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Intermittent fasting may help you live longer and improve overall health – Daily Mail

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Restricting eating times to just 6-8 hours every day could help you live longer and fight obesity, diabetes and cancer, according to study on Intermittent fasting

  • While many fad diets, like keto, have been proven unsustainable or even, in some cases, harmful, intermittent fasting has by and large held up to scientific testing 
  • Intermittent fasting consists of either daily time-restricted feeding of 6-8 hours or 5:2 fasting, where people eat one moderate-sized meal two days each week
  • Johns Hopkins University neuroscientist Dr Mark Mattson says in new study that benefits of fasting regimen includes improvements in ‘glucose regulation’
  • Intermittent fasting also improves blood pressure and heart rate, study shows  
  • Mattson also writes that ‘intermittent fasting could be part of a healthy lifestyle’

A new study has revealed that intermittent fasting may help you live longer and improve your overall health. 

While many fad diets, such as keto, have been proven unsustainable or even, in some cases, harmful, intermittent fasting has by and large held up to scientific testing. 

Intermittent fasting diets, fall generally into two categories: daily time-restricted feeding, which narrows eating times to 6-8 hours per day, and the so-called 5:2 intermittent fasting, in which people limit themselves to one moderate-sized meal two days each week.  

According to a recent study published in The New England Journal of Medicine, the benefits of intermittent fasting includes improvements in ‘glucose regulation, blood pressure, and heart rate’.

In the study, Johns Hopkins University neuroscientist Dr Mark Mattson writes that intermittent fasting may be able to help many health conditions like obesity, diabetes, mellitus, cardiovascular disease and cancers. 

A new study has revealed that intermittent fasting may help you live longer and improve your overall health. While many fad diets, like keto, have been proven unsustainable or even, in some cases, harmful, intermittent fasting has by and large held up to scientific testing

A new study has revealed that intermittent fasting may help you live longer and improve your overall health. While many fad diets, like keto, have been proven unsustainable or even, in some cases, harmful, intermittent fasting has by and large held up to scientific testing

For example, the American Heart Association estimates that 47 million people in the US have metabolic syndrome, a network of symptoms that often precedes diabetes. 

About a third of US adults at least three of five risk factors that make up metabolic syndrome: high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high triglyceride levels, low levels of ‘good,’ HDL cholesterol and abdominal obesity. 

About 85 per cent of people who have this network of symptoms also have type 2 diabetes. 

Those with both conditions are at far greater risk of developing heart disease or suffering strokes as well. 

But intermittent fasting could reduce risks of diabetes. Fasting can also increase stress resistance and suppress inflammation, according to the paper. 

Mattson, who has studied the health impact of intermittent fasting for 25 years, and adopted it himself about 20 years ago, writes that ‘intermittent fasting could be part of a healthy lifestyle’.

According to Mattson, preliminary studies suggest that intermittent fasting could benefit brain health too. 

Mattson referred to a clinical trial at the University of Toronto in April that found that 220 healthy, non-obese adults who maintained a calorie restricted diet for two years ‘showed signs of improved memory in a battery of cognitive tests’. 

In the study, Johns Hopkins University neuroscientist Dr Mark Mattson writes that intermittent fasting may be able to help many health conditions like obesity, diabetes, mellitus, cardiovascular disease and cancers

In the study, Johns Hopkins University neuroscientist Dr Mark Mattson writes that intermittent fasting may be able to help many health conditions like obesity, diabetes, mellitus, cardiovascular disease and cancers

In the study, Johns Hopkins University neuroscientist Dr Mark Mattson writes that intermittent fasting may be able to help many health conditions like obesity, diabetes, mellitus, cardiovascular disease and cancers

Noting that far more research needs to be done ‘to prove any effects of intermittent fasting on learning and memory’, Mattson says if that proof is found, the fasting – or a pharmaceutical equivalent that mimics it – ‘may offer interventions that can stave off neurodegeneration and dementia’.

‘We are at a transition point where we could soon consider adding information about intermittent fasting to medical school curricula alongside standard advice about healthy diets and exercise,’ he said.  

Mattson says the new study is intended to help clarify the science and clinical applications of intermittent fasting in ways that may help physicians guide patients who want to try it.

He says that with some guidance and patience, most people can incorporate the fasting regimens into their lives. 

‘Patients should be advised that feeling hungry and irritable is common initially and usually passes after two weeks to a month as the body and brain become accustomed to the new habit,’ Mattson says. 

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Dentists, teachers disappointed they won’t be prioritized for vaccine in B.C. – Global News

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Dentists, bus drivers and teachers are among the essential workers who are disappointed they won’t be given priority to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in British Columbia.

B.C. rolled out its vaccination plan on Friday, revealing that after the most vulnerable groups have been immunized, shots will be given out according to age, with the oldest residents first in line.

That means many people who have not been able to work from home during the pandemic, including grocery store workers, police officers and mail carriers, will have to wait to get the vaccine along with others in their age group.

Read more:
Boost school safety if B.C. teachers won’t get COVID-19 vaccine early, union says

The British Columbia Dental Association has written a letter to Premier John Horgan strongly urging him to include dentists in Stage 2 of the vaccination plan, alongside family doctors and medical specialists.

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“Dentistry is an essential service. More importantly, dental care, including aerosol-generating dental procedures, are provided to patients who cannot wear a mask during treatment,” said association president Dr. Anthony Nadolski in the letter.






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B.C. teachers and grocery store workers won’t get COVID-19 shots early


B.C. teachers and grocery store workers won’t get COVID-19 shots early

“B.C. dentists continue to do everything they can to ensure dental offices are safe for patients and staff. Early access to vaccines will ensure continued access to urgent and emergency dental care.”

Other agencies such as the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have included dentists and dental workers in Stage 2 along with doctors and specialists not directly involved in providing care to COVID-19 patients, Nadolski added.

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More recently, Ontario included dentistry in its second stage because dentists generally provide in-person care and many dental procedures are urgent and cannot be delayed, he said.

The B.C. Ministry of Health did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Sunday.

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The province initially suggested that people delivering essential services such as teachers, grocery store workers and those in law enforcement could be prioritized to get the vaccine.

But when the finalized plan was released on Friday, Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said scientific evidence supports an age-based approach because older populations are at much higher risk of infection and death from COVID-19.


Click to play video 'The immense logistical challenge of B.C.’s mass vaccination program'



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The immense logistical challenge of B.C.’s mass vaccination program


The immense logistical challenge of B.C.’s mass vaccination program

Currently, hospital workers, Indigenous communities and long-term care home residents, staff and essential visitors are among those being vaccinated in Stage 1 of the plan.

Stage 2 will begin in February and include people 80 and over, Indigenous seniors over 65, general practitioners and medical specialists.

Read more:
B.C. prioritizing age and vulnerable people over non medical essential workers in mass COVID-19 immunization plan

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In April, the province will start vaccinating the general public according to five-year age groupings, starting with seniors aged 75 to 79 before moving on to those aged 70 to 74 and so on.

However, Henry added that the approval of more vaccines may mean the province’s plan could be revised to vaccinate essential workers between April and June.

Metro Vancouver bus drivers are “very disappointed” they will not be prioritized while they risk their lives to provide transportation to the public, said Balbir Mann, president of Unifor Local 111.


Click to play video 'B.C.’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan'



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B.C.’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan


B.C.’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan

The union is calling on the provincial government to immediately change the plan and include transit operators in Stage 2.

“We’re basically frontline workers, taking people to work and grocery shopping. Our members are real heroes,” said Mann. “They’re putting their lives in front of this to help out the general public.”

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Teachers are also disappointed there is no prioritization for front-line workers who have kept schools, public services and the economy open, said B.C. Teachers Federation President Teri Mooring.

“However, the vaccine supply limit is beyond our control and those among us who are most vulnerable of death and serious illness must be vaccinated first,” she said in a statement.

READ MORE: 57% of British Columbians give low score to province’s vaccine rollout plan: poll

Hopefully more vaccines are approved and the immunization strategy will be appropriately adjusted and accelerated, she said.

Mooring added if teachers are not prioritized for vaccines, the government must take immediate action to improve safety measures in schools, including mandatory masks, better physical distancing and ventilation upgrades.

“There is no denying that teachers are stressed, anxious and even afraid. We do not have the layers of protection in our schools that exist in other environments.”

© 2021 The Canadian Press

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Saskatchewan now over 100 per cent in COVID-19 vaccines administered; 260 new cases, three deaths, 168 recoveries – paNOW

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Daily COVID-19 Statistics

There are 260 new cases of COVID-19 to report in Saskatchewan on January 24, 2021, bringing the provincial total to date to 22,177 cases.

Three Saskatchewan residents who tested positive for COVID-19 have died. One death reported was in the 60-69 age group from the Far North East zone. The two other deaths were reported in the Regina zone – one in the 60-69 age group and the other in the 80+ age group.

The new cases are located in the Far North West (26), Far North Central (one), Far North East (three), North West (52), North Central (14), North East (nine), Saskatoon (72), Central West (six), Central East (11), Regina (42), South West (one), South Central (four) and South East (17) zones. Two new cases have pending residence information.

Eight cases with pending residence information were assigned to the Far North West (one), North West (four) and North Central (three) zones.

A total of 18,673 individuals have recovered and 3,251 cases are considered active.

One hundred and ninety-six (196) people are in hospital. One hundred and sixty-four (164) people are receiving inpatient care: Far North West (four), North West (13), North Central (23), North East (one), Saskatoon (68), Central West (three), Central East (eight), Regina (36), South West (one), South Central (one) and South East (six). Thirty-two (32) people are in intensive care: North West (two), North Central (four), Saskatoon (15), Central East (one), Regina (nine) and South Central (one).

There were 2,684 COVID-19 tests processed in Saskatchewan on January 23, 2021.

To date, 490,939 COVID-19 tests have been processed in Saskatchewan. As of January 22, 2021 when other provincial and national numbers were available, Saskatchewan’s per capita rate was 279,708 people tested per million population. The national rate was 452,236 people tested per million population.

Further statistics on the total number of cases among healthcare workers, breakdowns of total cases by source of infection, age, sex and region, total tests to date and the per capita testing rate can be found on the Government of Saskatchewan website. Please visit here.

The seven-day average of daily new cases is 272 (22.5 new cases per 100,000 population) and is now available on the Government of Saskatchewan website. This chart compares today’s average to data collected over the past several months. Please visit the dashboard here.

panews@jpbg.ca

On Twitter: @princealbertnow

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Premier's statement on interprovincial travel restrictions | Columbia Valley, Cranbrook, East Kootenay, Elk Valley, Kimberley, Ktunaxa Nation – E-Know.ca

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By Premier John Horgan

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, our first and overriding priority has been keeping British Columbians safe. My thanks go to everyone in B.C. who has been working hard to keep the spread under control.

We’ve heard from many people who are worried travel from outside B.C. has contributed to the spread of COVID-19. In response to those concerns, we asked for legal options on restricting interprovincial travel and a better understanding of the impact of travel on transmission.

The review of our legal options made it clear we can’t prevent people from travelling to British Columbia. We can impose restrictions on people travelling for non-essential purposes if they are causing harm to the health and safety of British Columbians.

Much of current interprovincial travel is work related and therefore cannot be restricted. Public health officials tell us what is most important is for everyone to obey health orders, wherever they are, rather than imposing mobility rules. Therefore, we will not be imposing travel restrictions at this time.

If we see transmission increase due to interprovincial travel, we will impose stronger restrictions on non-essential travellers. We will continue to work with the tourism and hospitality sectors to make sure all possible safety precautions are in place.

Today (Jan. 21), I spoke with my colleagues across Canada at the Council of the Federation and First Ministers’ meetings. The Prime Minister is exploring further international travel restrictions, and B.C. stands ready to assist. I asked my colleagues to carry a message back to their citizens: now is not the time for non-essential travel.

We ask all British Columbians to stay close to home while vaccines become available.

And to all Canadians outside of B.C., we look forward to your visit to our beautiful province when we can welcome you safely.

Lead image: Highway 93 in Kootenay National Park, near the B.C./Alberta border. e-KNOW file photo

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