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How Holland College students are having their annual art show at the Confed Centre despite COVID-19 – CBC.ca

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Instructors at the Holland College School of Visual Arts in Charlottetown have created a virtual art gallery so students can showcase their work in a show called All About Hue, despite the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Students from the graphic design, fundamental art, video game art and animation and photography and videography programs usually display their work in the Confederation Centre of the Arts art gallery, but not this year — due to the pandemic, the space has been closed since March 16.

“In many ways this is the most important event in their entire time at Holland College,” program manager Liam Corcoran told CBC Radio: Mainstreet P.E.I.‘s Matt Rainnie. 

“It’s where they go to showcase the best of what they’ve done for everybody. So once this whole situation happened and you know there was the fear that there wouldn’t be the show. That was a huge blow to them.

“It’s a great partnership and a really big deal for them to have their art in a national art gallery.”

Corcoran said the programs’ instructors rallied around students when it was clear the showcase could not go ahead in the physical space.

“On top of doing their distance teaching, they’ve also been working tirelessly to get all the students’ work into this virtual space,” he said.

“Tiffany Baxter kind of took the lead on the video game side. She essentially created a little video game that looks exactly like the gallery. Each program has their own section where the students have put up the best work.”

Corcoran warns that since it is a video game, it will be challenging to use on mobile devices and some computer systems, but said there are also PDF versions if people have trouble gaining access.

“There’s something for everybody there, fans of visual art,” he said. 

“I think it’s going to bring a lot of joy to people at this time, and of course … It’s the start of their professional career, especially those that are graduating … it’s the beginning of their professional portfolios.”

All About Hue can be accessed through Holland College’s website. 

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Art and Entertainment should not have the Limitation of the Boundary – Net Newsledger

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Today, when the entire world is running after a mundane lifestyle, the artists are the only souls who fill up their life. They project complex notions and performances as they breathe life into the world.

Bahadır Ünlü is a Turkish actor who plays a crucial role in spreading positivity and entertaining millions with his witty thoughts and stellar performances. He firmly believes that entertainment and Art should not have any boundaries, both metaphorically and physically. He explained, “Art and entertainment are kindred spirits. People should be able to experience them without any restrictions or inhibitions. Boundaries should be blurred, and people should come together.” Bahadir is a leading actor in Turkey, and he is keen to explore international projects and reach a broader audience.

Now his ambition is to reach out to the global audience so that he can connect with them through his Art as an actor. He is also a social influencer and enjoys interacting with his audience, fans, and followers. He enjoys social media as it is a medium that also transcends boundaries.

The actor, director life, was not a bed of roses. Bahadir has also gone through some challenging times, but experience taught him the critical aspects of life, and he knows how to connect the dots to achieve new heights. He believes that the best way to approach life is by being optimistic in the face of adversity. According to Bahadir, artists and entertainers are not bound by borders, and it is entirely correct. Bahadir believes that art and entertainment as mediums have the power to reach millions of people, surpassing boundaries like language, distance, and culture.

Bahadir has more than 600 thousand followers who regularly follow him on Instagram. Bahadır Ünlü has been very active recently on his social media. Bahadir has numerous upcoming international projects and is excited to reach out to a brand new audience, with whom he can connect and interact. Bahadir’s devotion to his Art is commendable as he continues to grow and evolve as an actor and director.

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Crunch time coming for Coast Art Crawl – Coast Reporter

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The organizers of the Sunshine Coast Art Crawl face the biggest decision in the event’s decade-long history: Do they hope for a continuing flattening of B.C.’s pandemic curve and proceed with the Art Crawl this October, or call it off? 

The Coast Cultural Alliance (CCA), the non-profit group that organizes the lucrative Coast-wide project, has sought opinions on the matter from 265 vendors involved in last year’s Art Crawl. The CCA asked them to fill out a five-question, multiple-choice survey and submit it by May 30. 

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A key question was, “At this time, how do you feel about participating in the 2020 Art Crawl?” Possible answers included, “definite yes, but not in my own home,” “definite yes in my studio/home working with October Provincial Health Guidelines,” “definite no,” and “maybe.” 

Linda Williams, the CCA board member who takes the lead on the Art Crawl, told Coast Reporter that most replies were yet to come in and, while there were many positive responses, the interim results were inconclusive. Williams added that there were several suggestions as to how to make the Art Crawl work and keep everyone safe, so she remains positive the Oct. 23 to 25 event might happen. 

Williams said the traditional July 15 deadline for vendors to sign up and pay fees could be extended another few weeks to provide as much time as possible for an informed decision. Reminders are usually sent out to vendors in June. “But if we have enough [survey responses] that are ‘definitely no,’ we won’t put that call out,” Williams said. 

Purple Banners, seen from Langdale to Lund, signal that artists are at work and their creations are for sale. – RIK JESPERSEN PHOTO

Calling off the event would be another blow to hundreds of local artists, already suffering from a lack of studio visits due to ongoing concern about the spread of COVID-19. Last year’s Art Crawl generated more than $450,000 in direct sales. And, like the Sunshine Coast Festival of the Written Arts and the Rogue Arts Festival, both held in August and both cancelled this year, the Art Crawl attracts many off-Coast visitors who spend on accommodation, food and other goods and attractions. The absence of that spending would be felt across much of the Coast economy. 

The CCA board has another task to complete before the Art Crawl decision is made – completing the 2020-21 Purple Banner brochure and map. The online and hard-copy guides are an effective marketing tool for arts studios and galleries from Langdale to Lund. The banners – purple flags emblazoned with a white eye-icon – can hang off participating businesses year-round. “Wherever you see a Purple Banner, the arts are at work. In many cases, but not always, the banner is an invitation to drop in,” the CCA says in its publicity. Unlike the Art Crawl, vendors’ information in the guide can specify that would-be visitors must call ahead, so studio owners can specify a time and prepare for visits, important in this time of plague. 

Williams noted that, while the Art Crawl is a hugely important, three-day event, the Purple Banner Guide is in distribution, and paying potential dividends, for 12 months. “If artists and vendors definitely don’t want to go into the Art Crawl, the Purple Guide is another opportunity for them,” Williams said. About 20,000 brochures are printed every year. The deadline for inclusion is usually May, but that also has been extended for one month. You can lean more about the Purple Banner program at the CCA’s website, suncoastarts.com

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Start Your Engines: Toronto will host the world's first drive-in art exhibit – Driving

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The COVID-19 pandemic is proving what driving enthusiasts already know: that a car is the best private place when going out in public.

It’s why the car became the solution when a long-planned van Gogh art exhibit in Toronto, Immersive van Gogh, was suddenly sidelined by the province’s closures. Now the show will kick off with an event dubbed Gogh by Car, in what its organizers believe is the world’s first drive-in art exhibit.

“This show is meant to be seen on foot, not in the car, but we realize that we have to pivot and go with this situation,” said Svetlana Dvoretsky, the show’s co-producer. “We’re opening (with) the drive-in, and for people who can’t wait to get out of the house and do something, it’s perfect.”

The show can go on this way because it isn’t set up like a regular art exhibit. Cars won’t cruise in a line past paintings hung on the wall. Instead, it’s an immersive audio and video show that tries to imagine van Gogh’s creative processes, and takes the viewer along a journey from blank canvas to finished painting.

“We purchased the license for over 400 different images from various museums around the world, and those images were layered and became the details that were put together digitally,” Dvoretsky said.


The producers of the Immersive van Gogh event expect to open to walk-in visitors, but initially it’ll be in-car only.

Immersive van Gogh

Planning for the Toronto event started more than a year ago. The digital projections are massive, and require walls at least six metres high. One of the issues was finding a venue large enough for the display — and that would turn out to be key to the drive-in alternative. The Toronto Star originally printed its newspapers on-site at its offices at 1 Yonge Street. With the presses long gone, that giant space and its 15-metre-high walls were perfect for the exhibit.

In those pre-COVID days, parking in downtown Toronto was expensive and hard to find, and that created the spark for the drive-in event. “When we were starting our construction on-site, we were parking anywhere we could outside,” Dvoretsky said. “One of our construction managers said, ‘You can just drive in like we do,’ and he showed us the way through the loading dock so we could drive our cars into our space.”

When the producers got the news that the exhibit couldn’t open to the public in mid-May as planned, “it hit us that if we could drive in, we could get our customers to drive in,” Dvoretsky said. “So we started to completely rethink the whole concept. We had to redo things, get permits and insurance, and get an exhaust system put in place. It was quite a process, but we managed to do it.”

The show runs in a 35-minute loop. Normally, walk-in visitors would be able to browse a lobby display, watch the loops at their leisure, and even climb a catwalk to see it from another angle.

Instead, fourteen cars will be admitted for each show, with occupants watching the loop once before moving out for the next group to drive in. The setup can accommodate everything except large SUVs and minivans — meaning you can’t go in a van to see van Gogh.

The show runs to the end of September, but for now, the drive-in is scheduled for June 18 to 28. The organizers are hoping they’ll be able to admit walk-in visitors after that, but Dvoretsky said that if shutdown measures are still in place, the drive-in will be extended. Those who paid to see the show from their cars will be able to walk through the event when it opens, using the same ticket. The drive-in event is sold out, but there’s a waiting list for tickets if someone cancels.

This show is meant to be seen on foot, but we realized we have to pivot and go with this situation —Svetlana Dvoretsky, co-producer

Gogh by Car might be the world’s only drive-in art exhibit, but it’s not the first event to take advantage of the isolation offered by a vehicle’s cabin. The Toronto Zoo has set up a 3.4-kilometre route that lets visitors drive past some of the exhibits to see the animals inside.

Of course, that’s old news to African Lion Safari, near Hamilton, Ontario, which has been operating as the opposite of a traditional zoo since 1969. Lions roam free throughout the park, while visitors roll up their car windows and drive by them — although some get out past the gates to survey any damage after experiencing the baboons, who tend to be fascinated with windshield wipers.

While they’ve been on the critically-endangered list for many years, drive-in movie theatres are also poised to make a comeback. While there aren’t many left, some of the remaining ones are opening in provinces and states that have lifted restrictions, often showing classic films when they can’t get more recent blockbusters. The vehicles are spaced farther apart, and popcorn and treats must be ordered in advance, but it’s a night out at a time when indoor movie theatres remain out of bounds.

And while viewing van Gogh’s starry nights and sunflowers from a car will be temporary, then even when social distancing is done, there might be enough interest for drive-ins to come back from the brink and become popular once more.

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