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Homeless support is growing labour sector in Canada

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As homelessness in Canada grows, the number of workers in the homelessness support sector has also been increasing.

According to Statistics Canada, the sector saw a 60.7 per cent increase in workers between 2016 and 2021, when there were 10,130 people employed in the field. StatCan says that this outpaced the growth in all other sectors by 3.4 per cent.

The majority of homelessness support workers lived in larger urban areas (70.8 per cent), with over half working in Ontario (4,000 workers) and B.C. (2,270 workers). Nearly half of all workers were in Canada’s largest cities: Toronto (15.6 per cent), Vancouver (12.3 per cent), Montréal (8.2 per cent), Edmonton (4.4 per cent), Ottawa–Gatineau (4.3 per cent) and Calgary (3.8 per cent). Nine per cent of workers were in rural areas.

“The homelessness support sector provides support to individuals experiencing homelessness, and to individuals accessing services that are targeted toward those at risk of facing housing crises,” StatCan said in a report released on Wednesday. “Homelessness support sector workers can be found in the community food and housing, and emergency and other relief services industry.”

Nearly three quarters of workers in this sector were women (73.8 per cent) according to 2021 Census data, compared to just under half (48.2 per cent) in all occupations. Nearly eighty per cent more men entered the sector between 2016 and 2021, bringing the total to 2,655 men and 7,475 women.

The fastest growing age cohort were workers aged 15 to 24, which more than doubled in size from 625 to 1,455. Workers in one-parent family households also increased by 94 per cent.

Eleven per cent of workers had an Indigenous identity, a 65.7 per cent increase over 2016. Over one in four workers (28.4 per cent) were part of a racialized group, a 134.1 per cent increase.

Almost four out of 10 (39.8 per cent) had a bachelor’s degree, an 82.6 per cent increase over 2016, including nearly one in ten who held a graduate degree.

Homeless workers were also more likely to live in poverty (6.7 per cent) than all other sectors (six per cent). Their median employment income was $34,000 in 2020; a 3.4 per cent reduction from 2016. In the same period, all other sectors saw a four per cent increase to $41,200, not adjusted for inflation.

More than 235,000 people in Canada experience homelessness in any given year, according to previous StatCan data, a number that’s beengrowing but difficult to calculate.

 

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Doug Ford once again calls on Bank of Canada to lower interest rates – CP24

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Doug Ford once again calls on Bank of Canada to lower interest rates  CP24

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'Stars are aligning' for Bank of Canada rate cut: economists – CTV News

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‘Stars are aligning’ for Bank of Canada rate cut: economists  CTV News

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Member of Canada Soccer support team detained in France for alleged drone use

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PARIS – The Canadian Olympic Committee says a “non-accredited” member of Canada Soccer’s support team has been detained by French authorities in Saint-Étienne for allegedly using a drone to record New Zealand’s women’s soccer team during practice.

The New Zealand Olympic Committee said in a statement Tuesday that team support members alerted police after a drone was flown over the women’s soccer team’s practice on Monday, leading to the detention.

The NZOC said it registered a complaint with the International Olympic Committee’s integrity unit and asked Canada for a full review.

The COC said in a statement released Tuesday it is “shocked and disappointed” over the allegation and apologized to the NZOC and New Zealand Football.

“The Canadian Olympic Committee stands for fair-play and we are shocked and disappointed,” the statement said. “We offer our heartfelt apologies to New Zealand Football, to all the players affected, and to the New Zealand Olympic Committee.”

Canada, the defending Olympic women’s soccer champion, is scheduled to open its tournament against 28th ranked New Zealand on Friday in Saint-Étienne.

The COC said it is reviewing next steps with the IOC, Paris 2024, Canada Soccer and FIFA. The COC said it will provide an update Wednesday.

“Canada Soccer is working closely and cooperatively with the Canadian Olympic Committee on the matter involving the Women’s National Team,” Canada Soccer communications chief Paulo Senra said it a statement. “Next steps are being reviewed with the IOC, Paris 2024, and FIFA. We will provide an update (Wednesday).”

It’s not the first time a Canadian soccer team has been involved in a drone controversy involving an international rival’s training session.

In 2021 at Toronto, Honduras stopped a training session ahead of its men’s World Cup qualifier against Canada after spotting a drone above the field, according to reports in Honduran media. The teams played to a 1-1 draw.

French security forces guarding Paris 2024 sites are intercepting an average of six drones per day, Prime Minister Gabriel Attal said Tuesday.

Attal added the drones are often operated by “individuals, maybe tourists wanting to take pictures.”

“That’s why it’s important to remind people of the rules. There’s a ban on flying drones,” he said, according to multiple news outlets.

“Systems are in place to allow us to very quickly intercept (drones) and arrest their operators.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 23, 2024.

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.



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