AstraZeneca/mRNA and mixed mRNA doses,” says a government release.

“Initial outreach has focused on the ongoing exchange of technical and scientific information to advance this time-sensitive work.”

Proof can be used for domestic travel too

The standardized proof of vaccination can also be used when the requirement for proof of vaccination to travel domestically kicks in at the end of the month, although travellers can continue to use their old provincial proof of vaccination if their province is not yet issuing the standardized credentials.

As of Oct. 30, all travellers aged 12 and older taking flights leaving Canadian airports or travelling on Via Rail and Rocky Mountaineer trains must be fully vaccinated before boarding. Marine passengers on non-essential passenger vessels like cruise ships must also complete the vaccination series before travelling.

Mike McNaney is president of the National Airlines Council of Canada, which represents Canada’s largest air carriers — including Air Canada, Air Transat and WestJet. He said he welcomes the standardized approach and urged the government to ease off on other pandemic measures.

“With aviation becoming one of the only sectors requiring fully vaccinated employees and customers, it is imperative that the government work with us and determine what other travel measures can now be amended in keeping with global practices,” he wrote in a media statement.

“Such as elimination of blanket advisories against travel, elimination of mandatory PCR testing pre-departure for fully vaccinated international travellers coming to Canada, and enabling children under 12 to be exempt from de facto home quarantine.”

Officials said they considered other options, including federally issued credentials, but decided that would have “limited value” given that provinces and territories administered the shots and held the data.

They also said the global health travel advisories will soon adopt a destination-based approach, so that Canadians can better prepare travel plans.

Dispute over mandatory vaccine rule for MPs continues

Trudeau’s announcement comes as a fight brews over making vaccination mandatory for MPs ahead of Parliament’s return next month.

Earlier this week, the House of Commons’ governing body introduced a new mandatory vaccination policy for MPs and anyone else entering the House of Commons.

Conservatives said they oppose the “secret” move by the Board of Internal Economy and object to the idea of more virtual sittings of the chamber.

“While we encourage everyone who can be vaccinated to get vaccinated, we cannot agree to seven MPs, meeting in secret, deciding which of the 338 MPs, just elected by Canadians, can enter the House of Commons to represent their constituents,” said a statement from the party Wednesday.

 WATCH| ‘It’s not too much to ask’ — Trudeau discusses mandatory vaccination rule for MPs

‘It’s not too much to ask’ — Trudeau discusses mandatory vaccination rule for those working in the House of Commons

10 hours ago

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses the COVID-19 vaccine mandate for MPs, which will be in place when Parliament resumes in November. 2:04

While the Conservative Party says that it supports vaccination as the “most important tool to get us out of this pandemic,” it did not require all of its candidates in the federal election to be fully vaccinated. It also didn’t reveal how many of its candidates were vaccinated.

Both the Liberals and NDP required that their candidates be vaccinated during the election campaign, though they did not extend that requirement to staff members. The Bloc Québécois said during the campaign that all of its candidates were vaccinated. The Green Party told CBC that both of its MPs have been fully vaccinated.

“It is puzzling to me that there are people out there that think that just because they are members of Parliament they do not need to keep themselves, their loved ones or their constituents safe, when the vast majority of Canadians have done the right thing,” Trudeau said Wednesday.

“It is on Mr. O’Toole to explain why he thinks people should not be fully vaccinated if they want to serve as members of Parliament, and why indeed he doesn’t even think there should be a hybrid model so those who aren’t fully vaccinated can still speak up for their constituents in the House of Commons.”

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