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French health officials confirm three cases of coronavirus

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One patient is a 48-year-old man in the southwestern city of Bordeaux, Health Minister Agnès Buzyn told reporters.
Buzyn said the man traveled to China and visited Wuhan before returning to France on January 22. A day later, he sought medical examination and has remained in isolation since then.
“He’s in isolation and he’s doing well,” Buzyn said.
A visual guide to the Wuhan coronavirus
Two other patients have been admitted to a hospital in Paris, the ministry said in a statement.
“It might be because we set up the tests in a very short time making us capable to identify them,” the minister told reporters. “What matters is to contain the fire as fast as possible, that’s why we need to know the patient’s history, find the people that patient was in contact with, to meet them, speak to them and give them the instructions to first of all stay at home and avoid any contact.”
The virus, which was first discovered in the city of Wuhan in December, has spread to every province in China, except the remote autonomous regions of Qinghai and Tibet, with the number of infections rising to more than 1,000 worldwide.
As of Friday, the virus had claimed the lives of at least 41 people in mainland China.
The virus has started to spread around the world. Two cases have been identified in the United States, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The patients, a woman in her 60s and a man in his 30s, traveled to Wuhan and recently returned to the US.
Cases of the virus have been confirmed in Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Japan and Vietnam.

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Study explores the risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus following SARS-CoV-2 infections – News-Medical.Net

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In a recent study posted to the medRxiv* preprint server, researchers evaluated individuals who had severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections and were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus within six months of the onset of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to understand the temporal relationship between SARS-CoV-2 infections and diabetes mellitus.

Study: Are fewer cases of diabetes mellitus diagnosed in the months after SARS-CoV-2 infection? Image Credit: Africa Studio/Shutterstock

Background

Recent research indicates a potential increase in the new-onset diabetes mellitus diagnoses after SARS-CoV-2 infections. While the causative mechanisms are not clearly understood, various hypotheses suggest the roles of stress-induced hyperglycemia during SARS-CoV-2 infections, changes in the innate immune system, virus-induced damage or changes to the beta cells or vasculature of the pancreas, as well as the side effects of the treatment in the increased incidence of diabetes mellitus diagnoses.

Furthermore, the drastic lifestyle changes brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic have decreased physical activity and increased obesity. The stress induced by the pandemic has also increased endogenous cortisol levels, a known risk factor for diabetes mellitus. Examining the temporal relationship between SARS-CoV-2 infections and new-onset cases of diabetes mellitus will help develop effective screening and therapeutic strategies.

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About the study

In the present study, the team conducted a nationwide analysis using electronic health records aggregated in the National COVID Cohort Collaborative (N3C) database in the United States (U.S.). They analyzed all individuals with SARS-CoV-2 infections and type 2 diabetes mellitus between March 2020 and February 2022. Data from the health records for the six months preceding and following the SARS-CoV-2 infections were included to avoid selection and ascertainment bias.

SARS-CoV-2 infections were confirmed based on the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code, or laboratory test results. New-onset diabetes mellitus cases were defined as those that did not have an ICD code for diabetes mellitus in their electronic health records before September 2019. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was then analyzed concerning SARS-CoV-2 infections.

Results

The results reported a sharp increase in new-onset diabetes mellitus diagnoses in the 30 days following SARS-CoV-2 infections, with the incidence of new diagnoses decreasing in the post-acute stage up to approximately a year after the infection. Surprisingly, the number of new-onset diabetes mellitus cases in the months following SARS-CoV-2 infections is lower than in the months preceding the infection.

The authors believe that the increase in healthcare interactions brought about due to the COVID-19 pandemic might explain the notable increase in diabetes mellitus diagnoses in the time surrounding SARS-CoV-2 infections. New patients might have been tested for hemoglobin A1C or glucose levels during their first interaction with the healthcare system, the results of which might have then been used to diagnose diabetes mellitus.

Additionally, SARS-CoV-2 infection-induced physiological stress could have triggered diabetes mellitus in high-risk individuals who might have developed the disease later in life without COVID-19.

According to the authors, the overall risk of developing diabetes mellitus has increased, irrespective of SARS-CoV-2 infections, due to the drastic decrease in physical activity, weight gain, and the stress induced by the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, a longer follow-up period might report an increased incidence in new-onset diabetes mellitus cases, with the SARS-CoV-2 infection precipitating disease development in individuals who might not have otherwise developed diabetes.

Conclusions

To summarize, the researchers conducted a cross-sectional, nationwide analysis of individuals in the U.S. to understand the temporal relationship between diagnoses of new-onset diabetes mellitus and SARS-CoV-2 infections. The results reported a spike in diabetes mellitus diagnoses in the one month following SARS-CoV-2 infections, followed by a marked decrease in the number of diagnoses for up to a year after the infection.

The authors believe that the sudden increase in diabetes diagnoses could be due to increased healthcare interactions brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. The new-onset diabetes mellitus cases could also be a reaction to the physiological stress induced by SARS-CoV-2 infections.

Furthermore, the drastic lifestyle changes brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic might be responsible for the high incidence of diabetes mellitus, irrespective of SARS-CoV-2 infections. However, extensive research is required to understand the epidemiology and mechanisms connecting SARS-CoV-2 infections with new-onset diabetes mellitus.

*Important notice

medRxiv publishes preliminary scientific reports that are not peer-reviewed and, therefore, should not be regarded as conclusive, guide clinical practice/health-related behavior, or treated as established information.

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Toronto-based infectious disease expert seeing more older patients with flu in hospital

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An infectious diseases physician in Toronto is reporting an increase in the number of older patients he is seeing with seasonal influenza.

Dr. Isaac Bogoch at Toronto General Hospital noted this year’s flu season started early and escalated quickly.

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According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, children under five are still making up the largest age bracket of flu patients in hospital. However, rates among seniors (aged 65 and up) are on the rise.

Bogoch expects the number of flu cases to keep increasing. The season usually peaks in January.

To track the number of flu cases in Durham Region this season, click here.

 

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Breakthrough Infections More Likely in Infliximab Treated IBD Patients Than Those Treated With Vedolizumab

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Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treated with infliximab who were vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2 were more likely to have a breakthrough infection than patients treated with vedolizumab, but the benefits of the vaccine are still superior.

A team, led by Zhigang Liu, PhD, Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction, Imperial College London, determined how infliximab and vedolizumab affect vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies against highly transmissible omicron (B.1.1.529) BA.1, and BA.4 and BA.5 (hereafter BA.4/5) SARS-CoV-2 variants.

The Treatments

Anti-TNF drugs, including infliximab, are linked to attenuated antibody responses following SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. The variants included in the analysis have the ability to evade host immunity and with emerging sublineages are currently the dominating variants causing the current waves of infection.

In the prospective, multicenter, observation, CLARITY IBD cohort study, the investigators looked at the effect of infliximab and vedolizumab on SARS-CoV-2 infections and vaccinations in patients with IBD.

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The study included patients aged 5 years or older with an IBD diagnosis that were treated with infliximab or vedolizumab for 6 weeks or longer in infusion units at 92 hospitals in the UK. Each participant had uninterrupted biological therapy since recruitment and were not previously diagnosed with a SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Outcomes

The investigators sought primary outcomes of neutralizing antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2 wild-type and omicron subvariants BA.1 and BA.4/5 following 3 doses of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

The team also investigated the risk of breakthrough infections in relation to neutralizing antibody titers using Cox proportional hazard models.

There were 7224 patients with IBD recruited to the study between September 22 and December 23, 2020. Of this group, 1288 had no previous SARS-CoV-2 infections after 3 doses of the vaccine that were established on either infliximab (n = 871) or vedolizumab (n = 417). The median age of the patient population was 46.1 years.

Following 3 doses of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, 50% neutralizing titers were significantly lower in the infliximab group compared to patients treated with vedolizumab against wild-type (geometric mean, 2062; 95% CI, 1720–2473 vs geometric mean, 3440; 95% CI, 2939–4026; P <0.0001), BA.1 (geographic mean, 107.3; 95% CI, 86.40–133.2 vs geographic mean, 648.9; 95% CI, 523.5–804.5; P <0.0001), and BA.4/5 (geographic mean, 40.63; 95% CI, 31.99–51.60] vs geographic mean, 223.0; 95% CI, 183.1–271.4; P <0.0001) variants.

Breakthrough infections more frequently occurred in patients treated with infliximab (n = 119; 13.7%; 95% CI, 11.5–16.2) than in those treated with vedolizumab (n = 29; 7.0%; 95% CI, 4.8–10.0; P = 0.00040).

The Cox proportional hazard models show time to breakthrough infection after the third vaccine dose in the infliximab group was associated with a higher hazard risk than treatment with vedolizumab (HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.08-2.71; P = 0.022).

There was also higher neutralizing antibody titers against BA.4/5 with a lower hazard risk in the group with a breakthrough infection and a longer time to breakthrough infection (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95; P = 0.0028).

“Our findings underline the importance of continued SARS-CoV-2 vaccination programs, including second-generation bivalent vaccines, especially in patient subgroups where vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy might be reduced, such as those on anti-TNF therapies,” the authors wrote.

The study, “Neutralizing antibody potency against SARS-CoV-2 wild-type and omicron BA.1 and BA.4/5 variants in patients with inflammatory bowel disease treated with infliximab and vedolizumab after three doses of COVID-19 vaccine (CLARITY IBD): an analysis of a prospective multicenter cohort study,” was published online in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

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