Connect with us

Real eState

Hamilton-Burlington real estate sales slow down in November – Global News

Published

 on


The latest real estate statistics for Hamilton and Burlington show the market continues to cool off after a red hot summer.

The Realtors Association of Hamilton-Burlington (RAHB) says 1,233 homes were sold in November, down 24 per cent from October, but up 17 per cent compared to November of last year.

The average price for a home in the area is now $722,317, 0.11 per cent higher than last month and a 21 per cent jump from November 2019.

Realtors Association President Kathy Della-Nebbia says there are a number of reasons for the slowdown in activity, including the rising cases of coronavirus and Hamilton being placed in the province’s COVID-19 red zone, as well as the colder weather.

Read more:
Cottage prices rise as more Canadians look toward future of full-time remote work

Story continues below advertisement

“What we can initially see is that the market has slowed from last month, and this is due to the colder weather, the COVID-19 cases increasing throughout the province, and Hamilton/Burlington moving to Red Zone as of November 16 where open houses are now banned,” says RAHB President Kathy Della-Nebbia. “An extremely low number of active listings at the end of each month is continuing to drive average prices higher. It’s a vicious cycle of sellers not listing their homes until they are confident they will find another home to buy.”

Realtors Association of Hamilton-Burlington


Realtors Association of Hamilton-Burlington.


Realtors Association of Hamilton-Burlington

RAHB says new listings were down nearly 29 per cent over October 2020 and up 16 per cent over last November.

The number of active listings available at the end of the month was 40.8 per cent lower compared to the previous year.

The number of sales of single-family properties in the RAHB market decreased in November 2020 by 3.8 per cent compared to the same month last year, the number of new listings was down 10.5 per cent over last year, and the average sale price increased by 24.4 per cent to $812,912.

Story continues below advertisement

Townhouse sales activity across the entire RAHB market area increased from November 2019 by 15.2 per cent, new listings were up 19 per cent, and the townhouse average sale price increased by 17.6 per cent to $606,367.

“The activity for single-family properties was slower, and this is most likely because fewer sellers chose to list their homes during this time,” says Della-Nebbia. “We can also see that towns and apartments are still quite active, but their average price did not increase as much as single-family properties, and so this could indicate that single-family properties are still much more in demand — this would make sense during these times as we see a movement towards homes with more elbow room and outdoor space.”

Story continues below advertisement


Click to play video 'How to choose between multiple offers on your real estate listing'



4:20
How to choose between multiple offers on your real estate listing


How to choose between multiple offers on your real estate listing – Nov 12, 2020

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Real eState

Dartmouth real estate agent fined, suspended for taking dog – CBC.ca

Published

 on


A Dartmouth, N.S., real estate agent has been fined $2,500 and had her professional licence suspended for a month after taking a man’s dog and failing to return the pet.

Mike Smaggus said real estate agent Sarah Sullivan took his bichon frise, Snoopy, under the pretense of dog-sitting for a night last spring, but instead rehomed the animal.

“This conduct is dishonourable, unprofessional, harmful to the best interests of the public and to the reputation of the industry at large,” the Nova Scotia Real Estate Commission said in its decision.

At the time, Smaggus and Snoopy were living in a rented north-end Dartmouth house that was listed for sale. Though Sullivan was not the listing agent, she had been to the home.

Smaggus said Sullivan offered to buy Snoopy, but he told her the dog was not for sale. She then offered to take the dog for a night while Smaggus moved out and found a new, pet-friendly place to live.

Dog rehomed

Smaggus said Sullivan gave him $200, either to help pay for the move or for Snoopy’s care. When he tried to get the dog back, Sullivan told him that Snoopy was no longer with her and that he had been rehomed. 

When Smaggus tried to get Snoopy back, Sullivan used or threatened “to use information acquired only as a result of her access to the property as a real estate licensee,” the real estate commission said in its decision.

The commission also accused Sullivan of providing false or misleading information to investigators on several occasions. The board also noted a prior disciplinary action against Sullivan in 2014 when she provided false information to the commission.

Not a theft

Smaggus said he called police but was told it was a civil matter, not a theft, since money had changed hands.

“I’m pretty sure I won’t get the dog back,” he told CBC News. “It’s left a pretty bad taste in my mouth, the whole thing.”

Smaggus put out an appeal on social media, but has not heard anything. He said he doesn’t think there’s much he can do.

“Whoever has my dog has had him since last June, so I don’t think it’s really fair for me to take the dog back,” he said. “I’d like to see him, make sure he’s just doing alright.”

Sullivan told CBC News she is unable to tell her side of the story on the advice of her lawyer. The suspension on her licence is expected to be lifted in mid-February.

MORE TOP STORIES 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Real eState

Halifax real estate agent suspended after showing home to client who skipped isolation – CBC.ca

Published

 on


A Halifax real estate agent has been suspended after knowingly showing a home to a client who had just arrived in Nova Scotia from outside Atlantic Canada, skipping the 14-day isolation requirement.

The licence of Adam Scott of HaliPad Real Estate Inc. has been suspended for one month, until Feb. 18, for violating the Real Estate Trading Act, according to a notice from the Nova Scotia Real Estate Commission.

The commission said an investigation was conducted after a complaint was made by a member of the public. 

“The evidence supported Mr. Scott facilitated a viewing with a client knowing the client arrived from outside of Atlantic Canada the night before and had not completed the province’s COVID-19 pandemic mandatory 14-day self-isolation,” the notice said.

The commission said real estate agents and other industry members are required to follow COVID-19 health directives issued by the federal and provincial governments.

Scott was also ordered to pay a $1,000 fine.

MORE TOP STORIES 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Real eState

N.S. suspends real estate agent for showing home to client who failed to self-isolate for COVID-19 – Global News

Published

 on


A Halifax-based real estate agent has had his licence suspended after he showed a home to an individual who he knew to have not self-isolated for a 14-day period as required by the Nova Scotia government to stop the spread of COVID-19.

The decision from the Nova Scotia Real Estate Commission was released on Monday.

In July 2020, Adam Scott of HaliPad Real Estate Inc. showed a home still under construction to a prospective buyer.

Read more:
N.B. strips real estate agents’ licenses for taking ‘egregious advantage’ of senior

At the time, the Atlantic bubble was in effect and permitted residents of another province in the region to travel to another without any self-isolation requirements.

But the Nova Scotia Real Estate Commission found that the unnamed individual who was shown the home was from outside of Atlantic Canada and didn’t self-isolate for the full 14-day period.

Story continues below advertisement

When the house was shown a third person, a builder, was at the home.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

Chris Perkins, the owner of HaliPad, told Global News in a statement that no one had a positive case of COVID-19 and it was not transmitted during the showing.

“This is the first time we experienced COVID-19 protocols not being strictly followed and the agent has taken full accountability for his poor judgement,” he wrote.


Click to play video 'The New Reality: How COVID-19 could impact the commercial real estate market'



2:34
The New Reality: How COVID-19 could impact the commercial real estate market


The New Reality: How COVID-19 could impact the commercial real estate market – Jul 6, 2020

The real estate commission says it repeatedly informed its members through a number of various methods that they were required to follow the federal and provincial COVID-19 health regulations.

In this case, Scott did not, and the commission found that his actions violated the professional conduct standards of a real estate agent.

Story continues below advertisement

As a result, Scott’s licence has been suspended for a month or until Feb. 17 and he has been ordered to pay a $1,000 fine.

Read more:
B.C. realtor suspended after letting buyer move cash into her own bank account, avoiding regulators

Perkins says the company is deeply disappointed by the event and it served to underscore the importance of complying with COVID-19 regulations.

“We will continue to enforce our strict policy that agents will not attend (in-person) appointments with anyone who has not completed their mandatory isolation period.”

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending