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How and where to watch upcoming solar eclipse – a ‘rare celestial event’

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The eclipse will peak at 3:19 in Toronto

The total solar eclipse slated to darken Ontario’s skies on April 8 will provide a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see such a celestial event.

The last total solar eclipse visible in our province was in 1979 and the next one will be in 2099.

In other words, this is not one to miss.

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“A total solar eclipse is when the moon aligns perfectly between the Earth and the sun, casting its shadow onto our planet and creating a path of totality,” said Daliah Bibas, the Ontario Science Centre’s astronomy and space sciences researcher-programmer.

“And this path of totality will be over Mexico, the United States and Canada. It is a once in a lifetime opportunity to witness this for sure,” added Bibas. “So it’ll be a pretty spectacular view. I think it’s so important because these rare celestial events bring people together to watch and witness and reflect on our place in the cosmos.”

The eclipse will be visible in Toronto between 2:04 p.m. and 4:31 p.m., with the peak occurring at 3:19 p.m.

But don’t look directly at the eclipse without the protection of safe solar view glasses or a filter that meets the international standard — ISO 12312-2 — or through appropriate handheld solar eclipse viewers or lenses.

“Sunglasses — no matter how dark they are — are not safe to use during an eclipse, even if you’re at 99% totality,” said Bibas.

“It’s important to use solar eclipse glasses that are ISO compliant, which is an international standard, which ensures the filters meet strict safety requirements for viewing the sun.”

 

If you plan to view the eclipse in Toronto, Bibas recommended going to a location which provides an open view of the sky such as a park or maybe even a backyard.

“We are actually encouraging people to watch the solar eclipse safely from home or go to the path of totality, which is so close,” said Bibas. “Cities like Hamilton and Fort Erie and Niagara Falls, Oakville, Burlington — all of the cities — are in the path of totality. So we’re encouraging people to take a little field trip and view the total solar eclipse there.”

Bibas said eclipse viewers may also notice or hear nocturnal animals like frogs and crickets come out during the darkness, and to see day dwellers like birds go to sleep or stay quiet until the light returns.

The Ontario Science Centre will have pre-eclipse programming on April 6–7, at the Special Exhibition Hall, level 6, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

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Google celebrates the 2024 total solar eclipse with new 'Doodle', animation – Yahoo News Canada

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Google celebrates the 2024 total solar eclipse with new ‘Doodle’, animation

Click here to view the video

Canada’s most anticipated solar event of 2024 is finally happening, and all eyes will be (safely, we ask) on the skies! A solar eclipse will be visible over North America, with the coveted path of totality falling over parts of Eastern Canada.

DON’T MISS: Everything you need to know for April’s spectacular and rare solar eclipse

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HubPage - Solar Eclipse - Timetable1HubPage - Solar Eclipse - Timetable1

HubPage – Solar Eclipse – Timetable1

The last time a solar eclipse swept over North America was in August of 2017; however, any Canadians who wanted to view the spectacle had to travel south of the border to do so. The most recent solar eclipse over Canada was in 2008, with only some folks in Nunavut getting to see the event.

Now, sixteen years later, American and Canadian skies will once again see the Moon and Sun align, and to celebrate the occasion, Google has released a special new ‘Doodle’ and animation.

Each letter in the word ‘GOOGLE’ can be seen looking up at the sky while wearing protective eclipse glasses, except for ‘E’, who is sleeping.

Clicking on the Doodle will take users to an automatic search result for “Total Eclipse 2024” and feature an animation of the Moon passing in front of the Sun.

WATCH: April 8, 2024 solar eclipse Google Doodle animation

Click here to view the video

Folks who miss this eclipse will have to wait another twenty years before Canada sees another total eclipse, but it won’t be Eastern Canada plunged into the shadow. In fact, another total solar eclipse won’t travel over Eastern Canada again until 2079.

Stay with The Weather Network for everything eclipse-related and share your eclipse photos with us, here, or use the hashtag #ShareYourWeather on social media.

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People fear going blind after witnessing Total Solar Eclipse without eye protection – Geo News

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Doctors see surge in eye-related injuries days after Total Solar Eclipse. 

It hasn’t been long since the day when some lucky Earthlings witnessed this year’s Total Solar Eclipse but doctors, in areas that fell in the path of totality, have reported a surge in cases of eye-related injuries.

The number of people with eye-related injuries jumped while one doctor in New York City says she treated a number of patients with eye pain, the New York Post reported.

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“I had several patients come in panicking saying ‘I don’t want to go blind,'” Dr Janette Nesheiwat, a New York City-based double board-certified doctor tells Fox News Digital. “I couldn’t believe it, people actually looked at the eclipse without protection.”

Doctors and eye specialists had continuously advised people not to directly look at the sun during the solar eclipse without protection equipment like solar eclipse glasses as that could cause severe vision damage.

However, some did not heed the warning.

According to the New York Post, Google searches for “hurt eyes” and “why do my eyes hurt after the eclipse” rose after the moon and sun aligned on Monday.

Nesheiwat says the sun’s rays can burn the retina and damage the macula, the part of the retina at the back of the eye that is responsible for central vision.

According to a spokesperson for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Center for Health Statistics does not have any data on eye damage following the eclipse.

But Nesheiwat says she treated up to eight patients in Midtown Manhattan, with one patient looking at the sun either directly or through his phone for about 10 minutes, she says.

“The damage can be irreversible if the retina is severely damaged by looking directly at the without proper eye protection. Some people may have mild symptoms if the exposure to the sun was brief.”

Even while the great majority of people took safety precautions when viewing the eclipse, it’s possible that some people used solar eclipse glasses that were recalled because of being fake. 

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Solar eclipse: Some Ontario hospitals, eye-care professionals report increase of calls – CityNews Kitchener

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It has been a few days since a total solar eclipse passed over parts of Ontario, but ever since the celestial event captured the attention of many there has been an increase in reports of eye pain.

CityNews contacted several hospitals in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area to ask about potential patient increases after Google saw an increase in searches related to eclipse eye damage and eye pain.

In the lead-up to Monday’s eclipse, health authorities urged people to use specialized, ISO-rated glasses to safely view the eclipse.

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The Donald K. Johnson Eye Institute, located at the University Health Network’s Toronto Western Hospital, was one of the health care institutions that reported an uptick in calls beginning on Tuesday. Officials didn’t provide specifics on the number of calls.

“Complaints about blurry vision and concerns that maybe they had looked inadvertently at the sun or had looked at the sun by mistake,” Dr. Marisa Sit, a comprehensive ophthalmologist at the institute, told CityNews.

“Am I surprised there’s an uptick? No, with any kind of major event there [are] people will react in different ways.”

Eye damage and pain symptoms typically occur several hours after exposure to harmful light. While many can experience a more minor irritation, there’s a concern about solar retinopathy which occurs after light hurts and damages the retinas.

Symptoms of solar retinopathy include blurry vision, seeing spots in the front of your eyes or wavy lines, observing distorted colours and seeing darkened spots where the harmful light came from.

“There is really no medical or surgical treatment that we can offer you,” Sit said.

“If you were to have solar retinopathy, we can observe it over time and hopefully it does improve and resolve on its own. If it does not improve on its own, then it can be left with permanent deficits.”

Dr. Josephine Pepe, the president of the Ontario Association of Optometrists, said she and other association members have been “getting more calls than before,” but it’s something she welcomed.

“I think it’s really important that patients call to make sure that their eyes are OK. Most patients are fine and they just need some reassurance,” Pepe told CityNews, adding minor symptoms like dry eyes can be treated.

“We’ve had anecdotes of patients who just didn’t notice that they needed glasses and they went to cover one eye and because they’re more sensitive and thinking about their eyes more because of the eclipse … so they went and got their eyes checked and they needed glasses.”

She noted it appeared many listened to the warnings about taking the proper precautions during the eclipse.

Pepe added that anyone concerned about solar retinopathy could get an optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan to get a 3D image of the back of the eye.

With the focus on eye health for some, Pepe and Sit encouraged people to get eye exams regularly. Two-year intervals for adults and more frequent checks for youth were recommended.

Another recommendation was to wear sunglasses with UVA and UVB protection while outside and to wear sunglasses not just when it’s sunny.

“Sure the clouds help a little bit, but you still can get a lot of UV damage,” Pepe said.

Pepe suggested investing more in sunglasses as more affordable ones can see UV protection rub off. She also said polarized glasses can offer additional protection dealing with sun reflections off water and snow.

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