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Health unit reports 29 new COVID cases in Simcoe County today – OrilliaMatters

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The Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit is reporting 30 new COVID-19 cases in the region today, at least 29 of which are Simcoe County residents. 

Almost half of the new cases reported today are Barrie residents with 14 new cases in the city. 

Of those 14 cases, nine are between the ages of 18 and 34 (one female and eight males). The transmission source is reported as close contact for five of those cases, one community-acquired, and one travel. The rest are still under investigation.

The remaining five Barrie cases include a woman between 35 and 44 years old, and two women and two men between 45 and 64 years old. The transmission sources for those cases include three community-acquired, one close contact, and one under investigation. 

The health unit is also tracking a community setting outbreak in Barrie involving a hockey team. There are at least eight positive cases linked to the outbreak. 

There are three new cases in Bradford West Gwillimbury, all linked to close contact. The cases include two men between 45 and 64 years old and a woman over the age of 80. 

Among the new cases is a Collingwood man aged 65 to 79 years old. His case transmission is still under investigation. This is the fifth local case since Nov. 20, and the other four cases have been linked to close contact or community transmission. 

There is also one new case in Innisfil today, a woman between 65 and 79 years old, and it remains under investigation. 

There are two new cases in Springwater, including a boy under 18 and a man between 35 and 44 years old. The boy’s case is linked to close contact and the man’s case is linked to an educational setting outbreak. 

There are six new cases in New Tecumseth, including one woman and two men between 18 and 34 years old, a man between 35 and 44 years old, and a woman and a man between 45 and 64 years old. The case transmission sources include two close contact, one community-acquired, and one linked to an educational setting outbreak out of the region. The remaining cases are under investigation. 

The health unit has confirmed one new case in Tiny, a man between 18 and 34 years old, which is reported as community-acquired. 

There is one new case in Essa today, a man between 18 and 34 years old, which is reported as community-acquired. 

Lastly, the health unit has reported one case, a man between 35 and 44, whose transmission source and location information is still pending. 

The Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit has reported a total of 1,983 cases of COVID-19, with 1,891 of those in Simcoe County. There are 1,717 cases listed as recovered in the region. Thirteen people are currently hospitalized, all are Simcoe County residents. The health unit has confirmed 52 deaths since March.

The incidence rate for Simcoe County is 358 cases per 100,000 people. With a seven-day average of 29.2 cases per 100,000 people in a week. The region’s reproductive rate shows every person who contracts COVID-19 transmits it to 1.1 other people, and testing data shows 2.1 per cent of people who are tested in the region test positive for COVID-19. 

Case breakdown from Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit by municipality for Simcoe County as of Nov. 26.

Municipality Total cases** Recoveries Deaths In Hospital Last case reported Incidence rate*
Barrie  591 504 15 10 Nov. 26 396
Bradford W-G  347 300 12 1 Nov. 26 808
New Tecumseth  337 289 12 1 Nov. 26 813
Innisfil 179 162 1 1 Nov. 26 439
Orillia 34 27 3   Nov. 23 102
Collingwood 26 21     Nov. 26 104
Wasaga Beach 35 31 1   Nov. 23 152
Clearview 34 32 1   Nov. 23 230
Springwater 40 23 1   Nov. 26 190
Midland 16 16     Nov. 19 89
Oro-Medonte 23 20 2   Nov. 12 99
Adjala-Tosorontio 37 34     Nov. 25 318
Essa 96 88 1 1 Nov. 26 401
Ramara 18 16     Nov. 18 173
Tiny 19 16     Nov. 23 137
Tay 27 23 1   Nov. 23 235
Penetanguishene 19 17 1   Nov. 19 196
Severn 13 12     Nov. 20 87
Georgian Bay 9 8     Nov. 24 319

 *Incidence rate is number of cases per 100,000 people in the local population.

**Total cases includes the number of cases currently recovering at home as well as any that have recovered, died, or are in hospital

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15 COVID-19 vaccines allegedly given to non-priority groups in Hamilton | News – Daily Hive

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Officials near Toronto are investigating after city staff allegedly doled out more than a dozen COVID-19 vaccines “inappropriately.”

In a release, Hamilton Public Health Services said it had received reports from staff that three employees had administered vaccines to non-priority groups.

Approximately 15 doses were given to ineligible individuals at a mobile vaccination clinic, the health unit said.

Under Ontario’s COVID-19 vaccination plan, only certain priority groups, such as those over the age of 80 and health care workers, are currently able to receive a vaccine.

“The City is committed to ensuring that COVID-19 vaccines are administered in a way that is fair, equitable, and based on criteria that prioritizes those that are most in need,” said Dr. Elizabeth Richardson, Hamilton’s Medical Officer of Health.

“Any actions designed to circumvent the vaccine program’s eligibility criteria are unethical and unacceptable.”

While the investigation continues, the three employees have been placed on paid leave, which the health united noted is standard practice.

The three employees have been placed on paid leave as the investigation continues, which the health unit noted is standard practice.

Hamilton Public Health Services said it would be reminding staff about their “professional obligation” to follow the province’s COVID-19 vaccine prioritization framework.

To date, Ontario has seen 308,296 COVID-19 cases and 7,067 virus-related deaths.

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Northern Health to open 30 COVID vaccine clinics for oldest residents, Indigenous seniors – Caledonia Courier

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Northern Health’s oldest residents, Indigenous seniors and elders will be able to book a COVID-19 vaccination starting on Monday (March 8) in 30 communities across the region.

The only people eligible to book appointments on Monday will be seniors aged 90 and up, Indigenous seniors aged 65 and up and Indigenous elders. There will be 30 clinics set up across 26 communities. Those wishing to sign up for a vaccine are asked to call only when their age bracket is eligible for a vaccine. Most clinics will use Pfizer vaccines, while a few will use the Modena vaccine.

Overall, Northern Health said it plans to vaccinate 15,000 people between March 15 and April 10 as part of the Phase Two effort. Vaccine clinics will operate at different times in different communities. To find out more, visit: https://www.northernhealth.ca/health-topics/covid-19-vaccine-plan.

To book, seniors, or someone calling on behalf of a senior, can call 1-844-255-7555 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. PT starting on Monday. Call centres will be open seven days a week. When calling, have the personal health number of the individual being vaccinated available. Be advised that staff will not ask for credit card information or payment.

Northern Health CEO Cathy Ulrich said that vaccine teams are already immunizing people who cannot travel to a clinic, and that callers will be asked if they can get to their clinic when they call. Northern Health will be keeping track of people who call in but miss their communities vaccine clinic dates and potentially return to that community later in Phase Two. People who miss Phase Two vaccinations in their own communities can travel to a neighbouring one or get vaccinated during Phase Three.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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48 COVID-19 vaccine clinics to open across Interior Health – Salmon Arm Observer – Salmon Arm Observer

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Forty-eight COVID-19 vaccine clinics will open across Interior Health (IH) in the coming weeks.

People aged 90 and over (those born before or in 1931), as well as Indigenous people over 65 (born in or before 1956) and elders, will be able to begin booking appointments Monday (March 8) through IH’s call centre at 1-877-740-7747. On March 15, that will open to people 85 and older (born in or before 1936) and on March 22, people over 80 (born in or before 1941) will be able to book their appointment to receive the first dose of the vaccine. The call centre will be open between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. every day.

After a person becomes eligible for the vaccine, they can book an appointment anytime. Eligible people looking to book an appointment can do so themselves or have another person book the appointment on their behalf.

Callers are asked to have on hand their legal name, date of birth, postal code, personal health number and current contact information, including a regularly-checked email address for booking confirmation.

READ MORE: Canada’s chief of public health hopeful as Health Canada approves 4th vaccine

READ MORE: Second COVID-19 outbreak declared at Kelowna General Hospital

The 48 clinics, located across the health authority’s widespread geographical boundaries, are set to open as soon as March 15 and deployment will be adapted as the vaccine rollout continues. A full list of clinics is available on IH’s website.

“The list you see today will be adjusted according to need,” said Karen Bloemink, IH’s vice president of pandemic response, during a press conference on Sunday (March 7).

To prepare for anticipated high call volumes, IH is asking people to stick to the outlined schedule to prevent a system overload. The health authority reassured there will be enough supply for all who want to be vaccinated.

“We would like to assure everyone that they will not miss their chance to get a vaccine if they want to get a vaccine,” said Bloemink.

IH will contact individuals when their second dose is due, after about four months, allowing them to make another appointment.

While IH expects the majority of individuals to come to clinics, it is working with known clients who need accommodations due to mobility issues. Those plans could involve home visits if required.

Despite the concerns of many regarding vaccine efficacy rates, recipients will not be able to choose which vaccine they get.

The majority of clinics will be offering the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines, which medical health officer Dr. Albert de Villiers said have comparable efficacy. The AstraZeneca vaccine will be reserved for younger people, and the use of the recently approved Johnson & Johnson vaccine is still to be determined within IH.

Those who are vaccinated in the next few weeks will still need to follow currently in-place health orders. De Villiers said in the coming months, he hopes visitation can increase.

“At this stage, the provincial health officer’s orders are still in place,” de Villiers said. “Even if you’ve got your vaccine, you should still follow all those orders.”

Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email: michael.rodriguez@kelownacapnews.com


@michaelrdrguez
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