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Help ensure seniors, newcomers are wary of online investment, romance scams – NewmarketToday.ca

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NEWS RELEASE
YORK REGIONAL POLICE
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Investigators with the York Regional Police Financial Crimes Unit would like to remind citizens to be wary of online investment and romance scams after an increase in incidents being reported.

Fraudsters have been targeting victims through messages on social media, emails, dating sites and online advertisements. Victims are often introduced to an investment opportunity or asked to receive money on behalf of the fraudster. In some cases, the fraudsters are claiming to know crypto-currency traders/investors or to be one themselves and they promise large returns. They will go as far as setting up websites where victims can log in and see funds in their accounts.

In many instances, these fraudsters are using fake names and identities or impersonating existing legal companies to solicit victims and to appear legitimate. The fraudster will continually ask for more money and fees and eventually, victims can’t get any of their invested money back.

In romance-type scams, fraudsters will build trust with a victim, then ask them to receive money and forward that money to others. In most cases, this money has been obtained from other online fraud victims and is essentially being laundered.

If someone is asking you to send cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, Litecoin, Etherum and other cryptocurrencies, be very cautious. These online investments and investors are not licensed or regulated in Ontario.

York Regional Police is reminding citizens to be cautious if you receive solicitations or notifications for any type of cryptocurrency trading or investing as this type of currency is designed to be anonymous and can rarely be tracked.

If a situation feels suspicious, trust your instincts never invest in something you do not fully understand or with people or businesses that you cannot confirm are legitimate. Do not receive money transfers or deposits from unknown persons. We encourage citizens to share fraud prevention tips with friends and family, especially seniors or newcomers to Canada, who are frequently the targeted victims of frauds and scams.

If you have been a victim of a fraud, and have lost money, report the incident promptly to the York Regional Police Financial Crimes Unit either online or by calling 1-866-876-5423, ext. 6627. To report frauds where no money has been lost, contact the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre online or by calling 1-888-495-8501.

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ROGER TAYLOR: CPP's investment head says sticking with oil and gas companies will help wind, solar development – Cape Breton Post

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Climate change is important to the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, but it’s not ready to divest of its holdings in conventional oil and gas.

Although a segment of the Canadian population may want the CPPIB to drop conventional energy, the board’s top spokesman says its investment decisions are not necessarily motivated by politics or a change in public policy.

Michel Leduc, CPPIB senior managing director and global head of public affairs and communications, said in a phone interview on Monday that conventional energy sources are not going away as quickly as some people may believe, and oil and gas will have a role in the global economy for some time to come.

Michel Leduc is senior managing director and global head of public affairs and communications at the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board. – Contributed

It is the investment board’s view that conventional oil and gas is still a good investment, providing a good return for years to come, said Leduc, and the board will maintain such investments.

The conventional oil and gas companies are making the switch to unconventional wind and solar energy themselves, Leduc argued, so if the CPPIB was to cut its investment in such companies it would actually help slow the transition from conventional to renewable energy.

The subject of energy may come up again Tuesday when Leduc hosts a CPPIB virtual town hall for Nova Scotians, during which he will explain what the investment board is doing with its $430-billion fund.

Every second year, the CPPIB holds public meetings individually for each province and the northern territories throughout October. Nova Scotia is the second last of year’s presentations.

There are a total of 20 million CPP contributors and beneficiaries in Canada and, of that, there are 461,799 contributors and 220,693 retirement beneficiaries in Nova Scotia.

Leduc said that despite the economic concern brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, the solvency and sustainability of the Canada Pension Plan is on solid footing for at least the next 75 years.

Before the creation of the CPPIB in 1997, the Canada Pension Plan was 100 per cent invested in government debt, Leduc said. To better prepare for so-called black swan events, such as a pandemic, the investment board has diversified the fund.

The fund is invested in three broad categories: 20 per cent in fixed income, which is mainly sovereign bonds and provincial bonds; 53 per cent in equities, both publicly traded stocks and private companies wholly controlled by the CPPIB; and the remainder would be in real assets, which includes toll roads, commercial real estate and ports, which provide steady income for a long period.

Geographically, only about 15 per cent of the CPPIB’s investments are in Canada, Leduc said, and about 85 per cent is invested across the developed economies of the world.

Considering that Canada represents only about three per cent of global markets, most of the CPPIB investments are outside of the country to be fully diversified and protect the fund from downturns in the Canadian economy.

The largest portion of the outside investments are in the United States, followed by Europe, Japan, South Korea and then developing countries, which includes China, India, Brazil, Mexico, Chile and Colombia.

In Canada, the fund is invested in both conventional and renewable energy, the financial sector and technology, including Ottawa-based tech darling Shopify, Leduc said.

The CPPIB has a 50 per cent holding in the 401 toll highway in Ontario, which has proven to be the investment board’s biggest return on investment so far, he said.

In Nova Scotia, the fund has investments in Empire Co. Ltd., parent of the Sobeys grocery chain, and Crombie REIT, both of which are controlled by the founding Sobey family of Pictou County.

Internationally, the CPPIB owns 23 ports in the United Kingdom, which also provide steady income over a long period.


CPPIB VIRTUAL TOWN HALL

The virtual Canada Pension Plan Investment Board town halls are accessed at cppinvestments.com/publicmeetings. The Nova Scotia session is scheduled for today from noon to 1 p.m.

To join, click the link for the meeting and register with an email address. Registrants will get a response and can submit a question in advance.

In Nova Scotia, 461,799 residents are CPP contributors (47.9 per cent of the provincial population) and 220,693 are CPP retirement beneficiaries (22.9 per cent of the population).

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Jarvis: A massive, game-changing investment – Windsor Star

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Article content continued

So the third shift is forecast to return in 2024, when mass production of the new vehicle begins. All 425 workers still laid off are expected to have the opportunity to be recalled plus another 1,500 are expected to be hired.

Here’s the but.

Workers will have to weather more layoffs before more jobs come back.

“We’ve got another down week coming. That’s already been announced,” said Dias. “I wish I could say with conviction that everything is going to be fine after the down week, but I really can’t say that.”

Everything is tied to consumer demand. Minivan sales are stable now, he said, “but it’s not like it was.”

There are also questions about the investment, said Automotive News Canada reporter John Irwin.

Normally, when negotiations lead to a new investment, that investment happens before the contract expires. Mass production of the new vehicle announced as part of this contract won’t start until 2024, after the contract expires.

But retooling for the new product will start in 2023, before the contract expires, Dias said.

The auto industry makes these decisions four to five years in advance, he said.

“If we had waited another three years to talk about this investment, it probably would have been in Mexico,” he said.

The agreement also doesn’t identify the vehicle to be produced, only that it will be a plug-in hybrid “and/or” battery-powered electric vehicle.

A key feature is that the platform will be flexible enough to build cars, crossovers or pickups, Dias said.

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ROGER TAYLOR: CPP's investment head says sticking with oil and gas companies will help wind, solar development – The Journal Pioneer

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Climate change is important to the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, but it’s not ready to divest of its holdings in conventional oil and gas.

Although a segment of the Canadian population may want the CPPIB to drop conventional energy, the board’s top spokesman says its investment decisions are not necessarily motivated by politics or a change in public policy.

Michel Leduc, CPPIB senior managing director and global head of public affairs and communications, said in a phone interview on Monday that conventional energy sources are not going away as quickly as some people may believe, and oil and gas will have a role in the global economy for some time to come.

Michel Leduc is senior managing director and global head of public affairs and communications at the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board.  - Contributed
Michel Leduc is senior managing director and global head of public affairs and communications at the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board. – Contributed

It is the investment board’s view that conventional oil and gas is still a good investment, providing a good return for years to come, said Leduc, and the board will maintain such investments.

The conventional oil and gas companies are making the switch to unconventional wind and solar energy themselves, Leduc argued, so if the CPPIB was to cut its investment in such companies it would actually help slow the transition from conventional to renewable energy.

The subject of energy may come up again Tuesday when Leduc hosts a CPPIB virtual town hall for Nova Scotians, during which he will explain what the investment board is doing with its $430-billion fund.

Every second year, the CPPIB holds public meetings individually for each province and the northern territories throughout October. Nova Scotia is the second last of year’s presentations.

There are a total of 20 million CPP contributors and beneficiaries in Canada and, of that, there are 461,799 contributors and 220,693 retirement beneficiaries in Nova Scotia.

Leduc said that despite the economic concern brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, the solvency and sustainability of the Canada Pension Plan is on solid footing for at least the next 75 years.

Before the creation of the CPPIB in 1997, the Canada Pension Plan was 100 per cent invested in government debt, Leduc said. To better prepare for so-called black swan events, such as a pandemic, the investment board has diversified the fund.

The fund is invested in three broad categories: 20 per cent in fixed income, which is mainly sovereign bonds and provincial bonds; 53 per cent in equities, both publicly traded stocks and private companies wholly controlled by the CPPIB; and the remainder would be in real assets, which includes toll roads, commercial real estate and ports, which provide steady income for a long period.

Geographically, only about 15 per cent of the CPPIB’s investments are in Canada, Leduc said, and about 85 per cent is invested across the developed economies of the world.

Considering that Canada represents only about three per cent of global markets, most of the CPPIB investments are outside of the country to be fully diversified and protect the fund from downturns in the Canadian economy.

The largest portion of the outside investments are in the United States, followed by Europe, Japan, South Korea and then developing countries, which includes China, India, Brazil, Mexico, Chile and Colombia.

In Canada, the fund is invested in both conventional and renewable energy, the financial sector and technology, including Ottawa-based tech darling Shopify, Leduc said.

The CPPIB has a 50 per cent holding in the 401 toll highway in Ontario, which has proven to be the investment board’s biggest return on investment so far, he said.

In Nova Scotia, the fund has investments in Empire Co. Ltd., parent of the Sobeys grocery chain, and Crombie REIT, both of which are controlled by the founding Sobey family of Pictou County.

Internationally, the CPPIB owns 23 ports in the United Kingdom, which also provide steady income over a long period.


CPPIB VIRTUAL TOWN HALL

The virtual Canada Pension Plan Investment Board town halls are accessed at cppinvestments.com/publicmeetings. The Nova Scotia session is scheduled for today from noon to 1 p.m.

To join, click the link for the meeting and register with an email address. Registrants will get a response and can submit a question in advance.

In Nova Scotia, 461,799 residents are CPP contributors (47.9 per cent of the provincial population) and 220,693 are CPP retirement beneficiaries (22.9 per cent of the population).

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