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iPhone 11 vs. iPhone 11 Pro: The main differences you should care about – CNET

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Last September, Apple announced the iPhone 11 and 11 Pro as updates to the iPhone XR and XS, respectively. The new phones have significantly upgraded cameras, a blazing fast processor and overall better build quality. To top it all off, the iPhone 11, which starts at $699 (£729, AU$1,199), is $50 cheaper than the iPhone XR was when it was first released. And just FYI, there’s a new $399 iPhone SE for 2020.

Between the iPhone 11 and 11 Pro, it may be difficult to figure out which one you should get. Both phones have the same processor, same main, ultrawide and selfie cameras, and run iOS 13. On one hand, the iPhone 11 still represents one of the best values for a flagship phone you can buy today, and has many of the same 11 Pro features. On the other hand, the iPhone 11 Pro has a few key additions that make it the best iPhone ever made. At $999 (£1,049, AU$1,749), it also starts at $300 more than the iPhone 11. 

For six months I used the iPhone 11 as my daily driver and the 11 Pro as my work phone. I took lots of photos and videos with the new ultrawide-angle camera, pushed the A13 processor to its max with games and photo edits and explored all of what iOS 13 has to offer.

For most people, including myself, the iPhone 11 is more than enough, and taking that one step further, I’d actually pay $50 more for the 11 to upgrade the storage from 64GB to 128GB. But here is the wrinkle: size. The iPhone 11 Pro is a bit smaller and lighter than the 11, which I personally love, and it could be the reason to go Pro. (FYI, if you want something bigger though, with the longest battery life, the iPhone 11 Pro Max is there waiting to fill your pocket and empty your bank account.)

Angela Lang/CNET

At the heart of the iPhone 11 Pro is an iPhone 11. But with upgrades such as a high-resolution OLED display, a matte-glass finish and a stainless steel side band it gets the VIP treatment. It has a third rear camera that, combined with Apple’s new Deep Fusion image processing, takes better zoomed-in photos. But probably the most-welcomed upgrade on the 11 Pro is how much longer battery life is over the previous-generation iPhone XS. In fact, the 11 Pro lasts almost as long on a single charge as the 11.

Read our iPhone 11 Pro review.

How we tested


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Detailed comparison of iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max

iPhone 11 iPhone 11 Pro iPhone 11 Pro Max
Display size, resolution 6.1-inch LCD Liquid Retina; 1,792×828 pixels 5.8-inch OLED Super Retina XDR; 2,436×1,125 pixels 6.5-inch OLED Super Retina XDR; 2,688×1,242 pixels
Pixel density 326 ppi 458 ppi 458 ppi
Dimensions (Inches) 5.94×2.98×0.33 in 5.67×2.81×0.32 in 6.22×3.06×0.32 in
Dimensions (Millimeters) 150.9×75.7×8.3 mm 144×71.4×8.1 mm 158×77.8×8.1 mm
Weight (Ounces, Grams) 6.84 oz; 194g 6.63 oz; 188g 7.97 oz; 226g
Mobile software iOS 13 iOS 13 iOS 13
Camera 12-megapixel (wide), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide) 12-megapixel (wide), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide), 12-megapixel (telephoto) 12-megapixel (wide), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide), 12-megapixel (telephoto)
Front-facing camera 12-megapixel with Face ID 12-megapixel with Face ID 12-megapixel with Face ID
Video capture 4K 4K 4K
Processor Apple A13 Bionic Apple A13 Bionic Apple A13 Bionic
Storage 64GB, 128GB, 256GB 64GB, 256GB, 512GB 64GB, 256GB, 512GB
RAM Not disclosed Not disclosed Not disclosed
Expandable storage None None None
Battery Not disclosed, but Apple claims it will last 1 hour longer than iPhone XR Not disclosed, but Apple claims it will last 4 hours longer than iPhone XS Not disclosed, but Apple claims it will last 5 hours longer than iPhone XS Max
Fingerprint sensor None (Face ID) None (Face ID) None (Face ID)
Connector Lightning Lightning Lightning
Headphone jack No No No
Special features Water resistant (IP68); dual-SIM capabilities (nano-SIM and e-SIM); wireless charging Water resistant (IP68); dual-SIM capabilities (nano-SIM and e-SIM); wireless charging Water resistant (IP68); dual-SIM capabilities (nano-SIM and e-SIM); wireless charging
Price off-contract (USD) $699 (64GB), $749 (128GB), $849 (256GB) $999 (64GB), $1,149 (256GB), $1,349 (512GB) $1,099 (64GB), $1,249 (256GB), $1,449 (512GB)

The smaller iPhone was better

Perhaps the most obvious and important reason to buy the iPhone 11 Pro over the iPhone 11 is size. They are very differently sized phones and they will fit in your hands differently.

With a 5.8-inch screen and a weight of 6.63 ounces (188 grams), the iPhone 11 Pro is the smallest of the three iPhone 11 devices. (Though, if a small phone is what you’re after, the new iPhone SE might be a better option, at 4.7 inches and 5.22 ounces.) The solid-feeling phone is the easiest to use one-handed. Weighing 6.84 ounces the iPhone 11 is heavier than the 11 Pro but doesn’t feel as dense. The iPhone 11 is 0.2 millimeters thicker than the 11 Pro, which makes it feel a tad chunky.

Everyone’s hands and needs are different. I have large hands, but prefer the svelte feeling of the 11 Pro. But if you are willing to compromise a heavier weight for a larger screen, get the 11 and save $300.

Winner: For its small size, the 11 Pro is the way to go for me.

Telephoto camera is nice to have

The iPhone 11 Pro (and 11 Pro Max) has a third telephoto camera that the iPhone 11 doesn’t. At times it was nice switching to the telephoto camera. And compared to the iPhone XS, the updated telephoto camera combined with Deep Fusion processing meant I took photos with better image quality.

There were also times when I framed a shot better with the 11 Pro’s telephoto camera than I could with the main camera. For example, when I took a top-down shot of a plate of food with the main camera, I could see the phone’s shadow on the plate. But when I switched to the telephoto camera and moved the phone higher away from the table there was no shadow.

There are a couple caveats about the iPhone 11 Pro’s telephoto camera though. When you take Night Mode photos at 2x, the 11 Pro doesn’t use the telephoto camera. Instead, it takes a crop of the main wide-angle camera. Also, the telephoto camera excels in bright conditions, but when taking photos in medium-to-low light, I noticed better image quality when I took the same photo with the main camera and cropped in.

All in all, the telephoto lens is useful on the 11 Pro, but I didn’t miss having it when I used the 11. If I needed to zoom in on a photo, a 2x crop of a photo I took with the main camera worked fine. I do recommend looking at the photos you have on your current phone and see how many were taken zoomed in and how many photos would look better had you been able to zoom in a bit. If you have a lot of pictures where you wished you had a dedicated telephoto camera, then you should consider an iPhone 11 Pro.

For more on the iPhone 11 and 11 Pro cameras, check out our comparisons below:

Winner: The 11 Pro’s telephoto camera is a nice-to-have if you value iPhone photography, but it’s certainly not necessary

The iPhone 11 Pro has a gorgeous OLED display

The iPhone 11 Pro has a 5.8-inch OLED screen, while the 11 has a 6.1-inch LCD display. When I look at the phones side-by-side, the screen on the 11 Pro looked better, brighter and showed off more details. It is a joy to watch videos and edit photos on.

The OLED screen on the 11 Pro supports HDR and has a contrast ratio (the ratio of the brightest and darkest colors on a display) of 2,000,000:1 compared to the 11’s 1,400:1. On paper that means the iPhone 11 Pro is capable of darker black levels and more color saturation. That said, side-by-side, the differences between the two screens are sometimes hard to notice. In and of itself, the colors on the iPhone 11’s LCD are accurate and videos look good.

Winner: The screen on the iPhone 11 is good, but the one on the 11 Pro is even better.

Cracked screens and waterproofing

We put both the iPhone 11 and 11 Pro through a test where we dropped them from different heights. After dropping them from 3-feet, 6-feet and 8-feet off the ground both phones survived without a single crack to their screens or glass backs. The only blemish was a small scuff to the iPhone 11’s aluminum band and a few damaged pixels on the bottom of the 11 Pro’s screen.

As far as water resistance, both of these phones are rated IP68. Apple claims the iPhone 11 can withstand being submerged at a depth of 6.5 feet (2 meters) up to 30 minutes and the 11 Pro can survive at a maximum depth of 13 feet (4 meters) up to 30 minutes. However, in our water tests with an underwater drone, the 11 and 11 Pro both survived being submerged for 30 minutes at 39 feet (11.9 meters).

Winner: Tie; both the iPhone 11 and 11 Pro are some of the most durable phones you can buy today,

Color, finish and extras

After six months of use without a case, the backs of both the iPhone 11 and 11 Pro still didn’t have a single scratch or scuff. The textured matte glass back on the iPhone 11 Pro feels soft, smooth and durable. The phone is easy to grip and never feels like it’s going to slip out of my hand (though again, its smaller size helps with this). I’m happy to say that fingerprint smudges don’t accumulate easily.

The iPhone 11, meanwhile, has a glossy glass back, which does feel slippery in my hand and the phone is prone to smudges, too.

As far as colors, the iPhone 11 gets things more right than the 11 Pro. You can buy an iPhone 11 in six bright and fun colors. The 11 Pro is less flashy and comes in four rather serious finishes (space gray, silver, gold or midnight green). In a perfect world, I could have the matte glass finish of the 11 Pro and the color options of the 11. 

The iPhones have wireless charging and support fast charging, but only the iPhone 11 Pro (and 11 Pro Max) comes with the 18-watt charger that’s required for fast charging. It’s aggravating that the 11 doesn’t come with this charger and that you’ll have to buy it separately if you want it. To make matters worse, Apple charges $29 (£29, AU$49) for the 18-watt fast charger and $19 (£19, AU$29) for the cable, when cheaper compatible alternatives are available.

Winner: On colors alone, the iPhone 11 takes this one. 


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Ford Announces Return of the Mustang Mach 1 for 2021 If the Mach 1 proves to be a step up from the Bullitt it’s more or less replacing, we can expect some fireworks – Auto123.com

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After much speculation, the Ford Mustang Mach 1 is officially back. Ford made the announcement today, adding some extra sunshine to the upcoming weekend for fans of the model.

And according to Dave Pericak, Mustang program director, we’re in for “the most track-capable 5.0-liter Mustang ever.” Considering how well the Mustang GT Performance Pack 2 has been received, that’s a bold statement. However, the company confirms the 2021 Ford Mustang Mach 1 will be the range-topping 5-litre Mustang next year.

 Note, however, that it will be sold in limited quantities.

Beyond that, few other details have been divulged at this point. The model was seen – and photographed by Ford – on the test track test, but the front and rear ends were camouflaged. Still, some differences were discernible, the most obvious being the circular air intakes of the Mach 1, located inside the grille where the headlights were placed… back in 1969. In addition, the upper and lower grilles have a unique honeycomb mesh pattern.

At the rear, we can see massive exhaust pipes and a spoiler that looks a lot like that of the Shelby GT350. In addition, like the latter, the Mach 1 is fitted with Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires, with 305/30R19 ultra-grip rubber up front. Brembo brakes come as no surprise.

Auto123 launches Shopicar! All new makes and models and all current promotions.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach 1, rear

The most persistent speculation is that this Mach 1 will replace the Bullitt in the range as a limited-production model. This could mean that the Mach 1 will be equipped with the Bullitt’s 5.0L V8 engine, a block that develops 480 hp, or 20 more than the standard GT version – all thanks to an intake manifold derived from that of the GT350.

As for price, nothing was announced today. Going by precedent, we can expect a price tag somewhere between that of the GT and Shelby models. This could mean that the Mach 1 will be priced similar to the Bullitt. Also, if the other rumour about the GT350 version being removed from the catalogue is confirmed, it could leave Ford more leeway in terms of performance and price.  

A lot remains unknown, therefore, but one known known is that a lot of folks’ ears have just perked up.

The next generation of the Mustang is expected somewhere in 2022, probably as a 2023 model, unless Ford decides to move it up a year ahead of schedule.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach 1, Brembo brake

2021 Ford Mustang Mach 1, Brembo brake

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Spaced desks, one-way halls, voice technology — your post-COVID-19 office will look much different – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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The Office is Over

is a collection of Post stories looking at the how the pandemic has changed the view of the office.


As Canadians gear up to return to work, employers are putting into place a wide range of safety protocols to protect their workplaces from the threat of COVID-19.


As a result, offices in a post-pandemic world could look very different from before, experts say. And they might stay that way.


“There’s going to be a forced evolution at the office,” said Evan Hardie, who researches the future of work at Canadian workplaces.


Returning employees could see a host of changes, including spaced desks, personal lockers, voice-automated technology, staged areas for elevators and one-way hallways, Hardie said. They may also have to follow new protocols such as varying shifts, cleaning surfaces after usage, and wearing PPE to the office.


Some employees may never return to the office again, Hardie said, as companies who have been forced to develop technology for remote work during the pandemic may not be able to afford the new cost of renovating their spaces.


Yet all this doesn’t necessarily mean the end of the traditional office tower, according to Lisa Fulford-Roy, vice president with Toronto commercial real estate giant CBRE. “I think this is going to shine a lens on how can we be smarter about the spaces we’re creating for people to occupy safely and healthily and productively,” she said.


PHYSICAL LAYOUT


According to experts, the biggest challenge for firms will be having to redesign spaces that have been in place for decades, to allow for physical and social distancing rules.


Since the last economic downturn, companies have been following an open office trend, where “essentially everybody’s sitting really close to each other,” Hardie said, to allow for more communication. “I think we’re going to see a change there, where you’re going to have employees spaced out, they won’t maybe be facing each other in the office too.”


To maintain physical distancing rules, companies are considering spaced desks, one-way hallways, and the reconfiguration of common areas like kitchens, utility rooms and staging areas for elevators. Gensler, an American architecture firm, has released ‘ReRun,’ a tool which reconfigures your office’s existing floor plan to optimize physical distancing conditions, using computer algorithms.


Under new set-ups, workers may also be asked to come into the office at different times and bring their own equipment.


“Keyboards, mice, headsets, those things are going to be personal accessories now,” said Hardie. “So you’ll have either a locker at the office that you can lock yourself or you’re hauling it back and forth every day.”

Many workplaces could follow in the path of major tech companies and restructure their work environments from headquarters to hubs. “Rather than having a head office where the majority of their workforce is in one central location, firms may opt for regional hubs,” Hardie said.

Christian Paquette, a labour employment lawyer, said he’s gotten many questions from companies. These range from how to implement policies on shared rooms, to the nitty gritty details around personal garbage bins, ventilation systems, eating utensils, and desired cubicle heights.

“I think, ironically, one challenge for employers might be that some may not have sufficient space anymore because of social distancing,” he said. “They may need to find more space in some cases, or put an emphasis on some parts of their workspaces and less on others.”


WORK POLICY

At the beginning of May, Paquette and a colleague released a list of

key guidelines

for employers looking to incorporate COVID-19 requirements into their work policies.

“There needs to be clear lines of communication,” said Paquette. The article recommended that employers form a “dedicated, multi-disciplinary team” to monitor the workplace reopening and conduct risk assessments; create a contingency plan in case of a shutdown; and open a communication channel keeping employees informed of the measures being put in place and any changes thereafter.

Employers also need to develop a procedure to address attendance issues and work refusals, such as those for “employees who are afraid to return or may face special circumstances” such as compromised immunity or child or elder care obligations.

Mohammad

Abdoli-Eramaki, who teaches occupation health and safety at Ryerson University, emphasized the need for a system that monitors individuals, to identify those at risk of spreading the virus.


“The issue with COVID-19 is that it’s not identifiable,” he said, which in turn makes it difficult to determine certain hot spots in a workplace where exposure to the virus is increased. Ergo, “there should be a system in place where (the individual) monitors (themselves) … and if (they) don’t follow the policy, someone else does (monitor them).”

Paquette said it ultimately comes down to the level of risk each employer faces.

“For instance, (if) you have a proven outbreak in a work environment, that may justify different measures than an office space where people are not in close quarters (and) where other types of measures can really be put in place that are much less intrusive, like social distancing and self-reporting,” he said.


TECHNOLOGY

The pandemic has forced several workplaces to hastily upgrade and/or invest in technology to allow for people working remotely. On one hand, for those coming back to the office, employers might continue to make investments to keep the office accessible and safe, such as voice and automation technology.

“The ability to not have to touch everything in the office, to have technology that steps in, either through automation or through your voice, allows you to take your hands off a lot of things that you would have been touching in the past,” said Hardie. Companies looking to track employee movements could do so via keycard access, or by using technology that produces heat maps and monitors social distancing.

On the other hand, companies who have already invested in technology that supports remote work may find the additional investments too costly. “They may well say, okay we’ve made this major investment on ramping everybody up for home office, so maybe we’ll wait until we figure out a good plan of attack for the actual office itself’,” explained Hardie.


ALTERNATIVES TO THE OFFICE

For employers who have successfully adapted to working from home during the pandemic, there may no longer be a need for an office anymore, said Allison Cowan, director of capital of the Conference Board of Canada.

“They are seeing advantages in the long term, such as real estate savings, benefits from commuting, benefits for employee heath,” she said. Several large companies such as Twitter and

Open Text

have already asked staff to continue working remotely indefinitely, while others like BMO have confirmed they are looking into hybrid schemes that would combine the office with remote work opportunities.

For some companies, that might mean rethinking their current spaces, for others it might mean letting go of their leases entirely and opting for flexible alternatives, i.e., rentable co-working spaces.

Kevin Penstock is the CEO of The Profile, a Vancouver company that offers rental co-working spaces. He said he’s been receiving a lot of calls. “There’s no question (that demand for these spaces will go up),” he said. “People are going to try and figure out how to get all their staff in their offices downtown, half the people will be stuck at home, these companies are going to need this type of select space.”

Penstock has rolled out a

multi-phased plan

for the reopening of his spaces, which includes modified shared spaces (two-person tables instead of five), the phased return of members, physical distancing signage, health screenings and a new cleaning regimen.

The challenge, he said, will be catering to demand despite the limits on the number of people per shared space, as well as monitoring those who flout the rules. “We can ask people to start doing some shift work,” he said. “Then we’re going to have to start sharing the space in a way that’s a bit different than we’re used to.”

However, while the demand for traditional offices may go down, it won’t entirely disappear, according to Fulford-Roy of

CBRE. That’s because

people miss the social element that comes with working at an office.

“There may be subsets of employees or departments where (working remotely) might be suitable”, she said. “But I think, for the most part, we’re missing our colleagues, we’re missing the interaction.”


“It’s going to be less about changing the landscape of engagement and productivity. (Instead) it’s going to be a lens of how do we do that safely?”

Copyright Postmedia Network Inc., 2020

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Ford is bringing back the Mustang Mach 1 for 2021 – Driving

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Seventeen years after the last Mustang Mach 1 rode off into the sunset, Ford is bringing back that storied nameplate for 2021.

There’s no EcoBoost four-cylinder here, of course. It’s 5.0L V8 all the way, and Ford said the new Mach 1 will be the “most track-ready 5.0L Mustang ever.”

The automaker has only unveiled teaser images for now, but we’re seeing huge quad pipes, Brembo brakes behind 19-inch wheels wrapped with Pilot Sport Cup 2 performance tires, and honeycomb grilles, but with round inlets that are mindful of the lights on the first Mach 1 of 1969.

That first Mach 1 came stock with a 351-cubic-inch (5.7-L) V8 that made 250 horsepower, with two optional V8s. That was matched to a GT handling suspension for improved performance.

Exactly what 5.0L V8 the 2021 Mach 1 will get is still up in the air. For 2020, Ford offers 460 horses in the GT; 480 hp in the Bullitt; and moving up to the Shelby models, you get 526 hp in the GT350, and 760 hp in the supercharged GT500.

The Mach 1 was traditionally Mustang’s step between the base cars and the top-of-the-powerband models. The Bullitt has come and gone before, and both it and the GT350 are slated for the chopping block at the end of this model year. That would logically slide the Mach 1 between the GT and GT500, and give it bragging rights as the most powerful naturally-aspirated eight-cylinder.

The original Mach 1 debuted for 1969, and continued through when the Mustang grew larger and longer for 1971. It also made the transition to the smaller, all-new Mustang II in 1974, but was discontinued in 1978. It returned for the 2003 and 2004 model years as a retro-style edition with 4.6L V8 making 302 horsepower, and with a stick shift or automatic transmission.

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